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first_img Press Association “Free Eagle was pushed out a bit and finished third. He’s a top-class horse and we messed one race up, we nearly messed up another with the shadows. “I think the fact that Free Eagle was third is a great help to us. “I’m glad I know why he did it because he’s never done anything like that before. “This is a great race and it’s a perfect three weeks into the Arc, where we’d love to go. He stays well and he’s proved that again today. “We’d like to go there, but we don’t want a monsoon in Paris. “He’s at his best on good, good to firm ground as he’s got an electric turn of foot. Today he galloped them into the ground, but he’s much better off a strong pace, bursting with speed. “Today we had no choice. There was never going to be a strong gallop. “I knew Found was our big danger, she’s come to herself and she was the one I was frightened of.” RaceBets cut the Anthony Oppenheimer-owned Golden Horn to 6-1 from 7-1 for the Arc at Longchamp on October 4. Gosden also has Irish Derby winner Jack Hobbs for Paris, but warned: “Jack is there if it rains, if it rains a lot – if not I don’t want him to get beaten by Golden Horn again, I’d like him to go for the Champion Stakes at Ascot.” Dettori said: “What a great race today. Seven Group One winners, all high standard and he did it the hard way. “He showed the world again he’s a top-class horse. He saw something by the winning post, I don’t know what it was. John thinks it was a shadow, but he still won very well. “Maybe we made a mistake at York (using a pacemaker). He wants a good tempo and he’s redeemed himself today.” Oppenheimer said: “I’m very proud indeed. It was lovely for the horse to lead from start to finish. “He jumped a shadow in the middle of the course, but otherwise it was faultless. “I think if he hadn’t jumped that he’d have won by another two lengths. “We saw what happened in the English St Leger (Simple Verse disqualified from first place) and these things are very difficult. “I think on better ground he’d be much better and I’m confident if we see good ground again, maybe in the Champion Stakes at Ascot or the Arc or somewhere, you’ll will see what he’s like.” Train Aidan O’Brien was pleased with Found’s effort. He said: “I’m delighted with the run – she ran a great race. “She’ll appreciate going up to a mile and a half. The plan was to come either here or the Vermeille and then the Arc, but we didn’t want to travel with her if we didn’t have to.” Pat Smullen, rider of Free Eagle, said philosophically: “It would have been nice to have had a clean shot at him, but it wasn’t to be and we live to fight another day. “It took my momentum away and brought him to a standstill, but the other side of that is the horse in front was doing nothing.” Gleneagles missed the race due to the rain-softened ground, but O’Brien gave his son of Galileo a gallop after racing, and said: “We’re very pleased with him. “He went seven furlongs with his usual work partner Siege Of Orleans. It was good for him to let off some steam.” John Gosden’s Derby and Eclipse winner veered across from the far rail inside the final furlong, bumping into Free Eagle who was making a strong challenge and was almost upsides. There was no time for Free Eagle to regain his momentum and Golden Horn, the 5-4 favourite, came home in front after making most of the running under Frankie Dettori. Found ran on to grab second place, just ahead of the Dermot Weld-trained Free Eagle. As expected, a stewards’ inquiry was immediately called, but following some deliberation the placings remained unaltered. Golden Horn was getting his head back in front after losing his unbeaten record in a shock defeat to Arabian Queen in the Juddmonte International at York – a race like the Foxrock feature that had seen dual 2000 Guineas winner Gleneagles a defector following overnight rain. Gosden said: “We got our tactics wrong at York. I thought the filly was magnificent, but we laid far too far back. “I left it to the jockey and he’s gone to the other extreme again. He’s gone from the front, he’s a very good horse. “The shadow of the grandstand caught him (when he jinked to his right). There was a photographer standing there and didn’t know how marked it was at that exact point. “It caught him and he ran right across the shadow of the grandstand. The sun was out. They should probably have run the race later when there was no sun (reference to race being brought forward in quest for best ground)! “He’s done it well. He’s handled slower ground, good to soft. Golden Horn booked his ticket to the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe after returning to winning ways in a dramatic Qipco Irish Champion Stakes at Leopardstown which saw him keep the race in the stewards’ room.last_img read more

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first_imgWWE NXT TAKEOVER NIGHTFemi Solaja at the ringside in Barclays Center, New YorkIt was a historic moment as super stars of WWE NXT set the bar high on Saturday night with TakeOver Brooklyn III as titles were retained but most others lost theirs at the Barclays Center, Brooklyn, New York.One of the main heroes of the night was arguably the flamboyant Japanese female wrestler Kanako Urai fondly called Asuka who survived a painful tornado slam from formidable challenger, Ember Moon of Texas.The feat thus mean, Asuka, a graphic designer and video game journalist holds the record of the second longest reigning female champion in the last 30 years.  Asuka who has reigned for 504 days is second behind Fabulous Moolah.Moon came close to beating Asuka, more than what anyone has ever tried previously as she hit her with the eclipse. Surprisingly, Asuka became the first superstar to kick out of it such dire situation. She worked Moon’s arm and shoulder throughout the encounter. And it worked to her advantage as Moon was forced to tap the Asuka lock in the closing stage of the fight watched by over 28,000 professional wrestling fans at the packed arena.“I am better than my opponent. The crowd can see that I’m the champion and always a champion and I still want to remain the champion for a much longer time,” remarked exhausted Asuka after the clash to THISDAY at the ringside.Frustrated Moon entered TakeOver as perhaps the most dominant Superstar in WWE history. Her winning streak surpassed that of Goldberg in WCW, and it seemed as though nobody was capable of knocking her from her perch.Although there had been some close calls, it can be argued that nobody pushed Asuka more than Moon at NXT TakeOver: Orlando the night before WrestleMania.Ember seems to have her on the ropes, but Asuka used the referee to interrupt Moon’s attempt to hit the Eclipse, which resulted in the Japanese Superstar retaining her precious belt for atleast another day.THISDAY recalled that it was an injury that prevented Moon from competing at NXT TakeOver: Chicago, where Asuka defeated both Nikki Cross and Ruby Riot in a Triple Threat match.In the other events of the night, Adam Cole, Kyle O’Reilly and Bobby Fish left as NXT champion Drew McIntyre picked the title. McIntyre defeated tittle holder and crowd pleaser, Bobby Roode to become the new men champion. McIntyre remains undefeated since his return to NXT, as he beat Bobby Roode at NXT TakeOver: Brooklyn III to become the new NXT champion.Roode appeared on course to win the match, but he got greedy by going for three Glorious DDTs in a row, and McIntyre took advantage by hitting the Claymore Kick to win.“I don’t want to talk now, I will squeeze the hell out of him when next I come across him,” the dethroned champion Roode,yelled at waiting media after the match. But the follow up after the match was when Cole made his debut at NXT with a savage super kick on victorious Mclntyre who was still savouring his win. He was left rolling on the ground with his belt in the ring.Earlier in the night, the war between NXT tag team champions, The Authors of Pain and Sanity, resulted in a physical battle between the teams. Originally, it was supposed to be Alexander Wolfe and Killian Dain representing the latter, it turned out to be Eric Young who replaced Dain mid-match.Young found himself isolated from partner Wolfe for the majority of the match, beaten black and blue by the oppressive champions.A hot tag to Wolfe led to a strong showing from the German, who broke out and brought a physical intensity and unpredictability to the proceedings.Late in the match, both Young and Wolfe flew onto Akam and Rezar at the ringside. Nikki Cross teased following in kind, only for Paul Ellering to enter the squared circle. The Hall of Fame manager distracted the referee as Cross flew into the waiting arms of Akam.Dain speared both of them through a table, allowing Young and Wolfe to deliver a combination neck-breaker and score the tag titles.After the match, Kyle O’Reilly and Bobby Fish hit the ring and obliterated the new champions and stood tall, the titles in their grip.After the thrilling night, fans went home happy and looking forward to late Sunday’s WWE SummerSlam Battle scheduled for the same venue. The main match of the night was between WWE Champion, Jinder Mahal and Japanese Shinsuke Natalya for the men’s tittle while Randy Orton faces Rusev for the first time in his career. In SmackDown tag team champions, The New Day will stage their tittle against The Usos in one of the several bouts of the night.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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first_img Published on November 10, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: mcooperj@syr.edu | @mark_cooperjr Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img As assistant coaches under one of the most revered coaches of all time, Charlie Strong and Skip Holtz helped turn around a program together. The former South Carolina coordinators helped turn a winless Gamecocks team into an Outback Bowl champion in one year. Now they are each turning around their own programs as head coaches. Strong spent four seasons as the Gamecocks’ defensive coordinator under his coaching mentor, Lou Holtz. That’s where Strong and Skip Holtz share a common thread — through Skip’s father. The legendary Lou Holtz brought Strong under his wing for many years. And of course, he had Skip. ‘We have a bond there that we’re really good friends,’ Strong said Monday in the Big East coaches’ teleconference. ‘Skip’s an outstanding football coach.’ Eight years since they last coached together, Strong and Skip Holtz will face off Saturday as Louisville (5-4, 2-2 Big East) takes on South Florida (5-3, 2-2). Both coaches have taken different routes to reach their current positions, but now each finds himself building up a Big East program in his first year.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text And each coach comes from the influences of Lou Holtz. Strong was a defensive line coach on Lou’s staff on Notre Dame from 1995-96. He remained even after Lou left, until 1999, when Strong made the jump to South Carolina to become Lou’s defensive coordinator at his new job. While Strong was being mentored at Notre Dame, Skip Holtz was the head coach at Connecticut, at the time a Division I-AA school. He had success there, even winning 10 games in 1998. But when his father took over the Gamecocks’ head coaching job, Skip signed on to become the offensive coordinator. The heads of the staff were set: Lou Holtz as head coach, Skip Holtz as offensive coordinator, Charlie Strong as defensive coordinator. That’s how it would be for four years, as the coaching staff built up a program that was one of the worst in Division I-A when they took over. ‘It was a program similar to this (Louisville) when we took over,’ Strong said. ‘We did not win any games our first year, but came back and won two straight Outback Bowls.’ Turning around a program that had won one game the year before they arrived strengthened Skip Holtz and Strong’s relationship. They suffered through a 0-11 season their first year together. And they got to see the building of the South Carolina program firsthand. ‘I’ve known Charlie for a long time,’ Holtz said. ‘Him and (Strong’s wife) Vickie are just great people, and our kids have played together. … I think the world of Charlie.’ Both Strong and Holtz also got to reap the benefits of turning around a program together. After the 2002 season, Strong bolted from South Carolina to take the same role as defensive coordinator at Florida. Strong was the only assistant retained by current UF head coach Urban Meyer when he took over for the 2005 season. Strong was eventually promoted to associate head coach under Meyer, in addition to his defensive coordinator role. Strong won two national championships at Florida, and he turned that success into his current job with the Cardinals. Now he has a Louisville team picked to finish last in the Big East at the beginning of the season on the cusp of becoming bowl eligible. He has the Louisville defense looking like the Florida defenses that continually fought for the SEC title. And like the Gamecocks defenses that won back-to-back Outback Bowls. ‘They come after you, they’re very, very aggressive,’ Holtz said about a Charlie Strong defense. ‘They’re not ‘sit back and let you dictate.’ They’re going to try and dictate the game on defense.’ Holtz left South Carolina after the 2003 season to become the head coach at East Carolina. There, he took the Pirates to four bowls in five seasons. In 2008, his team upset nationally ranked powers Virginia Tech and West Virginia. He joined the Big East this season with South Florida, and after a slow start to conference play, he has the Bulls looking to clinch a bowl as well this weekend. ‘If you look at it, when he coached at Connecticut, he had great success,’ Strong said. ‘Then he came to South Carolina, and he leaves South Carolina and at East Carolina he does a great job. ‘He understands the game and knows exactly how to get his players to go and play.’ Saturday, the two friends and former co-workers who know a great deal about each other will square off, with the winner becoming bowl eligible. It would be a monumental win for either school. Louisville hasn’t made a bowl since 2006, but USF has never won at the Cardinals’ home stadium. It will be Holtz’s offense vs. Strong’s defense. This time, on opposite sides. And neither coach is taking the other side lightly. ‘I think he’s a great football coach, I think he’s a great person, and he’s doing a great job at Louisville,’ Holtz said. ‘I think when you say this is a typical Charlie Strong defense, yeah, it is.’ Big man on campus RB Jeremy Wright Freshman Louisville Last week: 19 carries, 98 yards, 2 TDs Louisville entered last Saturday’s game at Syracuse as a bit of an underdog. The Cardinals were banged up, missing both its starting quarterback and running back. But Wright took advantage of the opportunity. With only two games on the Big East schedule last week, Wright stood out with a big performance in a 28-20 win at Syracuse. The freshman, filling in for Louisville’s star running back Bilal Powell, ran for 98 yards and a pair of scores as the Cardinals won its first road Big East game in 12 tries. Wright broke open the scoring in the first quarter with a 28-yard touchdown run to put UL up 7-0. Later on, his 12-yard touchdown run put Louisville back on top for good, 21-17. The backup running back set career highs in just about every rushing statistic Saturday. He entered the game with only 14 carries on the season. And he proved that if UL was to be missing Powell for any extended period of time, he could be a serviceable fill-in. ‘He is not very big,’ UL head coach Charlie Strong said, ‘but can get behind his pads and has enough speed, quickness and strength to make the runs and make people miss him.’ mcooperj@syr.edulast_img read more

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first_img Published on June 18, 2014 at 3:24 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Defensive end Brandon Ginnetti committed to Syracuse’s Class of 2015 on Wednesday, CuseNation.com reported.The Hamden Hall (Conn.) High School junior went on his visit to SU on Tuesday with Andrejas Duerig. Duerig committed to the Orange on Tuesday afternoon.Ginnetti is listed at 6 feet, 3 inches and 240 pounds according to Scout.com. He chose Syracuse over offers from Illinois, Boston College and Army. He is the 13th overall commit to the Class of 2015, and second defensive end.He is also the third player from Connecticut to verbally commit, all of which came in the past eight days. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img

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first_img Published on February 17, 2016 at 9:50 pm Contact Chris: cfthomse@syr.edu A five-game winning streak. Back-to-back sweeps of conference opponents. Winner of eight of its last 11 games.The Orange is ending its regular season by playing its best hockey of the year. But even with only two games left, SU is still operating at full speed in hopes of earning the top seed in the conference.“We need to win both games, especially going into the playoffs,” defender Nicole Renault said. “We have that bye week, so we can leave on a good foot. We’re not satisfied with where we are.”Syracuse (16-13-3, 12-4-2 College Hockey America) is still second in the CHA standings to Mercyhurst, who also swept its opponent, RIT, last weekend. That’s forced head coach Paul Flanagan and his team to keep up its consistent play this weekend against Lindenwood (8-20-4, 5-9-4). In order to clinch first outright, Syracuse must win both games while Mercyhurst must lose or tie its two games.“There’s still a lot on the line on Friday,” Flanagan said. “We have to do our job, and potentially Penn State (who faces Mercyhurst this weekend) will help us out, which would set the stage for Saturday, where we have to win again.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFive-game winning streaks are rare for SU. The Orange’s last one came in early 2013, highlighted by a win over No. 3 Boston College. Syracuse has never had one this late in the season, which Flanagan considers a huge advantage compared to his past teams.Even if Flanagan wasn’t forced to win this weekend in order to earn the No. 1 rank in the conference, he would still try to keep the Orange’s confidence going.“We’re trying to maintain the status quo,” Flanagan said. “We’re keeping things very similar. After five months, you’re in a pretty good routine.”He couldn’t be happier that his schedule ends with four home games, which allows all of his players to maintain their regular routines. He cancelled practice on Monday for the third consecutive week. He’s continued to back off with his criticisms. And he’s cut down on his overall time spent with the team, which he says isn’t even close to the maximum 20 hours granted by the NCAA.All are signs of trust in his team’s experience and morale. The Orange’s six-goal period against Robert Morris last Saturday is all the evidence he needs, which he called the strongest 20 minutes his team has played this season.“We’re hitting full stride here,” Flanagan said. “The girls feel pretty good about themselves, and so much in sport is about having confidence. I think as a group, the girls have so much confidence.”But Syracuse isn’t the only team in the conference playing at its best right now. Rival Mercyhurst has won seven of its last nine matchups, including its last four.The Lakers’ last loss was a 2-1 loss to Syracuse on Jan. 30, thanks to Jessica Sibley’s game-winner with a minute and a half left in overtime.The Orange’s last defeat was a 4-1 loss to Mercyhurst on Jan. 29.Since then, Flanagan thinks his team has learned to prevent mistakes late in games that have led to losses earlier this season.“We’ve been able to clamp down defensively when we’ve needed to,” Flanagan said. “Whether it’s making a good play, getting the puck out of the zone or clearing rebounds, or (goalie Jenn Gilligan) making a good save.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ After seeing Tyler Lydon score only two points in Syracuse’s season opener, Jim Boeheim was quick to identify the root of the sophomore’s struggles. Lydon had yet to make a shot in three games behind the arc (including two exhibitions), so the head coach’s remedy was simple: Get closer.“He’s more effective when he’s around the basket,” Boeheim said of Lydon after SU’s win over Colgate last week. “He’s not really getting a lot of looks out there, they’re guarding him.”“… He’s got to get on the offensive boards a little bit better and when he gets it down there, he’s got to finish.”By the end of No. 18 Syracuse’s (2-0) 90-46 dismantling of Holy Cross (0-2), Lydon fulfilled every one Boeheim’s words, sinking 6-of-7 shots and totaling 17 points. The first 10 came in direct vicinity of the basket, punctuating a performance rivaled only by Andrew White’s 19 points.Against Colgate, Lydon’s shooting slump reared just feet in front of the Raiders’ bench, as the sophomore whiffed on a pair of 3s. Tuesday night in the Carrier Dome, Lydon found himself repeatedly in the same spot. But this time, he cut. He drove. He moved. Anything to distance himself from a dismal shooting night, and it worked.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I was trying to get after it on the boards and just play my game,” Lydon said.That meant almost completely abandoning the 3-point shot early, and cheating toward the basket at times against mismatched defenders. It didn’t take long to realize he could easily pierce his way through the Crusaders’ protection, and his first points of the night came on a third-chance play.John Gillon heaved an errant 3-pointer that Tyler Roberson scooped up, and he subsequently missed a short jumper. But there was Lydon, rooted under the basket, standing taller than every defender Holy Cross dispatched to the floor. Lydon elevated and dropped in the basket to equal his production from a game ago, and more importantly, map out a plan to feast inside the rest of the game.Liam Sheehan | Staff PhotographerHe handled a missed alley-oop attempt from Gillon, maintaining the wherewithal to come down with the ball and score on the way back up. He drew a pair of fouls around the hoop, converting on 3-of-4 free-throw attempts. He did almost everything he hadn’t been, and missed only one of his five shots in the first 20 minutes.“He’s going to learn throughout the course of the year,” White said, “when you’re the red X on everybody’s scouting report, you have to be able to find ways to get yourself going. Get cheap buckets and provide what your team needs.”Exiting the tunnel after the halftime, the lone remaining objective for Lydon remained beyond the 3-point arc. He tried only once in the first half, and it was his only shot gone awry. Lydon said last week that his success from deep needed to happen “naturally.” That didn’t mean he couldn’t help himself beforehand, which he did before Syracuse’s Monday practice.Under the watch of assistant coach Adrian Autry, Lydon jogged back and forth between both corners behind the arc. Three team managers shagged rebounds as Lydon consecutively shot a pyramid seven from each corner, meaning he shot and consecutively made seven, six, five, four, three, two and finally one 3 from both spots on the floor.With a solid offensive game already padding is stat line, Lydon’s 3-point work came to quickly fruition in the second half. On a dish from Frank Howard, Lydon heaved a 3 just feet from the far corner he spent most of the time before Monday’s practice in. The shot fell, and Syracuse’s bench rose in celebration.“I’m pretty hard on myself,” Lydon said, “but I try to let it go. I knew my offense was going to come.“… You always think about what happened in the past and you try and move on from it.”If nothing else, that’s what Tuesday’s blowout illustrated: Lydon moved on. Fittingly it was on the day he joined college basketball’s elites on the Wooden Award watch list, and he looked like he belonged. Not only on the list, but as the focal point of Syracuse’s offense. Comments Published on November 15, 2016 at 9:08 pm Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossmanlast_img read more

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first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“My time at Syracuse has been tremendous. I am not sure I can ever express my thanks to the administration for this opportunity at Syracuse,” Fox said in the SU release. “The young people I was fortunate enough to coach were the very best; however, I have an opportunity in the professional ranks that I could not refuse. I thank everyone involved with Syracuse Athletics for what was accomplished.”The move ends a historic 13-year run for Fox, who since taking over the program in 2005 has led the Orange to nine conference championships and the 2015 men’s cross country national championship. The success with the Orange prompted SU men’s basketball head coach Jim Boeheim to declare Fox “the best coach in the department,” former SU Athletic Director Daryl Gross said.In addition to the 2015 title, Fox coached multiple individual Atlantic Coast Conference and national champions, most recently Paige Stoner (women’s cross country ACC champion and women’s steeplechase ACC champion), Noah Affolder (men’s steeplechase ACC Champion) and Justyn Knight (2017 men’s cross country national champion and indoor 5K national champion).After his SU career, per the release, Fox will pursue professional opportunities. Syracuse cross country and track head coach Chris Fox has retired from collegiate coaching, SU Athletics announced in a release Thursday morning. A national search will begin to find Fox’s replacement, the release said, and Fox’s associate head coach, Brien Bell, will serve as the interim head coach. Comments Published on July 19, 2018 at 8:20 am Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcClearylast_img read more

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first_imgArsenal midfielder Aaron Ramsey could be a doubt for Saturday’s Premier League game at home to Manchester City – after injuring his ankle last night.He had to come off in the closing stages of Wales’ 2-1 win over Andorra in their opening European Championship qualifier.Manager Chris Coleman blamed the Andorran’s controversial artificial pitch for the injury – which they’ll know more about in the next 24 to 48 hours.last_img

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first_imgTwo seasons ago, Dele Alli was struggling with lowly division club – MK Dons, but his talent was not lost on the scouts of Premier League top club, Tottenham Hotspurs, and the British-born Nigerian did not disappoint. With 10 goals and nine assists in his debut season, 16 goals so far in his second season, it came as no surprise that Alli was last week crowned the PFA Young Player of the Year for the second time running. Already, European super power, Real Madrid are said to be on his trail. Is Alli  ripe enough to be a Galatico? Kunle Adewale reports“I sincerely believe in years to come, he will be a top prospect.” These were the words of John Fashanu concerning Dele Alli, but the 21-year-old did not have to wait long before taking the Premier League by storm since signing from League One, MK Dons in 2015, scoring 17 goals and providing nine assists in 32 league appearances for Spurs in his first season and 20 goals in all competitions in his second season. Alli is only the fourth player to win the award consecutively, and joins Ryan Giggs, Wayne Rooney and Robbie Fowler in that exclusive club.  Little wonder England legend, David Beckham said: “We’re lucky as a nation to have young talented players coming through, and he is without doubt one of the shining lights of these young players. He plays the game with certain arrogance, and it’s good to have that arrogance, because a lot of top players have that. He’s a joy to watch.“He’s a player that hopefully, if he works hard like he has been doing, and continues to play for the manager – Mauricio Pochettino, that he’s played for  because I think he’s a special manager, and he’s looking after him in the right way. He’s a special player. I hope he continues to get better week after week, because as an England fan, we want to see these players perform the way he’s performing.”Alli’s remarkable ascent had invited comparisons with some of the greats of the modern English game. With 30 goals in 90 appearances for Tottenham, he even has a superior record at his age than players like Frank Lampard, Steven Gerrard and Wayne Rooney. But he isn’t a similar player to any of those names. In fact, he really defies categorisation.Beckham said: “He plays as a No. 10 but he doesn’t really get that many assists. He has five so far this season in the Premier League and it’s not really his game. He is all about popping up in the final third; he’s not a player who is going to be looking to drop deep, or play one-twos on the edge of the box.“He’s almost a nine-and-a-half, between a No. 10 and a traditional centre-forward. He isn’t like other players who take up positions between the lines: he isn’t a goal creator or an intricate player like Mesut Ozil or David Silva. He wants to gallop onto the ball and score.“He has arrogance about him and he is genuinely unique. You can’t compare him with anyone in the modern game. We haven’t seen this before. What allows Alli to play in this new way is the structure Tottenham have built around him. Pochettino is also key to everything, of course. He has trusted in a young player plucked from the third tier and has thrown him into the first team, refusing to farm him out on loan. It has given him the exposure he needed to shine.”Alli signed for Tottenham in January 2015 and was loaned back to MK Dons for the second half of the previous campaign, but he immediately caught the eye in pre-season when he outplayed Luka Modric in a pre-season friendly against Real Madrid.The youngster was not expected to immediately break into Spurs first-team but he has been a regular since his first start in Tottenham’s fourth Premier League game of the season – an away win at Sunderland.It took Alli just two games to score his first Premier League goal, coming in Spurs’ 1-1 draw away to Leicester City in August. He then became one of the youngest men to be called-up to the England squad.Against France at Wembley, Alli scored his first senior international goal on his first start – a sweet right-foot strike into the far corner from outside the box.With Real Madrid said to be interested, what would be the future of Alli at Tottenham? “You can always trust Real Madrid to go for any player that has a big future. Alli has a lot of potentials to be a big star in future. If he could achieve all these with just a season in the Premier League, that means he has a big future. But I think he should not be in a hurry to move to a big club like Madrid so as not to be consumed, considering the number of big boys in the fold of the Santiago Bernabeu side.“In spite of what Alli has achieved in his two seasons at Spurs, there are still a number of areas he still needs to improve upon. He is a raw talent and young. My candid opinion is that he should just play for two or more seasons for Tottenham and be properly molded before considering a big move,” former Nigerian international, Waidi Akani told THISDAY.Some football analysts have also argued that Alli’s joining Madrid is not logical as the team is overbooked in the number 10 position and are finding it difficult to fit James Rodriguez, Isco and Marco Asensio into the team as it is. That’s not to mention the fact when everyone is fit, a no.10 position simply doesn’t exist in Madrid’s 4-3-3 system. Would they sell James and/or Isco and replace them with a mega money player who’d equally demand regular first team football?Last year, Alli was offered a new contract that would keep him at the North London club until 2021 due to his splendid performance.“When I signed, I knew wanted to play for Spurs. I’ve played a few games and showed people what I can do. I’m 19, have a lot to learn and can’t think of a better place to do that,” he told the club website.It however remain to be seen if Alli would remain at White Hart Lane or would want to tow the line of notable Tottenham player earlier before him, Luca Modric and Gareth Bale, who could not resist the move to Santiago Bernabeu when the Galaticos came knocking.Born on April 11, 1996, to a Nigeria father, in Milton Keynes, Bamidele Jermaine Alli joined the youth system at Milton Keyness Don at aged 11 and broke into the first team five years later. Over the next two-and-a-half years, he made 74 league appearances for MK Dons, scoring 22 goals.On February 2, 2015, he signed for Tottenham Hotspur in the last hours of the mid-season transfer window on a five-and-a-half-year deal for an initial fee of £5 million, staying on loan at MK Dons for the remainder of the season.He however made his Tottenham debut against on August 8, 2015 against Manchester United in the Premier League as a substitute in a 1–0 defeat away at Old Trafford,  playing the last 13 minutesTwo weeks later, he scored his first goal for the club after coming on in the 1–1 draw against Leicester City.Alli has made several appearances at U17 and U18 levels for England. On August 27, 2014, He was called up to the England U19 squad following an impressive start to the campaign. He made his debut for England U19 in the 1–1 draw against Germany U19. In the game and assisted the opening goal for England.On October of last year, which ironically was Nigeria’s independence, he was included in Roy Hodgson’s squad for the final UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying matches against Estonia and Lithuania. His debut against the former on October 9, he came in as a late substitute in a 2–0 win. OnNovember 17, Alli made his first start for the England senior team, scoring a terrific opening goal from a long range shot to beat Spurs team-mate, goalkeeper Hugo Lloris in a 2–0 win against France at Wembly Stadium.Alli was a Liverpool fan growing up, and Steven Gerrard was his childhood hero.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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first_imgMoylan, 40, last played for the Braves in 2018 but only appeared in 39 games and pitched 28.1 innings. He has also had stints with with Dodgers and Royals during his 11-year career. Related News Red Sox sign formerly banned RP Jenrry Mejia to minor-league deal, report says Mejia, 29, was permanently suspended from MLB in 2016 for testing positive for steroids multiple times when he was a member of the Mets. However, he was reinstated in 2018. He didn’t make any appearances for New York last season and was released by the team in November.Prior to being banned, Mejia posted a 3.65 ERA with 28 saves during the 2014 season. Hows my offseason going? This guy had a lifetime ban and still signed before me!!! #wtf https://t.co/NhzCAiePbT— Peter Moylan (@PeterMoylan) January 30, 2019″Hows my offseason going? This guy had a lifetime ban and still signed before me!!!” Moylan wrote. Peter Moylan is less than pleased with Boston’s recent acquisition.The free-agent relief pitcher ripped the Red Sox after the team signed formerly banned right-handed pitcher Jenrry Mejia to a minor-league deal on Tuesday, tweeting his frustrations about the controversial signing.last_img read more

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