June 24, 2020
  • 9:54 am Sam Houston State and Houston Baptist Provide Indoor Season’s First Weekly Award Winners
  • 9:52 am Southland Announces 2019 All-Conference Football Teams
  • 9:50 am APACHE PRINCESS, KOOKIE GAL & LAKERBALL ALL LOOM LARGE IN MONDAY’S $200,000 CALIFORNIA CUP OAKS AT ONE MILE ON TURF
  • 9:48 am GINOBILI, RAGING WHISKEY & MR. TIP ALL PROMINENT IN SUNDAY’S $100,000 SPEAKEASY STAKES FOR 2-YEAR-OLDS AT FIVE FURLONGS ON GRASS
  • 7:16 pm Official: Carrasco is already Atlético and will enter the call against Madrid

first_imgAPACHE PRINCESS, KOOKIE GAL & LAKERBALL ALL LOOM LARGE IN MONDAY’S $200,000 CALIFORNIA CUP OAKS AT ONE MILE ON TURF RACE IS PART OF LUCRATIVE GOLDEN STATE SERIES FOR CALIFORNIA-BRED OR SIRED RUNNERS ARCADIA, Calif. (Feb. 15, 2019)–Keith Desormeaux’s Apache Princess, Peter Miller’s Kookie Gal and Doug O’Neill’s Lakerball all loom large in Monday’s $200,000 California Cup Oaks at Santa Anita.  Restricted to 3-year-old fillies bred or sired in California, the Cal Cup Oaks, which has attracted a field of nine, is part of the lucrative Golden State Series, which is sponsored by the CTBA.With two consecutive wins at 6 ½ furlongs down Santa Anita’s hillside turf course and a close second three starts back at a one mile turf maiden race at Del Mar Nov. 10, Apache Princess looks like the logical top selection as she bids for three wins in a row.A first out maiden winner going one mile over the Santa Anita turf Oct. 18, Kookie Gal, who is owned by her breeders, Wachtel Stable and Gary Barber, was an impressive winner of the state-bred Soviet Problem Stakes at one mile on dirt two starts back at Los Alamitos and comes off a nose defeat at one mile on dirt here on Jan. 11.A winner of the one mile turf Surfer Girl Stakes in open company here three starts back on Oct. 8, Lakerball was a galloping minor stakes winner going a mile on turf at Golden Gate Fields Oct. 27 and has been freshened by O’Neill since well beaten in the Grade III Jimmy Durante Stakes at Del Mar Nov. 24.APACHE PRINCESSOwner:  KMN Racing, LLCTrainer:  Keith DesormeauxBy the late superstar California-based stallion Unusual Heat, Apache Princess, who is out of the Indian Charlie mare Puskita, was bred by her owners and is not only in sharp recent form, but she appears to possess the right “sit and pounce” style.  The second leading money earner in the field with $111,960, she has two wins and as many seconds from five starts and will be ridden for the sixth consecutive time by Desormeaux’s brother, Kent.KOOKIE GALOwner:  Wachtel Stable & Gary BarberTrainer:  Peter MillerA dark bay or brown filly by Boisterous, out of the Comic Strip mare Kukaluka, she was beaten a scant nose on Jan. 11 by talented Calf Moon Bay and is a proven commodity at the distance, as all four of her starts have been at one mile–two on dirt and two on grass.  With two wins and a second from four starts, she has earnings of $103,820 and rates a huge chance with Flavien Prat riding back.LAKERBALLOwner:  Pappas Horse Racing Corp., Purple Rein Racing & Tom RobertsTrainer: Doug O’NeillBy the Unusual Heat stallion Lakerville, she’s out of the Capsized mare Category Ten.  Following her head victory in the Surfer Girl Stakes here on Oct. 8, she was the even money favorite in the one mile turf Pikes Place Dancer Stakes at Golden Gate, a one mile turf race she took by five lengths.  Freshened since a 7 ¼ length defeat in the Grade III Jimmy Durante Nov. 24, Lakerball has two wins from three tries at a mile on turf and will be making her seventh career start on Monday.  With three wins from six starts, she’s the leading money earner in the field with $129,825.THE CALIFORNIA CUP OAKS WITH JOCKEYS & WEIGHTS IN POST POSITION ORDERRace 5 of 9 Approximate post time 2:30 p.m. PTLippy–Mario Gutierrez–124Mucho Unusual–Joel Rosario–120Tiz a Master–Heriberto Figueroa–122Kookie Gal–Flavien Prat–124Silk From Heaven–Eswan Flores–120Hot On the Trail–Drayden Van Dyke–120Creative Instinct–Brice Blanc–124Lakerball–Rafael Bejarano–124Apache Princess–Kent Desormeaux–126First post time for a nine-race card on Monday is at 12:30p.m. please visitsanttaanita.com  or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

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first_imgLights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew READ: Rike doesn’t mind physicality but not dirty plays“That’s unfair because we also receive those kinds of hits,” said Ayo in Filipino Sunday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan. “Everything we’re doing is within the bounds of basketball rules so I think that’s unfair.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissRike went up against the likes of Germy Mahinay, Enrique Caunan, and Ira Bataller but it was Mahinay whom the Bulldog forward had some heated moments with.Mahinay and Rike got into it in the fourth quarter during a dead ball situation after the UST center pushed off JV Gallego away from the Growling Tigers’ huddle. Ayo said Rike’s statement might have been due to the different culture he was raised in.Rike grew up in the United States and studied his undergrad at Wake Forest.“I think it also depends on the culture,” said Ayo. “That’s why I don’t like recruiting Filipino-Americans except for Fil-Ams who really play like Filipinos.”“That’s why I like players from the Visayas, the guys from the south, and also the guys from Manila who really have that resilient spirit.”ADVERTISEMENT Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown MOST READ LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNational University forward Troy Rike decried the roughing up University of Santo Tomas big men, he claimed, did against him in the second round of the UAAP Season 81 men’s basketball tournament.Rike was on the receiving end of what he said were some elbows and knees during their 69-61 win but Growling Tigers head coach Aldin Ayo said the forward’s statements were “unfair.”ADVERTISEMENT Rike doesn’t mind physicality in UAAP but not dirty playscenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? View comments Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plumlast_img read more

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first_imgStaring at a scene she had never seen before, the realization of what was happening and about to happen in her life hit her like a blow.”Oh God, I can’t handle this. I want to go home,” Tina Swen mourned.On November 2014, Tina landed on the soil of Liberia after spending19 years of her life in America. Now 20 years-old and in total ignorance to Africa and its culture; Tina knew that her life was now over.According to the tall and athletic basketball player, when she was 14 years of age, she had a friend she had known for a very short period that would change her life forever. Because of that friend she says she has left her comfort zone and now finds herself back in Africa.”I told her that I’d always have her back, so she used me into getting even with old enemies, which led me into doing time and eventually getting sent back,” Tina said, shrugging her shoulders.It seems as if Tina’s memory of her childhood friend still haunts her. You can see the tears catching in the corner of her eyes when she has to recall her story.”She ruined my life eternally. Now I am here in the middle of nowhere, around people I don’t know nor understand,” she says in confusion.Tina spent 10 years in jail for assault, she says; and though she learned her lesson behind bars, she thinks there’s still another lesson to learn.” I spent too much time behind bars to know if I’ve truly changed. The real lesson at hand is being back here in the middle of nowhere. What will I do, who will look out for me; how will I survive,” she asked.A challenge that many deportees face when returning back home is not having stability. Some become so fruastrated with their siuation that they relapse and fall victim to crime, violence and drugs.”I don’t know what’s going to happen to me tomorrow, let alone after this interview is done. When you’re gone and I’m faced with loneliness, I guess I have to do what I gotta do to survive out here,” she suggested.As of now, there aren’t any safe homes for deportees or returnees who return back to Liberia. According to Tina, she was not given any money by Homeland security upon her release at the airport.”I don’t have anything, only a few bar’s of soap, lotion and the clothes I wore to go to court following 10 years of jail term. I’m depending on you to help me find a home cause without you, I’m done; lost,” she said, tears streaming down her face.Meanwhile, Tina says after going through what she has been through in the past 10 years of her life, she has a lot of psychological difficulties.”I was 14 years-old when I went to prison and it was in there that I got raped, turned out and inititated into lesbianism. I left my girl back home who took care of me and even brought me the things that I came back here with,” Tina added, ” People saw me at the airport and called me all kinds of names because of how I look and act. It’s disturbing being out here, I’ll need help to cope with this,” she said.Tina’s future is unclear and knowing how to trace her relatives has become a problem. In 1990 she says, her mother was reported missing after she stopped communicating with her relatives abroad.”When we came to America in the 80s, my mom used to call us all the time, along with my older brother. But around 1990, the calls stopped coming and we never heard from them again,” she said, adding that “…when I got locked up, well, my father turned his back on me because he was scared immagration would deport him because of my behavior.”Tina stands alone, dressed in a pair of baggy jeans, a prison t-shirt and a head full of braided hair, Tina needs help.” I’m looking all around this place hoping that someone will look into my eyes and see the good in me and take me in. For the past week, I’ve been sleeping around the airport in a shed with this old lady. I pay her but this is’nt life. I paid for the crime I committed and did 10 years of my life behind bars. Why am I doing time all over again? Why am I back here?” she wailed.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgIPI members, distinguished guests, colleagues …What a privilege it is to welcome you here today. Many of you either were not here or … unlike me … aren’t old enough to remember when IPI held its last World Congress in Cape Town … exactly 20 years ago.How times have changed.Twenty years ago, the vast majority of South Africans had few rights, were excluded from the country’s immense prosperity, and the media were under horrific pressure not to rock the boat. In many other African nations … like Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania … journalists struggled under the grip of strongmen. Today, these countries boast some of the most dynamic media markets on the continent.Twenty years ago, we were welcoming new IPI members from a wave of young democracies in Europe … and celebrating the media’s role as guardian of the transition to democracy in many parts of Latin America.Twenty years ago, many of the world’s strongest media were found in the leading economic powers. Today, as they struggle to find their place in the digital world, traditional and new media are thriving in many parts of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East… and might grow even more if freed of the clutches of government control.And speaking of the digital world, we pay homage this year to the 20th anniversary of the invention of the worldwide web.For all the changes these past two decades, the challenges have not gone away… nor has the need for great organizations like the International Press Institute.When IPI was last in Cape Town, it was relatively easy to halt a newspaper… you break the presses, confiscate the press run or put a lock on the newspaper office. That still happens. Just recently in Sudan, security agents confiscated the pressruns of nearly a dozen newspapers. In Egypt, they outlawed the Freedom and Justice newspaper and several broadcasters. In Venezuela, the government restricted foreign currency exchanges that affected imports of newsprint, effectively forcing newspapers to limit pressruns or suspend publishing altogether.Today, digital media is playing the role of the old samizdat. Social media fuelled the Arab Spring, last year’s Turkish protests, and Ukraine’s most recent revolution … but also helped journalists stay ahead of the story.Yet those who fear journalism have kept up the pressure. In Jordan, where we met a year ago, the government blocked scores of websites within weeks after our Congress ended and some of those remain blocked today for not having government licenses. In February, Turkish leaders approved measures that, unless amended, give the government power to block websites without judicial oversight and to engage in mass surveillance of Internet users. The Syrian Electronic Army… an ad hoc hacker group that backs the Assad government… has played havoc with opposition as well as foreign media, including the Financial Times and The New York Times.When IPI was in Ethiopia last year on a press freedom mission, websites of opposition media and human rights groups were blocked. Ethiopian journalists told us that the security forces shut down the government-run mobile phone network whenever they want to pre-empt anti-government demonstrations organized through text messages.Meanwhile, our business remains a profoundly dangerous one. Just look at Syria, the deadliest country for our profession for two years running … 16 journalists killed in 2013 and 39 the year earlier. Dozens more have been wounded or held captive.Even in countries not in the throes of a terrible civil war, like Syria, journalists walk with targets on their backs. In the Philippines, at least 13 journalists died on the job last year, 11 in India and six in Brazil. All in all, IPI tracked 119 journalists killed in the line of duty… a slight decline from the 133 who died in 2012 but nonetheless an appalling toll. So far this year, more than 20 have either been killed while on the job or died while on duty.IPI is not standing idle when it comes to safety. We’ve pushed the Mexican authorities to improve security for media workers covering drug lords and organized crime. We’ve also pressed the government to end impunity by launching swift investigations into attacks or threats against media and journalists.In January, an emergency IPI delegation went to Cairo to urge the government… including the foreign minister and state information chief… to halt indiscriminate attacks on journalists by the police and vigilantes.Yet journalists face other challenges, perhaps less violent, but no less alarming. Governments have an arsenal of laws that are being turned against our colleagues … laws on sedition and terrorism, for instance. Criminal defamation and insult laws are another example. But more about this later.Twenty years ago, South Africans knew all too well the tricks that oppressors use to silence a free press. Back then, the transformation to a multiracial democracy had not yet taken place. South Africa had a brand new constitution when this Congress last met here, but it was untested and one too many laws restricting press freedom remained on the books … and do so to this day. Criminal defamation is one of them.David Laventhol, the IPI chairman at the time, wrote a beautiful speech for the 1994 Congress. He said: “There are many different cultures represented here, but our mission is a common one: to protect the rights of journalists and the free flow of information everywhere. The subject matter for our deliberation is Africa, a continent that is a mighty mix of cultures, religions, politics and changing ways of life. And of course, one special focus is the Republic of South Africa.”“Of all the places we could be on the globe this year,” he continued, “this is perhaps the most appropriate. A changing society which is headed towards multi-racial democracy after generations without it; a country where, throughout all its troubles, courageous people reported and edited and spoke the truth, as best they could under immense pressure and sometimes threats to their personal safety.”I would like to take a moment to honour those South African journalists … those brave enough to fight the injustice of apartheid … including one who is here today … Mathatha Tsedu.  [Round of applause]Mathatha is not alone, by any means. Many African journalists carry on that tradition of determination. Anas Aremeyaw Anas of Ghana and Joseph Mwenda of Zambia as well as our own Ferial Haffajee, who helped make this Congress possible, are some of them. [Round of applause]We are also honoured to have representatives from Al-Monitor, the recipient of our Free Media Pioneer Award, and Mashallah Shamsolvaezin, the courageous Iranian journalist who is our World Press Freedom Hero this year.  Welcome to both.Back to David Laventhol. As he noted in his Cape Town speech, South Africa was preparing for elections. Again today, we are on the eve of elections and their impact on South Africa is no less important. We have just heard Minister Chabane speak on behalf of President Jacob Zuma … we thank him for his warm welcome to South Africa and we are honored to be here in this great land of hope.But we say to President Zuma, please do not cheat us of that hope. Parliament last November approved and sent to the president the Protection of State Information Bill, also known as the “secrecy bill”, which in our view gives too much authority to politicians to determine what is confidential information.  It also lacks a public interest defence, which would directly impact whistleblowers and journalists who obtain information through their confidential sources.We strongly urge the President to veto the “secrecy bill” and send it back to the Parliament for reconsideration – before the election. Doing so would send the message that South Africa is determined to protect freedom of the press and defend the right of the public to access information that affects their lives.There has also been no progress under the African National Congress-led government in banning defamation and insult laws… a horrible legacy of the apartheid era. The Table Mountain Declaration… signed right here in Cape Town in 2007 with IPI’s backing… calls for abolishing criminal defamation and insult laws in Africa. Only two African leaders have signed it… President Issoufou of Niger and President Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia.It’s not too late for President Zuma to add his name and personal commitment to abolish these heinous laws.Doing so is not just important to South Africa. It is important to all of Africa and beyond because it sends the message that Africans can be global leaders on this issue… as Ghana did when it abolished criminal defamation more than a decade ago.Yet for all the progress in Africa … and much progress has been made… terrific challenges still remain.Just look at Ethiopia. Our board members, Ferial Haffaje and Kiburu Yusuf, were there with me when we tried to visit five journalists imprisoned on terrorism charges. When we were there last November, these journalists were being denied access to their lawyers, their friends and their colleagues. One of them, a courageous young woman named Reeyot Alemu, is battling breast cancer from her prison cell. Her struggle and that of her colleagues … Solomon Kebede, Wubset Taye, Eskinder Nega and Yusuf Getachew… brought tears to the eyes of members of our delegation who spoke with those closest to them.Ethiopia’s neighbor, Somalia, remains Africa’s most dangerous country for journalists… at least 24 journalists have been killed there since the start of 2012. Meanwhile, Eritrea’s dictator has literally locked away journalists and thrown away the key… some of our colleagues have languished in prisons for years. Some have died in confinement.This week the world is marking the 20th anniversary of the start of the Rwanda genocide. As a series of commentaries we published this past week showed, some local media played a terrible role in fanning ethnic hatred in 1994. While there is no defence for such hate speech, we are concerned that the Rwandan authorities use that experience to maintain tight control over today’s news media and call on the government to allow independent media to flourish.A few moments ago I mentioned the scourge of criminal defamation and insult laws. In Angola, journalists who step out of line regularly face the cudgel of criminal defamation. Rafael Marques, who will be speaking here at the Congress, wrote a report alleging involvement of high-level government officials in abuses of mining workers. Angolan prosecutors have harassed him for a year, accusing him of criminal defamation. IPI and a coalition of our partners have rallied in his defence… for example, by pressuring the European Union, a main trading partner and aid donor, to demand accountability from Angola’s autocrats for harassing Marques and other journalists.Even in countries with relatively strong constitutional foundations for press freedom, there is a tendency to flaunt laws. Governments in Tanzania and Uganda have dredged up old press laws to suspend newspapers… damaging these publications’ reputations and financial stability.Kenya is another concern. President Kenyatta has signed legislation… the Information and Communication Act… that we believe would lead to state control of news and information during emergencies, plus give the government the power to perform functions currently executed by the country’s Media Council. We’ve protested these measures and Kenyan journalists are not about to have their rights trampled on. They’ve filed legal challenges against the Information and Communication Act on the grounds that it is unconstitutional.Elsewhere in Africa, we’ve led the campaign against the use of sedition laws to arrest and intimidate journalists in The Gambia and Sierra Leone.And in Egypt these past few months, dozens of journalists have been detained, sometimes for days or months without being indicted. Recently 20 were put on trial for charges such as reporting “false news” or aiding terrorists. And IPI member Al Jazeera has borne the brunt of the government’s wrath, with no less than four journalists still in jail on trumped-up charges.Elsewhere, Morocco has to stand out as one of the more bizarre cases we’ve handled in recent months. Ali Anouzla, whom many of you might know as editor of Lakome.com, was arrested last September and is now on trial for “glorifying terrorism”. What did he do? Anouzla published a news article that included a link to a YouTube video posted on the website of El País in Spain. The video was removed by YouTube, but it allegedly accused King Mohammed of corruption and despotism, and urged young Moroccans to engage in jihad. IPI has joined with more than 40 other organizations in calling for the charges to be dropped.In the Middle East, we’ve seen the great promise of the Arab Spring wither in many countries. I’ve already mentioned the terrible death toll for our colleagues in Syria.But the Arab Spring has also delivered some advances for press freedom. Tunisian and Egyptian voters have adopted promising constitutions with strong guarantees of press freedom. We challenge leaders in both countries to live by the spirit of these constitutions and to adjust national laws to the new guarantees … and then abide by those laws.Press freedom is under siege in other areas as well.In the last few months, we have seen upheavals in Venezuela where government forces have assaulted at least 78 journalists. Fourteen national and international journalists were arrested. In some cases, journalists were taken into custody despite showing their press credentials and media equipment. A few were held for hours incommunicado and then released. Some journalists were threatened even as they were freed from detention.At least 13 cases of theft took place… with the police seizing photos and film showing violence between government forces and protesters.  By our count, there were at least 10 separate cases of censorship against national news outlets carried out by the government agency in charge of regulating broadcast media in Venezuela. Colombian news channel NTN24, which has a station in Caracas, was ordered off the air on February 12 after reporting on protests taking place across the country.  At the same time, Venezuelan President Maduro threatened CNN en Español and ordered press credentials be taken away from three of its reporters.Turning to Brazil. Since last year, eight journalists have been killed in incidents directly linked to their work as members of the press. Impunity reigns in Brazil when it comes to crimes committed against journalists. Press freedom advocates report that a law already in place could federalize investigations on crimes against journalists … yet this law is not strictly enforced today. Although there are efforts by Brazil’s Human Rights Secretariat to get input from local press groups, it is our responsibility to bring light to these inconsistencies that undermine freedom of the press.Last year, after years of advocacy by IPI and other groups, the Mexican government finally put into practice two critical institutional measures designed to protect journalist safety and combat impunity. Unfortunately, the government’s performance leaves much to be desired. Just ask renowned investigative journalist Anabel Hernández, whose home was stormed by 11 armed assailants in December. Or the family of Gregorio Jimenez de la Cruz, a Veracruz reporter kidnapped and murdered in February. We remind Mexico that new laws and programmes mean nothing unless they are backed up by action.With respect to the Caribbean, media independence in Cuba continues to be hampered by government officials. At least 19 journalists have been forced into exile since 2008. As IPI’s World Press Freedom Hero, Yoani Sánchez, has said: the journalism community in Cuba must “shed its political commitments and take on the truth as its only obligation.”I am thrilled to report that IPI’s campaign to repeal criminal defamation laws has already met with great success. Last November, Jamaica became the first Caribbean country to completely abolish criminal defamation. Grenada, along with Trinidad and Tobago, have also taken steps to partially decriminalize defamation. We are hopeful that governments in Antigua and Barbuda… and the Dominican Republic… will honor public commitments and follow suit.Despite these fantastic accomplishments, the Caribbean faces several troubling trends on the press freedom front … including a new wave of electronic defamation laws that threaten citizens’ rights to self-expression online. Secrecy laws are another area of concern: under a bill pending in the British Virgin Islands, journalists could face up to 15 years in prison for publishing sensitive computer data.In Asia, too, press freedom has witnessed many successes and too many defeats. The most astonishing success of the last few years remains Myanmar, where only four years ago we had little hope that press freedom may ever become a reality. Today, after the state censorship office was abolished and most journalists and political prisoners were released from prison, the government is in the process of developing a new legal framework for the media that promises to guarantee a good degree of press freedom. Challenges nevertheless remain and, as I speak, four journalists and one publisher are facing trial for revealing state secrets in connection with an article on an alleged chemical weapon factory.In numerous East and South-East Asian countries … older democracies such as Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, India, the Philippines … and newer democracies … such as Indonesia and Mongolia – appear to remain stable and journalism remains strong in its watchdog function.Nevertheless, threats to press freedom linger in the established democracies. For instance, Japan approved a special state secret law in December 2013. The new law was hailed by Washington, which had long pushed Japan to exert tighter control on classified information. But journalists in Japan say the law is too vague and open to abuse … and represents a serious obstacle to the dissemination of information of public interest.China remains a repressive country. More than 30 journalists and bloggers remain in prison in China and foreign journalists have been facing increasing difficulties in getting a visa to work in the country. Despite these challenges, journalists in China have continued to push the limits.Nine journalists were killed last year in Pakistan, 13 in the Philippines, 11 in India… and three in Afghanistan. In many Asian countries, the authorities fail to address threats and crimes against journalists. Violence has become a powerful deterrent to the coverage of certain sensitive issues.The continued forced exile of so many Sri Lankan journalists… and the Sri Lankan government’s repression of critical voices in the country even after the civil war that ended in 2009… raises concerns that democracy may not be restored any time soon. Tragically, 30 years of civil war has left little space for independent news.In Thailand, the editor of the banned Voice of Taksin is serving an 11-year sentence because of two articles he wrote that were perceived as offensive towards the country’s royal family. This case is a reminder of the threat that criminal defamation and insult laws represent for press freedom. Thailand has turned a deaf ear to repeated appeals by international organizations, including the UN, to amend its laws against insulting the monarchy.There is little progress to report in Central Asia… where governments use an arsenal of tactics to intimidate and silence journalists, including imprisonment, criminal charges, forced closure of newspapers, the blocking of websites… and impunity in crimes against journalists.In Europe, former Soviet republics remain some of the most difficult in which to practice journalism.Impunity flourishes in Russia, where the vast majority of the 64 journalists’ deaths IPI that has recorded there since 1997 remain unsolved. Four journalists died in connection with their work in 2013… two gunned down, two succumbing to the effects of savage beatings they suffered years ago.Since Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency in 2012, Russia has re-criminalized defamation, created an Internet blacklist, expanded the definition of treason, prohibited discussion of homosexuality that isn’t negative, converted one of the largest news agencies into a pro-Russian public relations firm, and annexed Crimea, where journalists have been menaced by masked gunmen in uniforms without insignia and pro-Russian militia.Meanwhile, Ukraine still reels from the effects of a revolution in which observers recorded more than 120 attacks on domestic and foreign journalists this year.Belarus remains a totalitarian state where journalists are routinely detained or summoned to appear before authorities, and self-censorship is the norm in the Caucasus, particularly in Azerbaijan, where independent media continue to face pressure.Throughout the Balkans, journalists confronted issues of corruption, media concentration and monopolization, as well as physical attacks. In Greece, SEEMO [South East Europe Media Organization] measured a sharp increase in attacks, many of which were attributed to alleged supporters of the xenophobic, right-wing Golden Dawn party.Journalists in Hungary struggle with the effects of both an ailing economy and legislation centralizing regulatory authority in the hands of parliament, while Turkey remains the world’s leading jailer of journalists. Some 44 are still behind bars, most on what appear to be politically-motivated claims of connections to terrorists or armed groups.Media owners’ economic dependence on government connections continues to stifle reporting in Turkey, as did the reported attacks by police on dozens of journalists as they covered protests that erupted last year following the brutal treatment of demonstrators opposing the demolition of Gezi Park in Istanbul. In recent months, a growing corruption scandal has led to the release online of wiretapped conversations allegedly revealing government willingness to apply direct pressure on both the media and the judiciary to achieve political goals. Authorities went so far as to shut down Twitter and YouTube in an apparent bid to staunch that flow of information ahead of local elections.Media in Western Europe generally fared better. But journalists in Italy still faced attacks and intimidation, as well as the very real threat of imprisonment under criminal defamation provisions – provisions with analogues in criminal codes across the continent.As the United Kingdom continued to deal with fallout from the News of the World phone-hacking scandal and disclosures by Edward Snowden, IPI and other leading international press freedom groups warned of the dangers of previously unthinkable regulatory proposals and of criminal investigations targeting The Guardian, reminding Prime Minister David Cameron that his government’s actions could be used to justify media restrictions elsewhere in the world.The United States was the scene of similarly unthinkable developments. In addition to Snowden’s disclosures, the Justice Department acknowledged that it secretly subpoenaed Associated Press journalists’ records and obtained a warrant for a Fox News reporter’s private communications on the grounds that talking a State Department official into sharing information on North Korea made the journalist a co-conspirator to espionage.U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder issued new guidelines on handling investigations involving reporters, but federal prosecutors continued to argue in court that the First Amendment creates no privilege, at least in criminal cases, allowing journalists to protect a confidential source’s identity. Senators considered enacting a federal law on source confidentiality, but a bill to do so remains stalled – the victim of a political process paralyzed by partisan strife.Meanwhile, the White House’s efforts to control news coverage led 38 U.S. media organizations to sign a letter protesting limits on photojournalists’ access to the president.Twenty years ago, IPI held its World Congress in South Africa … in part to celebrate freedom, but also to show that we stood on guard to defend those freedoms everywhere in the world.The transitions that were beginning in Africa, in Europe, in Latin America and in Asia would not be easy … and we continue to see far too many obstacles to press freedom today. For every Tunisia, with its promising new constitution, there is a Russia, where those in power tighten their grip on the media. For all the successes of our Campaign to Abolish Criminal Defamation in the Caribbean, there are countries around the world that continue to use it in a sinister effort to hush journalists.Just weeks before he became president, Nelson Mandela was here… at the IPI World Congress. He gave a touching endorsement of why IPI and press freedom matter. As tempting as it is to read Nelson Mandela’s gently eloquent speech in full, let me highlight one excerpt that embodies why we are here today.He said: “A critical, independent and investigative press is the lifeblood of any democracy. The press must be free from state interference. It must have the economic strength to stand up to the blandishments of government officials. It must have sufficient independence from vested interests to be bold and inquiring, without fear or favour. It must enjoy the protection of the Constitution, so that it can protect our rights as citizens.”Twenty years on, we still have our work cut out for us. This Congress will demonstrate the challenges, as well as the potential to fight back. Thank you all for your support this past year, your participation in this important congress… and your determination to carry on in the years ahead in defence of journalists around the world.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img Diego Lopez Liverpool are locked in a three-way battle with AC Milan and Napoli to sign Real Madrid goalkeeper Diego Lopez, according to Spanish newspaper El Confidencial.Reds boss Brendan Rodgers wants to bring in a new goalkeeper to provide competition to Simon Mignolet, with long-serving Anfield favourite Pepe Reina preparing to complete his move to Bayern Munich.And the Northern Irishman is reportedly keen on Lopez, who has been instructed to find a new club by Bernabeu chiefs after the European champions signed Costa Rica World Cup star Keylor Navas from Levante.However, the Reds must fend off competition from Italy, with Milan and Napoli, who are managed by former Liverpool boss Rafa Benitez, also in pursuit of Lopez.Although Milan’s interest in the goalkeeper is the strongest, it is thought their bid to sign him is hindered by the fact they will not be competing in Europe this season.Lopez, 32, arrived at Real Madrid halfway through the 2012/13 campaign and became the club’s first-choice goalkeeper in La Liga, while long-serving club legend Iker Casillas kept his place in cup competitions. 1last_img read more

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first_imgCraig Burley claims summer signing Cesc Fabregas has given Chelsea a creative spark they didn’t have last season.The former Arsenal captain was outstanding on his Premier League debut for the Blues, having a hand in all of their goals in the 3-1 win over Burnley.Reflecting on the victory at Turf Moor on The Sports Bar, ex-Blues midfielder Burley said: “He performed so well, Fabregas. I think he will be a great signing.“Chelsea were one of the poorer sides last season in terms of midfielders threading balls through to forward positions to strikers and here is a guy who will absolutely bring that to the table.”Burley was impressed by Chelsea as a whole against Burnley, and reckons it will be a straight fight for the title between them and Manchester City, who beat Newcastle 2-0 in their opening game of the season.“I know it was against a team that are tipped to be in a relegation football, but I thought the football they played in the first half was excellent,” he said.“Chelsea and Manchester City have shown in the two games already why they have got that little bit more than Arsenal, Liverpool and certainly Manchester United.”last_img read more

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first_img0Shares0000Paris Saint-Germain forward Kylian Mbappe (R) celebrates with Angel Di Maria (L) and Neymar (C) after scoring during their match against Ligue 1 rivals Rennes © AFP / LOIC VENANCEPARIS, France, Jan 8 – Neymar, Kylian Mbappe and Angel Di Maria all scored twice as a rampant Paris Saint-Germain shrugged off the absence of Edinson Cavani to win 6-1 away to Ligue 1 rivals Rennes in the French Cup on Sunday.PSG are bidding to win the trophy for the fourth season running, something no club has ever done before, and they showed Rennes no pity in Brittany. Leading scorer Cavani was not involved after returning late from his Christmas and New Year break in Uruguay, so Di Maria came into the attack alongside Mbappe and Neymar.Mbappe opened the scoring inside nine minutes, finishing after being picked out by Thiago Silva’s long ball over the top.A brilliantly worked goal saw PSG double their lead, with Adrien Rabiot and Marco Verratti combining to tee up Neymar for the finish.Di Maria turned in a Yuri Berchiche cross from the left for the third goal midway through the first half and the pick of the bunch came as Neymar made it 4-0 two minutes from half-time.PSG started the move in their own penalty box before Neymar broke downfield and eventually applied the finish from Mbappe’s pass.Rennes did pull one back in the second half from a Benjamin Bourigeaud penalty after a Thiago Motta handball, but there was still time for Unai Emery’s side to score twice more.Mbappe set up Di Maria to make it five and the Argentine returned the favour with an assist for Mbappe to complete the rout.PSG have now won their last 34 consecutive domestic cup ties, a run they can extend further as they go to Amiens in the League Cup quarter-finals on Wednesday.Ligue 1 clubs were entering the French Cup in their first outings of 2018 after a two-and-a-half-week winter break, and most of the leading sides made it through.Guido Carrillo scored a hat-trick as Monaco won 5-2 at fourth-tier Yzeure on Saturday, while Maxwel Cornet’s last-gasp free-kick saw Lyon win 3-2 at Ligue 2 side Nancy and a Jordan Amavi goal in extra time gave Marseille a 1-0 victory at home to second-tier Valenciennes.With Mario Balotelli out and Wesley Sneijder allowed to leave to complete a move to Al Gharafa of Qatar, Nice were beaten 1-0 at Toulouse.The biggest shock came as Bordeaux went down 2-1 away to fourth-tier Granville in Normandy despite having taken the lead through Younousse Sankhare.Last season’s beaten finalists Angers were also eliminated, losing 2-0 at home to second-tier Lorient.The draw for the round of 32 will be held on Monday evening.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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first_img1 It was Mauricio Pochettino’s 100th match in charge of the north Londoners Mauricio Pochettino insists he does not regret fielding a weakened team despite Borussia Dortmund thrashing Tottenham 3-0 in the Europa League last 16.Harry Kane was left on the bench at the Westfalenstadion as Pochettino played Nacer Chadli up front and Ryan Mason and Tom Carroll in midfield and handed 18-year-old Josh Onomah only his fourth start of the season.The decision to rest some of his top players, with Mousa Dembele also on the bench and Eric Dier left at home, backfired as Marco Reus’ double and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang’s header all but ended Spurs’ hopes of progress.“No regrets,” Pochettino said.“I’m very disappointed with the result but we didn’t have a very good day. It was a bad day in the office.“When we analysed the squad and picked the starting eleven we tried to win the game. It started okay but it was a really bad day for us.”The defeat leaves Tottenham with a mountain to climb in the second leg at White Hart Lane but also means Pochettino’s men are now winless in three matches, following last week’s loss at West Ham and draw with Arsenal.A trip to bottom-of-the-table Aston Villa on Sunday offers the perfect chance to bounce back as Spurs look to resume a title challenge that has them sitting five points behind league leaders Leicester.“I am not worried, I know the circumstances,” Pochettino said.“We need to accept some periods during 10 months that we will have good and bad times. We have always had things good.“It has only been in the last few games not so much. The players are very sad but we have to take the positives.“We have a big challenge against Aston Villa on Sunday. We are in a very good position in the league and we will do our best.”Placed second in the table, Tottenham will hope to face similar opposition more regularly in the Champions League next season.But while similarities were drawn between the two sides’ style of play, league position and low-budget squads before kick-off, Dortmund demonstrated Spurs still have a way to go to compete with the European elite.“I think they had a good experience but we spoke yesterday and I told them that to play at the next level you compete with teams like Borussia Dortmund, which is a real test,” Pochettino said.“It was good for us to feel what a game in the Champions League feels like.“It was disappointing because the result was bad but to build a group for the next few years to compete at the level of Borussia Dortmund is very difficult.“We were disappointed but it was a very good test for us to compare the level.”READ: ‘Mauricio Pochettino has to take this one on the chin – he got it wrong’ – Tottenham fans on manager’s selection in Europa League defeatlast_img read more

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first_img 10 4. Marcelo Brozovic (Inter Milan) – Another man already impressing in France at Euro 2016 is the Croat midfielder. Luka Modric stole the show with his volley but right-sided star Brozovic was industrious and skilful, creating and getting on the end of chances as he darted in from the flank. He couldn’t get on the scoresheet but admirers, who include Tottenham, Chelsea, Arsenal, Atletico Madrid, Bayern Munich and Roma. 8. Kalidou Koulibaly (Napoli) – Senegalese centre-back was a real star in Serie A last season and now is being targeted by a host of top clubs. Arsenal and Chelsea are keen as they attempt to bolster their defences, while Everton have also got an interest but their ability to finance a deal will hinge on the future of John Stones. 5. Alvaro Morata (Juventus) – Spanish forward Morata is currently in transfer limbo. Owned by the Italian champions, he also knows former side Real Madrid are looming, intending to activate his buy-back clause. If he does head back to the Bernabeu, though, it’s likely he’ll be on his bike again and sold to the highest bidder. Arsenal, Chelsea and Manchester United are all monitoring the situation. 2. Toni Kroos (Real Madrid) – The metronomic midfielder was one of the stars of the show as Germany dispatched Ukraine at Euro 2016 in Group C. The cool and collected maestro has a magnificent eye for a pass so it’s no surprise to see Manchester United, who almost signed him in 2013, Chelsea and Juventus all want the technically gifted superstar in their squads. 10 3. Ricardo Rodriguez (Wolfsburg) – Already it’s known the player wants to quit his club in search of European football next season. The Swiss star has several destinations to choose from though as Arsenal, Manchester United, Man City, while Real Madrid retain some interest, although Zinedine Zidane is said to prefer bringing Fabio Coentrao back into the fold rather than signing a new star. 10 10 10 Even Euro 2016 can’t stop the rumour mill from churning out more transfer speculation.Premier League teams are still beavering away attempting to get deals in place, with targets producing good displays in France.Some superstars, though, are more wanted than others, with several clubs chasing their signatures.But who are currently, as the transfer window prepares to open on July 1, the most wanted players this summer?Click the right arrow above to find out… 10 10 10 10 6. Jamie Vardy (Leicester City) – The fairytale came true and the pacy strike star is the Premier League’s king of the counter attack after helping the Foxes to the title with 24 goals. He’s now wanted man as Arsenal, Liverpool and West Ham all attempt to lure him away from the King Power Stadium. 1. N’Golo Kante (Leicester City) – Click the right arrow above for more of the most wanted transfer targets… – The fantastic Foxes star is now taking his skills to the international stage after a stunning Premier League campaign with the title winners. In France’s Euro 2016 opener against Romania, the tireless midfielder was again outstanding. His ability to intercept the ball before ferrying it onto its next destination means interest in his services is high. Liverpool have now joined a list of suitors, which also includes Arsenal, Paris Saint-Germain, Manchester United, Juventus and Real Madrid. 7. Henrikh Mkhitaryan (Borussia Dortmund) – Set to be ditched by the Bundesliga giants as he refuses to pen a new deal with the club, the Armenia assist machine could be available this summer. Arsenal and Manchester United both want to get the player on their books, while Juventus also want to land the 27-year-old who also hit 11 goals in the league last season. 10 9. Leonardo Bonucci (Juventus) – Pep Guardiola rates the centre-back as one of his favourite ever players but, as yet, Manchester City haven’t made a move for the Italy international who is drawing also interesting from Chelsea, where he could link up with Antonio Conte again next season. 10. John Stones (Everton) – The talented young defender continues to be linked with a move away from the Toffees and could be set for another long summer of rumours. Barcelona have apparently been turned down by the player, while Manchester City, Chelsea, Arsenal and Man United also want the England international.last_img read more

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first_img 32 12. Ricardo Vaz Te (Signed: January 2012 – Departed: January 2015) – Forget the fact that Vaz Te was useless in the Premier League, the Portuguese forward will forever be remembered as the man whose playoff final winning goal took West Ham back to the top flight. Signed from Barnsley midway through West Ham’s Championship campaign his goalscoring proved crucial as West Ham pulled themselves back towards England’s top tier. He scored 12 goals for West Ham prior to promotion but the goals soon dried up at a higher level with just seven coming in the following two seasons. Now turning out for Turkish side Akhisar Belediyespor. 32 32 25. Diafra Sakho (Signed: August 2014 – Still at club) – Sakho can be widely considered the second most successful striker on this list despite falling out of favour with Slaven Bilic, having problems with his attitude and coming close to being sold to West Brom. Regardless of the downsides the Senegal striker does do one thing on a regular basis – he scores. His first season at West Ham was particularly impressive under Sam Allardyce, as he scored 12 goals in his first year in England, but his productivity has reduced of late. His second season was stop-start and full of off-field issues while his third season was totally wrecked due to injuries. If Sakho can get fit he could still have a part to play. 29. Simone Zaza (Signed: August 2016 – Departed: January 2017) – After announcing himself to the British public with the slowest penalty run up of all time, for Italy at Euro 2016, Zaza signed for West Ham on loan after scoring against them for Juventus at their new London Stadium home. Unfortunately for West Ham and Zaza that was his last goal for a while as he failed to find the net for his new club. His loan was cut short and he left having scored more times at the London Stadium against West Ham than for them. Was loaned to Spanish side Valencia for the rest of the season and the deal has since been made permanent. 32 32 15. Andy Carroll (Signed: August 2012 [loan] May 2013 [permanent] – Still at club) – Despite seemingly spending every other week injured the big front man is by far the most successful name on this list. Carroll was, and is, the answer to West Ham’s goalscoring issues but the problem the one-time British record signing has is he’s never fit. As such the striker has always showed glimpses of class but his fitness battle prevents him from staying active for prolonged periods of time. Hopefully a day will arrive when Carroll’s injury problems are behind him. Hopefully… 32 22. Marco Borriello (Signed: January 2014 – Departed: May 2014) – After seemingly playing for every Italian side going, journeyman striker Borriello had a stint at West Ham in 2014 when the club, again, needed some important goals. The Italy striker made just two substitute appearances, failed to score, and consigned himself to the hopeless striker list. Still playing his football in Italy, currently at Cagliari. 32 2. Benni McCarthy (Signed: February 2010 – Departed: April 2011) – A Champions League winner with Porto who later made his name in the Premier League with Blackburn Rovers, Benni McCarthy’s spell at West Ham was horrendous. The Hammers spent £5million on the South African in the hunt for goals but his time at Upton Park was characterised by his weight and spats with vice-chairman Karren Brady. McCarthy was labelled a ‘big fat mistake’ and described as ‘a player devoted to filling his belly more than filling the net’ by Brady. He failed to score a single goal and his contract was terminated in April 2011. He has recently been unveiled as the new head coach of Cape Town City. 32 21. Carlton Cole (Signed: October 2013 – May 2015) – After being told he was no longer needed at West Ham, following seven years of service, Cole was resigned by the club just a few months after being released – because they couldn’t find any other strikers. Arguably the most marmite player in West Ham’s history the ex-Chelsea forward is fondly remembered at West Ham for trying despite not possessing that much ability. In his second spell with the club Cole grabbed ten goals in 57 appearances. All in all the front man scored 68 goals in 293 West Ham appearances over nine years. After leaving Cole has since turned out for Celtic, Sacramento Republic and is now on the books at Indonesian side Persib Bandung alongside former Chelsea teammate Michael Essien. 32 31. Antonio Martinez (Signed: July 2016 – still at club) – There is still time for young Toni Martinez to come good for West Ham after a positive loan spell with Oxford United. The 19-year-old Spaniard has been prolific at youth level for the Hammers, after signing from Valencia, and the hopes are high for his future development. Still waiting to make an appearance for Slaven Bilic’s side. 13. Nicky Maynard (Signed: January 2012 – Departed: August 2012) – Bought for £1.7million from Bristol City, Maynard was considered a bright striker that could really improve. However, it didn’t turn out that way and after three goals in 17 games he was soon sold to Cardiff City in August 2012. Maynard is currently a free agent after his two-year spell with MK Dons ended. 32 24. Mauro Zarate (Signed: May 2014 – Departed: January 2016) – This was the second time Gold and Sullivan had signed Zarate after previously bringing him to Birmingham City when they were co-owners at St Andrews. After showing the odd glimpse of quality at Birmingham it was much the same at West Ham as he occasionally showed class before he duly fell out with boss Sam Allardyce. He was shipped off on-loan to QPR and received a brief reprieve with Slaven Bilic before being sold to Fiorentina in January 2016. Now a player at Watford but suffering from a long-term injury. 10. John Carew (Signed: August 2011 – Departed: May 2012) – The big Norwegian is fondly remembered by Aston Villa fans but his time at West Ham was littered with goals. He scored twice in 21 games and subsequently left the club at the end of the season. West Ham were Carew’s final club and he has since tried his hand at acting after retirement. 32 32 32 32 26. Enner Valencia (Signed: July 2014 – still at club) – After starring for Ecuador at the 2014 World Cup Valencia arrived at West Ham whilst admitting he had watched hooligan film Green Street to educate him on his new club. Valencia clearly possesses talent and formed an exciting partnership with Diafra Sakho in his first season but it has petered out since. With next to no end product Valencia spent last season on loan at Everton and now looks to be on the brink of leaving West Ham with Porto interested. 32 32 14. Sean Maguire (Signed: January 2013 – Departed: May 2015) – Maguire signed from Waterford United for an undisclosed fee and failed to make a senior appearance for West Ham. He was soon released to Dundalk where he spent a short amount of time before signing for Cork City. Recent reports suggest Maguire will sign for Preston North End from Cork City this summer. 5. Victor Obinna (Signed: August 2010 – Departed: May 2011) – Obinna arrived at West Ham on loan from Inter Milan and was regarded as a promising young talent. After scoring eight goals in 32 games during West Ham’s relegation season his loan was ended once the campaign concluded. Went on to play for Lokomotiv Moscow, Chievo and MSV Duisburg. The Nigerian is currently a free agent after being released by Darmstadt in January 2017. 32 32 16. Modibo Maiga (Signed: July 2012 – Departed: August 2015) – Signed for West Ham’s first season back in the Premier League from Sochaux, the Mali international showed signs of impressing – but those signs were few and far between. After scoring seven goals, and following two loan spells away from the club, Maiga was shipped off to Al-Nassr of Saudi Arabia. After an uninspiring year he moved to Al-Ittihad Kalba in the UAE where he still plays now. 27. Nikica Jelavic (Signed: August 2015 – Departed: February 2016) – Signed in desperate circumstances the Croatian had failed to inspire in the Premier League for both Everton and Hull City. Excelled during his time at Rangers but Jelavic found the net just twice for West Ham and he was soon sold to Chinese side Beijing Renhe for a tidy profit. 18. Marouane Chamakh (Signed: January 2013 – Departed: May 2013) – Sometimes we often forget the impact Chamakh made for Arsenal when he first arrived in England. Of course that impact soon disappeared and he dropped further and further down the Gunners pecking order until West Ham came calling in January 2013. Throughout his loan spell Chamakh played three times and was sent back to Arsenal before he later moved on to Crystal Palace. Despite staying at Selhurst Park for three seasons his impact, again, fell and he was last seen playing for Cardiff in 2016. 8. Robbie Keane (Signed: January 2011 – Departed: May 2011) – The Irish legend was a prolific Premier League forward who scored goals wherever he went in England’s top flight – except West Ham. Keane arrived on loan from Tottenham after falling down the pecking order as West Ham desperately searched for someone to help save them from relegation. In ten appearances Keane found the back of the net twice. West Ham were relegated and Keane’s loan ended at the end of the season. The striker next moved to LA Galaxy where he remained until 2016. He is currently without a club. 3. Mido (Signed: February 2010 – Departed: June 2010) – A man who had turned out for the likes of Tottenham and Middlesbrough, the Egyptian arrived at West Ham on a four-month loan on transfer deadline day. His goalscoring in the Premier League wasn’t exactly impressive and, to no one’s surprise, he departed after nine appearances and no goals scored. Mido is currently the manager of Egyptian side Wadi Degla. There are few certainties in this world – death, taxes and West Ham hunting for a striker.Since David Gold and David Sullivan took control of the club in 2010 they have been on the lookout for a much needed goalscorer but the statistics show the choices have been dire.Under the two David’s tenure a staggering 32 forwards have been signed – a list of players that have heralded just a handful of successes.Current talk suggests that Manchester City’s Kelechi Iheanacho will be the latest signing to try his hand at being the goal-getter the Hammers so desperately want.Scroll through the gallery above to see the forwards signed since Gold and Sullivan took charge – it doesn’t make for positive reading if you’re a West Ham fan. 32 6. Demba Ba (Signed: January 2011 – Departed: May 2011) – A rare success on this list, even if it was just for a five month stay, Demba Ba’s form for West Ham brought a brief glimpse of hope they could be saved from relegation that season. Ultimately the club didn’t survive the Premier League drop and, after scoring seven goals in 13 appearances, the forward was snapped up by Newcastle United. Continued to deliver for the Magpies before earning a move to Chelsea where his scoring rate dropped. He is currently at Shanghai Shenhua and suffered a horrendous leg break in July 2016. 20. Mladen Petric (Signed: September 2013 – Departed: January 2014) – When you are in desperate need of a forward you will sign anyone – as West Ham showed in September 2013 with the deal that brought free agent Petric to Upton Park after his average spell at Fulham. The Croatian featured four times without scoring and was gone just as quickly as he arrived. He has now retired from football after a spell with Panathinaikos in Greece. 17. Wellington Paulista (Signed: January 2013 – Departed: May 2013) – The forward arrived at West Ham on a six-month loan determined to show that he was one of the best strikers from Brazil. Naturally he never made an appearance for West Ham and he became another forgotten name to have registered for the club. Currently plays on-loan for Chapecoense – the team that tragically lost the majority of their squad in a plane crash in November 2016. 28. Emmanuel Emenike (Signed: January 2016 – Departed: May 2016) – Another strange incoming was Emenike who was brought in on loan from Fenerbahce after spending time playing in the United Arab Emirates. Two goals in 16 appearances was the return and, sure enough, the Nigerian international didn’t stick around for long. 32 32 32 4. Frederic Piquionne (Signed: July 2010 – Departed: March 2013) – After playing for Portsmouth in the Premier League on a season-long loan an Avram Grant led West Ham paid Lyon £1million to bring the French forward to East London. He scored 11 goals in 62 games for the club and was released by West Ham in 2013. He soon joined MLS side Portland Timbers and is still playing football for Indian Super League side Mumbai City. 32 30. Jonathan Calleri (Signed: August 2016 – Departed: May 2017) – Brought in on-loan with a view to a permanent deal the hopes were high for Calleri after he featured for Argentina’s Olympic team at Rio 2016. Again there was a distinct lack of quality and he scored just one goal in a 3-1 victory over Middlesbrough. Unsurprisingly his deal from Deportivo Maldonado was not made permanent at the end of the season. 32 11. Sam Baldock (Signed: August 2011 – Departed: August 2012) – The front man was signed from MK Dons for £2.4million and netted five times during his only season at the club. Was sold the following summer to Bristol City but will soon make his Premier League debut as he is now part of the Brighton and Hove Albion squad that finished runners up in the Championship last season. 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 9. Brian Montenegro (Signed: August 2011 – Departed: May 2012) – Young Paraguay forward Montenegro was hailed as a bright prospect when West Ham signed him following their relegation from the Premier League. He played once – coming on as a late substitute in an FA Cup third round defeat to Sheffield Wednesday – and didn’t score. Montenegro returned to Paraguay after his spell and, other than another loan spell with Leeds United in 2014-15, he has continued to ply his trade in South America. Currently on the books of Paraguayan side Olimpia. 7. Paul McCallum (Signed: January 2011 – Departed: May 2015) – West Ham fans might struggle to recall McCallum considering he never made an appearance for the team after signing for £64,000 from Dulwich Hamlet. Following a heap of uninspiring loans he was eventually allowed to join Leyton Orient for free in 2015. He left the O’s following their relegation out of the Football League, and their financial turmoil, and will turn out for National League side Eastleigh next season. 19. Danny Whitehead (Signed: June 2013 – Departed: January 2015) – Another prospect who failed to fulfil expectations, Whitehead arrived from Stockport United for an undisclosed fee. He made one appearance for West Ham – the 5-0 demolition defeat delivered by Nottingham Forest in the 2014 FA Cup – and was soon on his way. Can now be found at Wigan Athletic and has since transitioned to a midfield role. 1. Ilan (Signed: February 2010 – Departed: June 2010) – The Brazilian striker arrived at West Ham following a spell at French side Saint-Etienne and, considering some of the players on this list, he might be considered a moderate success. Ilan scored four goals in 11 outings for Gianfranco Zola’s Hammers including crucial strikes against Everton and Sunderland. Released at the end of that season and last played for Bastia whom he left in 2014. 23. Jaanai Gordon (Signed: January 2014 – still at club) – Gordon was brought in as one for the future from Peterborough United and is yet to make an appearance for the Hammers. Has been sent out for a number of loan spells, most recently with Newport County last season, but is still just 21 years old. 32 32. Ashley Fletcher (Signed: July 2016 – still at club) – Another hope for the future, who could yet prosper, Fletcher was brought in from Manchester United on a free transfer. Enjoyed a productive time on loan at Barnsley, during his spell with the Red Devils, but probably wasn’t expecting to be so involved with the West Ham first team this season. Scored one goal for the club, against Manchester United of course, and certainly has the build to be a menace for defenders in the future.last_img read more

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