April 3, 2020
  • 11:00 am Calabar retain South Conference basketball title
  • 2:01 pm Sports Briefs
  • 1:59 pm Clarendon win, but champs drop out title race
  • 1:57 pm Sports Briefs
  • 1:54 pm Calabar excite at inaugural Wint/McKenley Classic

first_imgDeciding not to sit back, Narain-Mohan began using her skills as an educator to teach her community how to engage and seek answers for their social problems. The centres also offered beauty and detoxing services for the first time in these areas, all contributing to a “feel good about yourself” lifestyle in previously disadvantaged communities. Education: Roslyn Narain-Mohan Janet Buckland – known simply as “Mama J” to the communities she works with in the Eastern Cape – has been responsible for the initiation and creation of a significant number of successful arts and culture projects in the province. With a PhD degree in visual performance training, Calder is a pioneer in this field and has created an exciting new sport science that is sought after by international coaches looking to bring an extra dimension to their game. Seven category winners and an overall winner were announced at the gala event, which will be broadcast by SABC 2 at 8pm on National Women’s Day, 9 August 2008. Other researchers have expanded on her work, and some of her micro-economic studies have been used in macro-economic modelling. The new science is based on the thinking that nothing happens in sport until the eye tells the body what to do. Calder first developed the technique she calls “Eyethink” in order to improve her own hockey game. Since its inception almost six years ago, Ubom! has reached audiences totalling more than 178 000. It also has provided 36 full-time contracts for actors to work in the Eastern Cape. Buckland raises the funds to sustain it herself. South Africa’s premier accolade for achievement by women has gone to Janet Buckland, who was named Shoprite Checkers/ SABC2 Woman of the Year 2008 at a dazzling event in celebration of the women of South Africa in Cape Town on 31 July. Ten years ago, Dr Veni Naidu gave up a high-powered and lucrative career in the corporate world in order to make a meaningful contribution to South Africa’s development. Consulting to the pediatric department of the Johannesburg Hospital, Jacklin acts as an “ombudsman” for such children, who do not fit into mainline education and struggle to fulfil their potential as they tend to be misdiagnosed and mistreated. She has created 41 jobs for women in these communities, developed some managerial positions to run the centres, and outsourced services such as accounting, laundry and security to local businesses. She represented South Africa in hockey between 1982 and 1996, gaining 50 international field hockey caps and 15 indoor caps. In 1995 she was selected to a team comprising the top 11 players in a pre-Olympic qualifying tournament. Professor Claire Penn was awarded South Africa’s Order of Mapungubwe in 2007 for her contribution to the field of speech and language pathology – especially in linguistics, sign language, child language and aphasia – and for groundbreaking research into the complexities of human communication. Business: Thabang Molefi Molefi’s next aim is to branch out into franchising in order to create more business and job opportunities. Besides the seven other centres she established in Gauteng, Kwazulu-Natal and the Free State, Molefi set up a mobile unit to visit communities in remote rural areas in the rest of the country. Roslyn Narain-Mohan, a teacher at the New West Secondary School in Durban, has become the “Mother Theresa” of her community, launching campaign after campaign to tackle virtually every form of social injustice affecting them. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Professor Sherylle Calder is a visual performance skills coach and world authority on the subject who has received back-to-back World Cup winners’ medals after training both the triumphant Springboks in 2007 and the English World Cup winners in 2003.center_img The winners in the seven categories – business, education, health, science and technology, social welfare, sport, and arts, culture and communications – each received R10 000 in prize money, while Buckland took home R30 000 as the overall winner. Health: Lorna Barbara Jacklin Professor Lorna Barbara Jacklin, principal consultant paediatrician at Wits University’s faculty of health sciences, has dedicated her life to improving the lives of children with mental health problems caused by physical disabilities or abuse. She combined her understanding of the value of the arts, particularly theatre, in the lives of all South Africans with her skills as a performer, director, fundraiser and administrator to direct these projects over a number of years. Today, the Roots Healthcare Centre business has branches in three South African provinces and a neighbouring country and boasts a multi-million rand turnover. Science and technology: Claire Penn Narain-Mohan’s community is a microcosm of a broader community affected by HIV/Aids, crime, racial conflict, poverty, age and individual suffering. Penn sees communication – a capacity which is complex, vulnerable and both a science and an art – as being at the heart of the human endeavour. For her, it can forge and sustain relationships but can equally be the main reason for breakdowns in understanding between individuals and communities. Social welfare: Veni Naidu Thabang Molefi is a qualified ethno-medical practitioner and beauty therapist who, with the little savings she had at the time, opened the first health spa in Soweto six years ago. The most notably project is Ubom! the Eastern Cape Drama Company, which was the first full-time professional drama company in the province. It brings theatre presentations and drama workshops to thousands of people in schools and communities all over the Eastern Cape. Sport: Sherylle Calder 8 August 2008 Untreated, mental health problems rob such children of a fair chance in life, translating into developmental and social problems as they grow into anti-social adults incapable of functioning independently. In her daily teaching and actions she encourages her pupils to seek solutions – which, for her, mean not just reaching out, but also identifying and understanding people’s real needs and the kind of support that would help people to help themselves in the long term. Arts, culture & communications (and overall winner) Naidu has received a doctorate for her groundbreaking research into the impact of HIV/Aids on businesses, families and communities. While most studies at the time focused on the medical aspects of HIV/Aids, Naidu investigated the economic and social impacts of the pandemic, completing the first study in South Africa on the impact HIV/Aids on income-earning urban households. Molefi’s pioneering centres introduced affordable health care to black communities through the use of the different but effective technique of iridology for diagnosis and herbs as prescribed medicines.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Jakob Wilson from JCW Farms in Madison County took time to visit with The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins about this year’s early harvest, what caught his eye at Farm Science Review and how he is a Top 4 Finalist in the American Star Ag Placement category at The National FFA Convention later this year.last_img

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first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts anthony myers Tags:#documents#Dropbox#file sync#files#Google#Microsoft#online#privacy#referer headers#security#storage#vulnerabilities Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…center_img Those files you’re storing on cloud services like Dropbox or Box may not be as secure as you think.Both services, like other cloud-storage providers, allow users to share links to their stored documents. But sending those links out, even to trusted individuals, can also inadvertently give third parties access to your files as well, according to findings publicized by the file-sharing company Intralinks—which, by the way, is a competitor to both Box and Dropbox.Dropbox says it’s working to fix the problem by disabling any previously shared links that might be vulnerable to leakage. Box released an email statement saying that it has found no evidence that anyone has abused such “open links” and touting the various privacy settings it offers its users to “help manage access to their content.”Intralinks chief security officer John Landy wrote that his company inadvertently stumbled upon the vulnerability in the course of running a Google Adwords campaign that mentioned its competitors. That campaign turned up shared-file URLs that led straight to sensitive files that ordinary users had stored on Box and Dropbox—including bank records, mortgage applications and tax returns. Security blogger Graham Cluley, who also blogs for Intralink, provides some examples.How That Leakage HappensHow, exactly, that happened involves some conjecture. Landy wrote that some Dropbox and Box users apparently created shared links to their files, which they or their recipients then mistakenly entered into a browser search box instead of the URL bar. Doing so and then clicking on an ad—which may seem a fairly unlikely occurrence, at least until you multiply it by the number of people sharing files across the Internet—would then send the file’s URL to the ad network.One Intralinks executive quoted by Cluley estimated that in one of the company’s Adwords campaign, five percent of all hits (presumably meaning ad clicks) yielded URLs to private files, half of which required no password to access. That “small” campaign turned up more than 300 documents.There’s also a second way links to private files could leak out to the world. If a shared Dropbox or Box document itself contains links to other sites, clicking on one will pass along the document’s URL to the next website as part of what’s known as a referer header, where administrators of the second site could see it.It’s not clear if similar vulnerabilities exist for other cloud-storage services such as Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive.No Password RequiredThe problem for Box and Dropbox is that they don’t make their shared links more secure, Landy wrote. Recipients of shared links should have to log into the service to authenticate themselves by default, he suggested.Dropbox engineering vice president Aditya Agarwal said in a blog post that his company hasn’t detected any malicious attacks involving shared file URLs. Dropbox decided to disable any affected document links anyway. The vulnerability has been patched for any shared links going forward, so only previously shared items are affected.Dropbox customers can recreate their shared links, and the company will restore old links as it confirms that particular documents aren’t vulnerable. Agarwal also noted that Dropbox for Business users can require password access to shared files; ordinary users of Dropbox’s free service don’t have that option.The Dropbox post only addresses one of the two vulnerabilities outlined by Intralinks—the leak-via-referer-header method. In an update, Agarwal wrote that Dropbox is aware that file URLs could leak via search engines that pass them to ad partners, but said that issue is “well known” and that the company “doesn’t consider it a vulnerability.”Like Dropbox for Business customers, users of Box can also require passwords for file access, although in neither case is that security feature turned on by default. “Box also displays a message to help users understand the permissions for their content,” a Box spokesperson said via email.Image of Dropbox CEO Drew Houston by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloudlast_img read more

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first_img Jamaica is set to benefit from an initial US$7.52 million in grant funding under the ninth cycle of the Caribbean Development Bank’s (CDB) Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF 9).The money will go towards the areas of education, transportation, enterprise development, and water and sanitation, through projects implemented by the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF).The allocation is part of a provision of US$40.8 million being made available to nine Caribbean borrowing member countries of the CDB, under the BNTF.The BNTF is the flagship poverty-reduction programme of the CDB, aimed at contributing to improvement in the living conditions of poor and vulnerable communities in participating countries.Speaking at the official launch of the project today (October 17) at the Courtyard Marriott hotel in New Kingston, Minister of Finance and the Public Service, Hon. Audley Shaw, said the initiative will assist in empowering the lives of beneficiaries.“We are quick to get these funds in the hands of the JSIF, because we know that when it comes to the JSIF, we get every bang for the buck; we get good performance. They have projects done on time (and) within budget, and we are really proud of the JSIF as one of the outstanding public-sector agencies in Jamaica,” he said.The Minister lauded the CDB for implementing the programme, adding that poverty reduction is a crucial component for economic growth and development.He said the BNTF will assist in improving the lives of the country’s most vulnerable, particularly in the areas of education and human development.Meanwhile, Director, Projects Department, CDB, Daniel Best, informed that Jamaica is also eligible to benefit from an unallocated incentive amount of US$5.2 million, to be distributed at midterm based on project performance.“These funds are to be carefully targeted through an evidence-based country policy framework or action plan, which responds to poverty, particularly in rural areas,” he said.Mr. Best noted that through the BNTF, the CDB supports governments in their poverty-reduction efforts by promoting socio-economic activities, environmental protection and sustainable development.“Over the years, BNTF has formed specific partnerships, mainly with public works, water sector, and national training institutions. Under BNTF 9, however, we are committed to leveraging additional resources beyond our traditional funding sources to accelerate progress on poverty reduction,” he said.Managing Director, JSIF, Omar Sweeney, said BNTF 9 will continue to build on programmes that support education, transportation, road access, drainage and water supply.“We will also introduce a component for enterprise development, and that will focus on agriculture and tourism, and developing new technology for persons in the rural areas to really have a sustainable livelihood,” he said.The ninth cycle of the BNTF will continue to finance sub-project interventions in core priority sectors of water and sanitation, basic community access and drainage, and education and human resource development, including livelihoods.Encouraging greater private-sector partnership has been built into the programme design to leverage additional resources for reducing poverty.The core purpose of the project will be to facilitate the development of rural communities through increased access to basic services, thereby advancing Jamaica’s thrust towards full rural development. The project is to be completed by December 31, 2020.The BNTF is one of the longest-running regional poverty-reduction programmes in the Caribbean, and stands out in the global development arena for its community-driven approach tailored for the Caribbean context. Jamaica is set to benefit from an initial US$7.52 million in grant funding under the ninth cycle of the Caribbean Development Bank’s (CDB) Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF 9). Meanwhile, Director, Projects Department, CDB, Daniel Best, informed that Jamaica is also eligible to benefit from an unallocated incentive amount of US$5.2 million, to be distributed at midterm based on project performance. The core purpose of the project will be to facilitate the development of rural communities through increased access to basic services, thereby advancing Jamaica’s thrust towards full rural development. The project is to be completed by December 31, 2020. Story Highlightslast_img read more

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first_imgNew Delhi: State-owned BHEL on Friday reported a consolidated net loss of Rs 218.93 crore for June quarter 2019-20 mainly due to lower revenues. The company had reported a profit of Rs 39.98 crore in the year-ago period, a BSE filing said. Total income of the company came down to Rs 4,673.38 crore in June quarter from Rs 6,116.21 crore a year earlier. Revenue from power segment declined to Rs 3,491.54 crore in the quarter under review from Rs 4,636.18 crore in the year-ago period. Industry segment revenue dipped to Rs 919.55 crore from Rs 1,160.52 crore a year ago.last_img

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