January 23, 2021
  • 9:38 am Jamestown Public Schools Hosting Virtual College Tours This Week
  • 9:34 am President Trump, Joe Biden To Hold Competing Town Halls This Week
  • 9:33 am 63-Year-Old Man Dies Following Four-wheeler Crash In Cattaraugus County
  • 7:48 am Tony Nominee Kenny Leon on Broadway-Bound Holler If Ya Hear Me: ‘Hopefully, It Will Change the World’
  • 7:44 am Lessons of the Week! Kristin Chenoweth, Chris O’Dowd & More

first_img Dames at Sea About the PhotographerMatthew Murphy is a New York City-based photographer specializing in theater and dance. His work appears regularly in the Arts and Leisure section of The New York Times and additional credits include Bravo TV, New York Magazine, Vanity Fair, The Village Voice, Dance Magazine, The Financial Times and The New York Post. He is a former member of American Ballet Theatre. For more information visit MurphyMade.com.Additional CreditsArt direction by Mitch Dean; styling by James Brown III; hair and makeup by Alex Michaels; post production by Peter James ZielinskiVideo CreditsShot by Nick Shakra and Jim Cocoliato; edited by Nick Shakra; produced by Anthony Taylor; executive produced by Beth Stevens and Paul Wontorek Related Shows Cary Tedder & Eloise Kropp photographed by Matthew Murphy for Broadway.comDames at Sea’s headlining hoofers Eloise Kropp and Cary Tedder evoke the glamour of an earlier time in this revival that harkens back to the golden era of movie musicals. Think tap-dancing, sailors, a vain diva and an ingenue fresh off the bus from Utah, and you have a clear picture about this feel-good show.Cary TedderPhotographer Matthew Murphy looked to images from Dames’ time period for inspiration for these exclusive Broadway.com photos. “I knew I wanted the images to nod to some of George Hurrell’s famous shots of Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth, while also standing on their own,” Murphy said. “I began to envision the shoot as if we were creating promo images for a new 1940s movie starring a young dancing duo on the verge of superstardom. The dancers infused it with their own quirks, beauty and technique. It’s not hard to believe that these two would have taken Hollywood by storm.”Eloise KroppTake a look at highlights from the photo shoot below, then click through the gallery for the rest of these gorgeous photographs! center_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 3, 2016 View Commentslast_img read more

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first_img Misery Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 14, 2016 Related Shows View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home.center_img Star Files Bruce Willis will officially begin facing off against his number one fan Laurie Metcalf in Misery on November 15. Directed by Will Frears, the stage adaptation of Stephen King’s classic is written by William Goldman and playing at the Broadhurst Theatre.To celebrate the Great White Way premiere of the suspense thriller, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson penned this portrait of Willis as Paul Sheldon and Metcalf as Annie Wilkes.Write as if your life depends on it, Mr. Willis! Broadway.com wishes you and Ms. Metcalf a happy opening! Laurie Metcalflast_img read more

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first_img View Comments Attention Tveiter Tots! After Aaron Tveit has given us multiplying thrills as Danny Zuko in Fox’s forthcoming live telecast of Grease, he’s heading back to the stage. Our Broadway boyfriend will play at New York hotspot Irving Plaza on June 11.Tveit previously headlined a solo show in the Big Apple at 54 Below back in 2013. We can’t wait to see what he’s got in store for us this time!The star made his Broadway debut as Link Larkin in Hairspray in 2006 and later appeared in Wicked, Next to Normal and Catch Me If You Can. Tveit’s screen credits include Graceland, Big Sky and the Les Miz movie.As if you didn’t know already, Grease: Live will air on Fox on January 31. Until then you can get your Tveit fix here!last_img

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first_imgPhoto: Washington State U. With soil temperatures down now, it’s time to plant the bulbs (tulips, daffodils,hyacinth, etc) that will make beautiful flowers in the spring. On “The GeorgiaGardener” Oct. 28 and 30, host Walter Reeves shows how to give bulbs a well-preparedbed.Reeves shows exactly how to prepare the soil. Then he shows how to arrange the bulbs,plant and mulch them.In his final show of the 1999season, Reeves shows how to plant a fescue lawn, too, including a nifty trick to helpdetermine how much seed to use. Finally, he demonstrates the proper way to prune shrubsand trees.”The Georgia Gardener” is designed especially for Georgia gardeners. It airson GPTV at 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays and 10 a.m. on Saturdays. The show is produced by theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and PFC HoldingCompany.last_img read more

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first_img “It’s something we have to learn to use more,” Adams said. “The more we use it, the more valuable it’s going to be.” When Hoogenboom began setting up the network in 1991, he planned to have each station download its data daily into the data base in Griffin. Now, Hoogenboom places the number of stations at “40-plus.” A dozen are on private farms, nurseries or golf courses. “We’ve continued to expand all along,” he said. “I’m in the process of installing four more stations over the next month or two. We should have around 45 stations by midyear.” To help make the data easier to use, Hoogenboom added a number of applications to the Web site. These enable people to get, in seconds, data on weather history, degree days, chilling hours, water balance, heating and cooling days and crop models. As he began developing the network Web site in 1998, though, it became clear the daily download wouldn’t be enough. “We began to hear from people who wanted current weather conditions,” he said. From the Griffin, Ga., campus of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Hoogenboom spent much of the 1990s assembling the Automated Environmental Monitoring Network. From the outset, the network was focused on collecting reliable weather information for agricultural and environmental uses. It has become one of the best available in any U.S. state. Every second, each automated station in the network monitors air temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, solar radiation, wind speed, wind direction and soil temperature at 2-, 4- and 8-inch depths. Georgia farmers have known all along that weather profoundly affects our lives. With the winter’s icy surge in late January, the rest of us know now that accurate weather information isn’t just for farmers. “People are finding a growing range of needs for our data,” said Gerrit Hoogenboom, a University of Georgia associate professor of biological and agricultural engineering. “Besides agricultural sites, many utilities in the state are using it in their planning,” he said. “Construction firms are finding it useful, and a number of lawyers use the data in litigation cases. Schools are beginning to use it more in education, too.” A Web site provides the collected data, maps, applications that make the numbers easier to use, and ample links to other weatherinformation. The network began with monitoring stations (about $5,500 each) on the UGA experiment stations in Watkinsville, Griffin and Tifton. Soon stations were added at each of the seven branch stations in Attapulgus, Eatonton, Savannah, Blairsville, Calhoun, Midville and Plains. Weather Network Expanding Gerrit Hoogenboom tends to one of 40-plus automated weather stations in the UGA network. Photo: Sharon Omahen James Lee Adams, who has one of the stations on his farm near Camilla, Ga., said he constantly checks the soil temperatures as he prepares to plan cotton, peanuts and corn. “We use the data in a lot of ways,” he said. Air temperature and humidity data help in adjusting the climate in the farm’s poultry houses. Temperature reports help avoid aflatoxin in peanuts. Heat units help determine cotton’s maturity. Rainfall and evapotranspiration rates help in scheduling irrigation. Temperature and wind data help schedule pesticide spraying. Data and the Bottom Linecenter_img Adams Farm’s Many Uses Spraying chemicals at the most efficient time helps protect the environment. “But the bottom line,” Adams said, “is that being more efficient saves us money.” Utility companies use the heating or cooling degree-day calculators to help them plan for their customers’ heating and cooling needs. It helps with customer education, too. “The heating- and cooling-day figures help customers understand the variations in their bills,” said Jim Hunter, manager of marketing and member services for Colquitt Electric Membership Corporation in south Georgia.. Web Wealth of Weather Data Now, the eight stations in metro Atlanta, which have toll-free phone connections, update their data every 15 minutes. A number of grants cover the $10,000 long-distance bill to enable 14 other stations to download every hour. Each site “owner” in the network pays the monthly local phone charges, which spreads out another $13,000 in annual phone costs. Timely Weather Data As the network expands, the range of its users — and the value each assigns to it — is growing, too. Automated Environmental Monitoring UGA File Photo Each of the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network’s 40-plus stations, like this one, costs about $5,500.last_img read more

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first_imgWith an annual production approaching $2.8 billion, Georgiapoultry farmers need the wealth of information offered in theDeep South Poultry Conference May 23 in Tifton, Ga.The program will open with 8:10 a.m. registration at the RuralDevelopment Center off I-75 (exit 64).In the opening sessions, university and industry experts willaddress topics from auditing animal welfare to an update ondisease outbreaks.Breeder, Broiler SessionsAfter the morning break, the program will be divided intoseparate sessions for breeders and broilers. The sessions willend at 4 p.m.The deadline to register is May 16. A $35 fee ($40 after May 16)covers lunch, refreshments and the conference proceedings.To learn moreabout the program, call BillDozier at (229) 386-3442. For a registrationform, call the UGA TiftonCampus Conference Center at (229) 386-3416. Or registeron-line.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaWhen agricultural lobbyist Bob Redding wants to know how a pending Washington policy decision will impact farmers in Georgia or other places, he often turns to a tool developed by University of Georgia economists.The U.S. Representative Peanut Farms are virtual farms created using real data collected from 100 real, live farmers. Economic information can be fed into them to see how different scenarios affect the farms’ bottom lines.“They are very helpful, and we use them in various ways,” said Redding in a phone interview from his Washington office. “It’s a scientific approach that takes the guess work out of it. We can take that to congressmen to say these are the facts.”Redding is a lobbyist for several commodity groups and farm organizations, including the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.“I initiated the representative farm project because peanut farmers needed to have the level of information other commodities, which have similar representative farms, have” said Stanley Fletcher, director of the National Center for Peanut Competitiveness and an economist with the CAES.There are 19 different virtual farms. Each is a composite made by five or six family farms of similar size, location and production practices from Virginia to New Mexico. The one thing they all have in common is peanut production. Since Georgia produces almost half of the total U.S. peanut supply, it has the most farms. But the farms include cotton, corn, soybean, cattle, fruits or vegetables, too.Lobbyists aren’t the only ones who want to know what the virtual farms say. Congressional staff and other farm leaders call, too, with different scenarios to run.”Any time an issue comes up from a regulatory- or policy-type avenue, we are able to take these farms and see how they’d be affected,” Fletcher said.The farms are built to be flexible and adjustable to many situations, not just policymaking. What if chemical prices go up or commodity prices go down? Will one crop make more money than another? Will a new farming technique be economically better than an old one? What if Georgia has a drought? It all can be plugged into the farms to see what happens. When current, real-world numbers are plugged into the farms, the reflection isn’t pretty, Fletcher said.“The representative farms show Southern agriculture is in real trouble. Since ’05 we’ve taken a nosedive,” Fletcher said. “We have had increases in crop prices, but the increase hasn’t covered the total input costs enough to be economically viable. I’m not sure how a lot of these guys are still in business. In the representative farms, many are not.” The representative peanut farm project was developed using similar, nationally recognized models developed for other crops by the Agricultural and Food Policy Center at Texas A&M.It’s funded by the farmer-supported Georgia Peanut Commission and the National Peanut Board through the Southeastern Peanut Research Initiative. “Say that water becomes restricted or the cost of energy goes up like it has dramatically in the past few years,” said Allen McCorvey, a CAES economic research coordinator. “We run this through the farms, analyze it and see how it will impact the viability and the cash flow of the operations.”last_img read more

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first_imgRoses are typically viewed as one of the most beautiful flowers, but in rare cases a tiny pest can cause gnarly looking, new growth on rose bushes. Rose leaf-curl mites feed on roses and cause rose rosette virus, also known as RRV. The extremely small eriophyid mite feeds on plant sap from the tender stems and leaf petioles. The pest alone causes little damage while feeding, but if it is a carrier of RRV, symptoms begin to appear in the rose typically within one to three months. There is no cure for RRV and it is not always preventable, since there are no vaccines for plant viruses.Causes thick, succulent stemsInfected roses exhibit reddened terminal growth on infected branches, and the stems become thicker and more succulent than those on unaffected parts of the plant. These stems exhibit an abnormally high number of pliable thorns, which may be either green or red. Infected rose bushes produce less flowers and the petals may be distorted and fewer in number. Rose leaves that develop on infected branches are smaller than normal and may be deformed similarly to herbicide injury by 2,4-D. Lateral branches may grow excessively from main stems and create a witch’s broom symptom, much like injury from herbicide glyphosate (Roundup and other brands). Treat nearby rose bushesTo reduce the spread of leaf-curl mites from the site of an infected rose, nearby roses can be treated with an insecticide spray containing bifenthrin or a horticultural summer oil every two weeks between April and September. This may help prevent additional plants from becoming virus infected by any sap-vectoring mites. Symptoms of the virus generally become evident in the late spring to early summer and progress during the growing season. By late summer or fall, the plant will have a noticeable amount of abnormal, gnarly growth. Once the rose becomes infected, RRV moves throughout the plant and the entire bush becomes infected. By the time symptoms are evident in a rose, the virus may have spread to adjacent roses by the movement of the mites. Only affects rosesInfected plants typically die within a couple of years. The good news is RRV only affects roses, so other plants in your garden won’t get this disease unless they are closely related to the rose plant. Since there are no treatments for plant viruses, infected roses should be immediately removed, then burned or bagged for disposal. Also remove any roots that might re-sprout later. Do not leave an uprooted, infected plant in the garden, as the mites may leave this bush for other nearby roses. When planting new roses, space plants far enough apart so that they do not touch in order to minimize potential spread of these types of diseases. Because RRV is systemic within the infected rose plants, grafting infected stems onto other rose plants will transmit the virus. Nursery growers may infect roses this way through poor propagation practices. Pruning shears and other tools used on diseased roses should be disinfected with rubbing alcohol or a 10 percent diluted bleach solution before being used on healthy plants. Sap left on the pruners can contaminate other roses. For more information on growing roses, refer to the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension publications at www.caes.uga.edu/publications/.last_img read more

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first_imgFarmers looking to take advantage of the growing market for organic and non-GMO grains should plan to be in Upson County on July 31. UGA Extension in Spalding and Upson counties are sponsoring a sustainable small grain production field day from 10 a.m. until noon July 31 at the Wes Smith Farm, located west of The Rock on Race Track Road off of Ga. Highway 36. This field day is for sustainable or organic vegetable farmers who want to break into grain production and for traditional grain producers who want to take advantage of the market for non-GMO and organic markets, said Spalding County Extension Coordinator Wade Hutcheson. Hutcheson and Upson County Extension Coordinator Wes Smith will provide demonstrations on corn and soybeans grown under various tillage strategies; corn grown with chicken litter as the nutrient source and behind crimson clover as a nutrient source; estimating grain yields under sustainable production systems; and drilled soybeans behind small grain and crimson clover. There will also be an update on the proposed opening of an organic and non-GMO grain buying point in Forsyth, Ga. Coyote Creek, makers of organic animal feeds, has floated the prospect of opening the buying point there, Hutcheson said. “They likely will purchase corn, soybeans, wheat, oats and barley that are certified organic and GMO free,” he said. “This will be a great opportunity to see small grain production geared towards that market.” The field day is free, but farmers need to RSVP by July 28 to reserve a space and to ensure there is enough interest in the event. For more information email hutch@uga.edu or call 770.467.4225.last_img read more

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first_imgThe University of Georgia’s newest pecan variety will be released next spring and has shown good resistance against scab disease so far, according to Patrick Conner, a horticultural scientist at the UGA Tifton Campus.“We always say ‘so far’ because the scab pathogen does tend to adapt to trees over time,” Conner said. “Currently, this variety has no scab in our sprayed orchards, and only trace scab in our unsprayed orchards.”The Avalon variety has been patented by UGA, and four nurseries in Georgia are currently licensed to sell Avalon trees. Conner said the variety is unique because of its size and quality combined with high scab resistance.“That combination of big size, high quality and high levels of scab resistance is fairly unique,” Conner said. “Most highly resistant cultivars are either small in size, or they don’t have the commercial quality we like to see.”The Avalon variety’s biggest benefit is the decreasing number of times growers will have to spray fungicides, which will save a lot of money. Conner said that growers of the Desirable variety, Georgia’s most widely grown variety, were spraying 12 to 20 times a season, depending on rainfall.“This variety would need only a couple of sprays per year,” Conner said. “It’s more profitable because you’re avoiding the expense of the fungicides.”Conner said the new variety will also help growers fight scab during a very wet growing season.“Even with full spray coverage on Desirable trees, in a really wet year, you could still get severe damage and crop loss,” Conner said. “Avalon gives you some assurance during a really wet year.”Avalon was developed by crossbreeding two scab-resistant varieties. Separately, the varieties lacked sufficient quality, but together they produced seedlings that performed much better. More than 100 seeds were planted from the cross.“We evaluated the trees in the field without spray,” Conner said. “The Avalon tree was the only one that had the combination of good nut quality and high levels of resistance. It’s really just a matter of making a cross, and then looking at enough seedlings to find all the traits you’re looking for.”Conner said that the Avalon variety should be adaptable to any part of the state. It will be most important to south Georgia growers because of the higher scab pressure in the southern part of the state that makes growing traditional varieties, like Desirable, very difficult.Pecans are a valuable Georgia commodity, worth more than $361 million in farm gate value in 2015, according to the Georgia Farm Gate Value Report, published by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development.“I’m hopeful that Avalon will allow growers to plant something besides Desirable that would need far fewer spray applications,” Conner said.last_img read more

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