September 24, 2020
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first_imgThe Office of Student Affairs and the consultant team for the USC Bicycle Master Plan presented a review of the planning process Thursday and outlined proposed solutions to bicycle congestion on campus, which includes the designation of specific bike lanes on campus.Alison Kendall, a principle architect at Kendall Planning + Design, a firm hired in October to work with Student Affairs and the Dept. of Public Safety to help solve the ongoing issues related to bikes, spoke at the event held at Tommy’s Place.Proposed bike plans would create designated bike lanes along Trousdale Parkway, Downey Way and McClintock Avenue. | Photo courtesy of USC“Basically, what we began is a systematic approach to looking at bikes on campus,” Kendall said. “Our general concept is to have certain roadways on campus that are marked by direction where it is safe [to ride a bike].”Twenty-five percent of undergraduates have had a collision with a bicycle within the last year, Kendall said.To increase safety on campus, the consultants suggest that separate bike lanes be created on all major roadways on campus, including McClintock Avenue, Trousdale Parkway, Downey Way and 34th Street.“While not wanting to be overly restrictive, there is obviously a need to regulate,” Kendall said. “We need to develop a progressive enforcement approach.”Consultants also presented plans to add more secure bike racks around campus, bike repair and services centers and a bike sharing and rental program as an alternative to owning a bike.Kendall Planning + Design spoke to students and faculty , including 20 student and staff organizations, about the bike issues, and reviewed accident data involving bicycles on campus. The firm also looked at other universities, such as Stanford University that have implemented bike safety programs on their campuses.About 200 people provided their input at the first bike summit on Jan. 18, and 2,000 people responded to an online survey about the bikes.Consultants on the project also determined that most cyclists at USC are inexperienced.“Many undergrad cyclists had never really biked before,” Kendall said. “As a result, they have a very limited understanding of how to bike in an urban setting.”To remedy this issue, Kendall Planning + Design has suggested a program to educate cyclists at USC, which would potentially include classes on safety, bike tours around campus, videos offering biking tips and outreach from groups such as peer health educators, residential advisers and DPS.Tom Studdert, director of orientation programs, said none of these plans have been finalized. USC administrators are set to discuss the plan at their meeting in early May.“From there, an implementation plan will be developed. It’s not just an overnight process,” Studdert said.Deike Peters, an adjunct assistant professor of urban planning, and graduate students from a Bike Planning Studio course in the Sol Price School of Public Policy also presented their specific research material and suggestions at the event. The students worked closely with Kendall Planning + Design on the project.last_img read more

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first_img Published on February 17, 2016 at 9:50 pm Contact Chris: cfthomse@syr.edu A five-game winning streak. Back-to-back sweeps of conference opponents. Winner of eight of its last 11 games.The Orange is ending its regular season by playing its best hockey of the year. But even with only two games left, SU is still operating at full speed in hopes of earning the top seed in the conference.“We need to win both games, especially going into the playoffs,” defender Nicole Renault said. “We have that bye week, so we can leave on a good foot. We’re not satisfied with where we are.”Syracuse (16-13-3, 12-4-2 College Hockey America) is still second in the CHA standings to Mercyhurst, who also swept its opponent, RIT, last weekend. That’s forced head coach Paul Flanagan and his team to keep up its consistent play this weekend against Lindenwood (8-20-4, 5-9-4). In order to clinch first outright, Syracuse must win both games while Mercyhurst must lose or tie its two games.“There’s still a lot on the line on Friday,” Flanagan said. “We have to do our job, and potentially Penn State (who faces Mercyhurst this weekend) will help us out, which would set the stage for Saturday, where we have to win again.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFive-game winning streaks are rare for SU. The Orange’s last one came in early 2013, highlighted by a win over No. 3 Boston College. Syracuse has never had one this late in the season, which Flanagan considers a huge advantage compared to his past teams.Even if Flanagan wasn’t forced to win this weekend in order to earn the No. 1 rank in the conference, he would still try to keep the Orange’s confidence going.“We’re trying to maintain the status quo,” Flanagan said. “We’re keeping things very similar. After five months, you’re in a pretty good routine.”He couldn’t be happier that his schedule ends with four home games, which allows all of his players to maintain their regular routines. He cancelled practice on Monday for the third consecutive week. He’s continued to back off with his criticisms. And he’s cut down on his overall time spent with the team, which he says isn’t even close to the maximum 20 hours granted by the NCAA.All are signs of trust in his team’s experience and morale. The Orange’s six-goal period against Robert Morris last Saturday is all the evidence he needs, which he called the strongest 20 minutes his team has played this season.“We’re hitting full stride here,” Flanagan said. “The girls feel pretty good about themselves, and so much in sport is about having confidence. I think as a group, the girls have so much confidence.”But Syracuse isn’t the only team in the conference playing at its best right now. Rival Mercyhurst has won seven of its last nine matchups, including its last four.The Lakers’ last loss was a 2-1 loss to Syracuse on Jan. 30, thanks to Jessica Sibley’s game-winner with a minute and a half left in overtime.The Orange’s last defeat was a 4-1 loss to Mercyhurst on Jan. 29.Since then, Flanagan thinks his team has learned to prevent mistakes late in games that have led to losses earlier this season.“We’ve been able to clamp down defensively when we’ve needed to,” Flanagan said. “Whether it’s making a good play, getting the puck out of the zone or clearing rebounds, or (goalie Jenn Gilligan) making a good save.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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first_imgMORE: Everything you need to know about the NBA’s bubbleKeeping the campus safe for all involved will be a major challenge. It’s fair to be skeptical of any league’s appraoch, but the NBA has taken several measures to ensure departing players will not jeopardize the health of others and derail the season. How often will NBA players be tested for the coronavirus?As part of its 100-plus page health and safety document (via ESPN’s Tim Bontemps and Brian Windhorst), the NBA says players will be tested for COVID-19 “regularly,” but it did not specify exactly how many times players will be tested on a daily or weekly basis. Players could be tested daily under certain circumstances.What happens if an NBA player tests positive for coronavirus?If a player tests positive for COVID-19, that player will be isolated, then retested to verify the initial test didn’t produce a false positive. If additional testing confirms the original result, that player will be out for at least 14 days. The player would also have to pass a cardiac screening in order to be cleared to play.In that scenario, anybody who had been in close contact with the player for at least 15 minutes or had direct contact with the player will be tested.When is an NBA player allowed to leave the bubble?A player can leave at any time, but if the absence is unexcused, that player would be forced to quarantine for 10-14 days upon return.Some examples of excused absences:Receiving team-directed medical care off campusBirth of a childIllness/death in familyPreviously scheduled family weddingWhat happens when an NBA player re-enters the bubble?If a player is returning from an unexcused absence, that player will be subject to enhanced testing (deep nasal swab) and the 10- to 14-day quarantine. That player would also face a reduction in salary for any games missed during the absence and/or quarantine.An excused absence would force a player to quarantine for only four days as long as that player tests negative for COVID-19 each day the player is outside of the Orlando campus.From the NBA’s health and safety document (via ESPN’s Bobby Marks):Enhanced testing: Testing will include nasopharyngeal swab testing.Quarantine: Tens days of quarantine in a hotel room or other campus property (which may be extended up to a total of 14 days, as directed by a consulting infectious disease physician designated by the NBA for the case). If, however, a player leaves the campus for extenuating circumstances with prior league approval (e.g., need to receive team-directed medical care off-campus, birth of a child, documented severe illness or death in family, or previously scheduled family wedding), and (a) during each day off-campus undergoes a daily PCR test and returns negative test results each time, or (b) if the players leaves for an extended absence but undergoes a daily PCR test and returns a negative test result for at least the seven days preceding his return to campus, then the player’s quarantine on the campus will be four days (subject to extension by a consulting infectious disease physician designated by the NBA for the case). The player must undergo his final PCR test prior to exiting quarantine via a nasopharyngeal swab.Could a coronavirus outbreak end the NBA season?NBA commissioner Adam Silver has admitted the league’s season could be suspended or canceled if there is a large COVID-19 outbreak. While there is plenty of excitement ahead of the NBA’s season restart, there is also plenty of uneasiness amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.The league’s “bubble” idea sounds great in theory, but the presence of the coronavirus can’t be completely eliminated as teams attempt to finish the 2019-20 season at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fla. Players have already left and re-entered the “bubble,” including Clippers guard Lou Williams, who was forced into quarantine after grabbing dinner from an Atlanta strip club during an excused absence. “Never ‘full steam ahead, no matter what,'” Silver said in June. “One thing we are learning about this virus is [that] much [is] unpredictable, and we and our players, together with their union, look at the data on a daily basis. If there were something to change that was outside of the scope of what we are playing for, [then] certainly we would revisit our plans.”It is unclear how many positive tests it would take in order for the NBA to consider a suspension of play.”The occurrence of a small or otherwise expected number of COVID-19 cases will not require a decision to suspend or cancel the resumption” of the season, the health and safety document states.last_img read more

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