November 30, 2020
  • 5:30 am Moment iPhone 12 Case with MagSafe features a rugged, dual-compound construction » Gadget Flow
  • 5:28 am Comcast to narrow focus of Comcast Ventures, leading to partner defections
  • 5:25 am NFL to make history with first all-black officiating team as Los Angeles Rams face Buccaneers in Tampa | NFL News
  • 8:00 am H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: 41 more US deaths, Tamiflu resistance, UK vaccine priorities, state deputizes more healthcare workers
  • 7:05 am Benchmarking research of campsites in Croatia

first_imgWith a rugged, dual-compound construction, the Moment iPhone 12 Case with MagSafe will protect your phone. This includes when storing your device in your pocket or for accidental drops. In fact, you can drop the iPhone12 Case from 6 feet, and it’ll limit damage and scratches to your phone thanks to its extra-strength design. Furthermore, the case curves around the edges of your phone. This provides the right balance between protection and minimalism. Also, its thin rubberized body makes it pocket friendly. It’s a convenient way to protect your iPhone 12, and it even works with Qi wireless charging without having to remove the cover. Plus, the built-in magnet tray is compatible with MagSafe. Overall, the Moment iPhone 12 Case with MagSafe is compatible with a range of iPhone 12s, including the mini, Pro, and Pro Max. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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first_imgRelatedPosts Super Eagles soar on FIFA ranking COVID-19: FIFA count cost to football Russia: Between poison and vaccine, by Gabriel Agbo Former Fifa executives took bribes in return for voting for Russia and Qatar to host the World Cup, according to US prosecutors. In what could be a highly significant twist in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s long-running investigation into allegations of football corruption, a new indictment was revealed in the US District Court on Monday. The documents claim several former Fifa executive committee members “were offered or received bribes in connection with their votes”. The Department of Justice made allegations against Nicolas Leoz, the former president of South American governing body Conmebol, and ex-Brazil federation supremo Ricardo Teixeira. Both are accused of taking money “in exchange for their votes in favour of Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup”. Disgraced former Fifa vice-president Jack Warner of Trinidad and Tobago was also allegedly paid £4 million through a host of offshore shell companies to back Russia’s 2018 bid. Russia beat England to win the right to host the most recent World Cup in 2018. Warner was president of the North and Central American and Caribbean confederation Concacaf. Another former Fifa ExCo member – Guatemala football chief Rafael Salguero – was allegedly promised a bribe to vote for Russia. Leoz died last year under house arrest in his native Paraguay, having fought extradition to the US. Teixeira has been banned from the game for life by Fifa for taking bribes for marketing and media rights for football competitions between 2006 and 2012. Teixeira and Warner, who is also banned for life, have avoided extradition to the US. Salguero was banned last year, having admitted corruption. Former executives at US television giant 21st Century Fox have also been charged in the indictment with making payments to South American football officials to secure broadcast rights. “The profiteering and bribery in international soccer have been deep-seated and commonly known practices for decades,” said FBI assistant director-in-charge William Sweeney. “The FBI… are investigating the illicit handshakes and backroom deals hidden in the infrastructure of soccer events, venues and marketing contracts. “The first public charges date back to 2015. This should illustrate to everyone still hoping to score millions corruptly, we’re going to find you.” Almost 10 years have now passed since Fifa controversially voted for Russia and Qatar to host the sport’s showpiece event. But it was only in 2015, following a dramatic dawn raid at a Zurich hotel close to the governing body’s headquarters, that the US Department of Justice announced it was investigating football and TV executives enriching themselves through the game. The scandal sparked the worst crisis in Fifa’s history, with its disgraced president Sepp Blatter eventually standing aside. A total of 42 people have been indicted, with 26 pleading guilty.Tags: briberyCorruptionfbiFederal Bureau of InvestigationFIFAQatarRussiaWorld Cup Hostslast_img read more

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