March 30, 2020
  • 11:00 am Calabar retain South Conference basketball title
  • 2:01 pm Sports Briefs
  • 1:59 pm Clarendon win, but champs drop out title race
  • 1:57 pm Sports Briefs
  • 1:54 pm Calabar excite at inaugural Wint/McKenley Classic

first_imgI found the unveiling of architect Frank Gehry’s designs for the Grand Avenue development exciting, bold and encouraging. The core of our city would have a true center that helps define our sprawling metropolis. Yet there was a gaping hole in the plan: There are no green building standards. The lack of any green building and broader commitment to environmental sustainability in the plan is a missed opportunity. The city of Los Angeles was one of the first cities in the nation to pass a municipal green building policy, requiring all new construction to meet the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified national voluntary standard that defines high performance green buildings, and strives for a LEED Silver rating with 10 percent of energy needs met on site through solar and other clean distributed generation technologies. The Los Angeles Community College District, for example, embraced LEED Silver for many of its 50 new buildings on nine campuses, a total of $3 billion in new construction. The Los Angeles Unified School District has embraced another green standard for schools, ensuring the $14 billion in new school construction will result in classrooms with healthier indoor air quality and schools with lower energy bills for decades to come. To fill this hole in the Grand Avenue design, the county of Los Angeles should pass a green building policy requiring that all buildings on county land and/or built with county funds meet LEED standards. And the Grand Avenue Committee should add environmental sustainability to its core criteria in shaping the final design of the buildings. Otherwise, this is not just a lost opportunity; it’s an opportunity cost that puts a great burden on future residents, occupants and tenants. Matt Petersen is president and CEO of Global Green USA, the American affiliate of Green Cross International, and serves on the city of Santa Monica Environmental Task Force.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsThe Grand Avenue development should do the same. Why green building? Green buildings increase productivity, performance and profits. The indoor climate is healthier. For schools, studies prove that students score higher on tests and attendance goes up when they’re in healthier classrooms. Green buildings address climate change. More than 40 percent of the world’s energy and resources go into the design, construction and maintenance of buildings. About one-third of the greenhouse gas emissions come from the electricity used in buildings. In a state where we recently experienced an electricity crisis, why doesn’t the design help meet much of the energy needs on site, at least those that can help reduce peak demand and meet emergency power needs? Why not accentuate the opportunities for harvesting the power of the sun, a free feedstock for energy, for all the buildings on site? Why no indication in the plan for capturing rainwater and storm runoff on site? Why no attempt in the design to capture and use the wind blowing between or past them to create energy? What if the buildings and land all shared services, like energy, with one building producing power from solar and fuel cells that is shared with other buildings to reduce peak demand? last_img read more

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first_imgSAN JOSE — Sharks coach Pete DeBoer was willing to forgive a few of the mistakes his team made in its first game back following the Christmas break and not judge his players too harshly after three days away.That included the play of Tomas Hertl, who had an up-and-down game Thursday in centering the Sharks’ third line against the Anaheim Ducks.In what was one of his few starts in the middle over the past season-and-a-half, Hertl won nine of his team-high 18 faceoffs against the Ducks. But …last_img

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first_imgDeciding not to sit back, Narain-Mohan began using her skills as an educator to teach her community how to engage and seek answers for their social problems. The centres also offered beauty and detoxing services for the first time in these areas, all contributing to a “feel good about yourself” lifestyle in previously disadvantaged communities. Education: Roslyn Narain-Mohan Janet Buckland – known simply as “Mama J” to the communities she works with in the Eastern Cape – has been responsible for the initiation and creation of a significant number of successful arts and culture projects in the province. With a PhD degree in visual performance training, Calder is a pioneer in this field and has created an exciting new sport science that is sought after by international coaches looking to bring an extra dimension to their game. Seven category winners and an overall winner were announced at the gala event, which will be broadcast by SABC 2 at 8pm on National Women’s Day, 9 August 2008. Other researchers have expanded on her work, and some of her micro-economic studies have been used in macro-economic modelling. The new science is based on the thinking that nothing happens in sport until the eye tells the body what to do. Calder first developed the technique she calls “Eyethink” in order to improve her own hockey game. Since its inception almost six years ago, Ubom! has reached audiences totalling more than 178 000. It also has provided 36 full-time contracts for actors to work in the Eastern Cape. Buckland raises the funds to sustain it herself. South Africa’s premier accolade for achievement by women has gone to Janet Buckland, who was named Shoprite Checkers/ SABC2 Woman of the Year 2008 at a dazzling event in celebration of the women of South Africa in Cape Town on 31 July. Ten years ago, Dr Veni Naidu gave up a high-powered and lucrative career in the corporate world in order to make a meaningful contribution to South Africa’s development. Consulting to the pediatric department of the Johannesburg Hospital, Jacklin acts as an “ombudsman” for such children, who do not fit into mainline education and struggle to fulfil their potential as they tend to be misdiagnosed and mistreated. She has created 41 jobs for women in these communities, developed some managerial positions to run the centres, and outsourced services such as accounting, laundry and security to local businesses. She represented South Africa in hockey between 1982 and 1996, gaining 50 international field hockey caps and 15 indoor caps. In 1995 she was selected to a team comprising the top 11 players in a pre-Olympic qualifying tournament. Professor Claire Penn was awarded South Africa’s Order of Mapungubwe in 2007 for her contribution to the field of speech and language pathology – especially in linguistics, sign language, child language and aphasia – and for groundbreaking research into the complexities of human communication. Business: Thabang Molefi Molefi’s next aim is to branch out into franchising in order to create more business and job opportunities. Besides the seven other centres she established in Gauteng, Kwazulu-Natal and the Free State, Molefi set up a mobile unit to visit communities in remote rural areas in the rest of the country. Roslyn Narain-Mohan, a teacher at the New West Secondary School in Durban, has become the “Mother Theresa” of her community, launching campaign after campaign to tackle virtually every form of social injustice affecting them. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Professor Sherylle Calder is a visual performance skills coach and world authority on the subject who has received back-to-back World Cup winners’ medals after training both the triumphant Springboks in 2007 and the English World Cup winners in 2003.center_img The winners in the seven categories – business, education, health, science and technology, social welfare, sport, and arts, culture and communications – each received R10 000 in prize money, while Buckland took home R30 000 as the overall winner. Health: Lorna Barbara Jacklin Professor Lorna Barbara Jacklin, principal consultant paediatrician at Wits University’s faculty of health sciences, has dedicated her life to improving the lives of children with mental health problems caused by physical disabilities or abuse. She combined her understanding of the value of the arts, particularly theatre, in the lives of all South Africans with her skills as a performer, director, fundraiser and administrator to direct these projects over a number of years. Today, the Roots Healthcare Centre business has branches in three South African provinces and a neighbouring country and boasts a multi-million rand turnover. Science and technology: Claire Penn Narain-Mohan’s community is a microcosm of a broader community affected by HIV/Aids, crime, racial conflict, poverty, age and individual suffering. Penn sees communication – a capacity which is complex, vulnerable and both a science and an art – as being at the heart of the human endeavour. For her, it can forge and sustain relationships but can equally be the main reason for breakdowns in understanding between individuals and communities. Social welfare: Veni Naidu Thabang Molefi is a qualified ethno-medical practitioner and beauty therapist who, with the little savings she had at the time, opened the first health spa in Soweto six years ago. The most notably project is Ubom! the Eastern Cape Drama Company, which was the first full-time professional drama company in the province. It brings theatre presentations and drama workshops to thousands of people in schools and communities all over the Eastern Cape. Sport: Sherylle Calder 8 August 2008 Untreated, mental health problems rob such children of a fair chance in life, translating into developmental and social problems as they grow into anti-social adults incapable of functioning independently. In her daily teaching and actions she encourages her pupils to seek solutions – which, for her, mean not just reaching out, but also identifying and understanding people’s real needs and the kind of support that would help people to help themselves in the long term. Arts, culture & communications (and overall winner) Naidu has received a doctorate for her groundbreaking research into the impact of HIV/Aids on businesses, families and communities. While most studies at the time focused on the medical aspects of HIV/Aids, Naidu investigated the economic and social impacts of the pandemic, completing the first study in South Africa on the impact HIV/Aids on income-earning urban households. Molefi’s pioneering centres introduced affordable health care to black communities through the use of the different but effective technique of iridology for diagnosis and herbs as prescribed medicines.last_img read more

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first_imgIn a series of five articles, we share stories from Gift of the Givers volunteers in their own words as the organisation marks its 25th year of serving humanity. We find out more from beekeeper, Owen Williams.Being involved with Gift of the Givers gives Owen Williams a sense of purpose. (Image: Owen Williams)Sulaiman PhilipSouth African humanitarian organisation Gift of the Givers, the largest African organisation of its kind, has brought aid and comfort to people in need in 43 countries.It has ongoing feeding programmes in South Africa, humanitarian missions in war-torn Syria and has helped to free South African hostages in Yemen and Mali. The group, founded and led by Dr Imtiaaz Sooliman, has helped to deliver water to drought stricken areas of South Africa and fed refugees in Somalia.William’s met Dr Sooliman while trying to rescue bee colonies that had survived the Knysna fires. (Image: Honeywood Farms)Owen Williams: BeekeeperI met Dr Sooliman for the first time on 15 June 2017 as Knysna was dealing with the fires that devastated the area. In hindsight it seemed that our paths were destined to cross.The day before, I got a phone call from Grant [Liversay, one of my partners in Honeychild Honey] asking how he coud help with protecting our hives. We had saved a few hives but the bees were starving; we needed to get sugar to make syrup to feed the surviving bees. We abhor artificial feeding, but it was either that or lose the colonies we had rescued.Despite his efforts – and Grant is not a man who understands the word no – we were only able to find a few broken bags of sugar from local supermarkets. Remember, the region had gone from extreme drought to a fire storm and back again. We were not the only beekeepers in dire straits.Grant had heard of this humanitarian organisation whose station was located in the mall. So he went up to them to ask if there was any chance they could spare a few bags of sugar. I can only imagine their thinking when faced with this manic, slightly built redhead asking for sugar. After explaining his need, Emily [Thomas], felt it was important enough to speak to Doc.I feel I should point out that Gift of the Givers was working around the clock but Doc wanted to know more about, as Grant said, “this bee story”. I don’t believe in co-incidence, but when the call came Meagan [Vermaas, William’s partner] was giving free therapeutic massages and I was delivering basic goods donated by the community.We met Doc, explained the need and how unique the Cape Honey bee was. Immediatley he wanted to know how Gift of the Givers could help, but he also wanted to see the bees. Back at Honeychild me, Meagan and Doc were all kitted out in beekeeping gear inspecting a colony I had rescued from the side of the N2.We pulled a frame from the hive, and right there in the middle of the comb was the queen. The sun was just beyond the apex and Doc’s face was lit up by the sun. I could see through the veil as he watched the queen and bees working. He looked so amazed and serene.Doc wanted to know how his organisation could help; he wanted to know our objectives. He suggested we set up an NPO – Hope for the Honeybee – and then Gift of the Givers donated R250,000. We ordered pollen substitute, bought sugar for syrup, collected data on losses, designed a strategy for feeding stations and contacted renowned bee scientists.From what I can tell, Hope for the Honeybee and the support from Gift of the Givers is a world first. In the middle of the kind of human suffering that we saw in Knysna, that they took the time to consider the plight of honey bees speaks to the aura of love and caring that surrounds them. I remember that look on Doc’s face when he was inspecting the hive, and my vision became clear. What we are doing is about the survival of the honeybee and benefits humankind as a whole. There are no personal agendas, just this aura that comes from giving.Through Hope for the Honeybee we are tools that spread the help that springs from Gift of the Givers. I read about the landslides in Freetown; hundreds have died. In the past I would have said a silent prayer. This time I found myself wondering if Gift of the Givers might be headed there and if there was a way I could go along.Williams joined the Gift of the Givers humanitarian mission in Knysna after meeting the team. (Image: Gift of the Givers)Read the next profile on Emily Thomas, who works in logitistics at Gift of the Givers.Our first profile was on medical co-ordinator, Dr YM Essack. Click here to read more.Ahmed Bham is the head of search and rescue. Read his story here.Orthopaedic surgeon, Dr Livan Meneses-Turino, shares his experience in Nepal, Haiti, and Palestine.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Jakob Wilson from JCW Farms in Madison County took time to visit with The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins about this year’s early harvest, what caught his eye at Farm Science Review and how he is a Top 4 Finalist in the American Star Ag Placement category at The National FFA Convention later this year.last_img

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first_imgWhat ‘missteps’? View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera LATEST STORIES Manny Pacquiao speaks to the media in Brisbane, Tuesday, June 27, 2017. Pacquiao, is putting his WBO belt on the line Sunday, July 2, against the 29-year-old Australian fighter Jeff Horn. (AP Photo/John Pye)BRISBANE, Australia—For all the claims and glowing reports that Manny Pacquiao is in tip-top shape for his battle with Jeff Horn on Sunday, Dundee Kim dares to go against the flow.“It’s rather strange, but Pacquiao looks like he didn’t prepare the work,” Kim told Filipino sportwriters after the press conference of the “Battle of Brisbane” at Suncorp Stadium on Wednesday. “He’s not ready.”ADVERTISEMENT Kim, a Korean who migrated here and serves as Horn’s conditioning coach, believes the hard work Pacquiao put in in the last three weeks of training camp won’t be enough to keep his World Boxing Organization welterweight crown.READ: Pacquiao-Horn nears selloutFEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It seems he underestimates Horn, and that’s a mistake.”According to Kim, he’s basing his judgment from what he’d seen in You Tube videos and Facebook posts in the last two months. He also senses Pacquiao’s condition through the color of his face, the eyes, and his movements. Standhardinger arrives from Germany, attends first Gilas practice Kim said he’s talking from experience.READ: Pacquiao out to give former school teacher Horn a boxing lesson“I’m not trying to scare, but my left body is really sore from the pounding I’d been getting from Horn in training.“If he connects without body shield, it’s gonna hurt,” said Kim, adding that he’s going on a holiday after the July 2 title fight to reset and recuperate. “I’ve nothing left, all my energy is gone.”Pacquiao, of course, always oozes with energy for every fight. Unless, Kim turns out to be a psychic or a fitness genius.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games MOST READ “His (Pacquiao) feet isn’t moving, his head isn’t moving, his power isn’t ready,” said Kim, who also serves as fitness guru of teams from South Korea, China, and Japan for the past ten years.Conditioning coach Dundee Kim. Photo by Roy LuarcaKim said his task is to develop Horn’s muscle mass and improve his speed through exercises and paddle work.And Kim believes he’s succeeded and Horn will deliver the “biggest shock in the world and throw it upside down.”READ: Two Filipinos in ‘Battle of Brisbane: Pacquiao vs Horn The 49-year-old, who’s a Pacquiao fan and a Christian as well, said Horn is a different animal from Pacquiao’s previous opponents.“The way I’ve trained him, his intensity right from the start all the way up to 12 rounds,” said Kim, who warned Pacquiao that he might get hurt by Horn.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Konglast_img read more

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first_imgThe Tamil Nadu police has informed the Madras High Court that they cannot book cricket maestro Sachin Tendulkar, tennis player Sania Mirza and TV host Mandira Bedi in a national flag insult case filed against them in the state.The state police department could not take action against the personalities without the central government’s permission, police told the Madras High Court Bench here.Police submitted that neither the accused belonged to Tamil Nadu nor were they available on the date of the complaint or on subsequent dates.Police filed the counter affidavit on Tuesday in response to a petition by an advocate, B Stalin, seeking a direction to a police inspector to register criminal cases against them under the Prevention of Insults to National Honour Act, 1971 and Emblems and Names (Prevention of Improper use) Act, 1950.When an offence was committed outside India, no prosecution under the Emblems and Names (Prevention of Improper use) Act could be instituted without central government’s sanction, the affidavit said.The lawyer should have approached the central government for proper sanction for prosecution, it said.According to the petitioner, while celebrating his birthday Sachin Tendulkar cut a cake which was in the national flag design at Jamaica On March 10,2010.Similarly on May 19,2010, Sania Mirza was resting her feet on a guitar painted in the tricolour while posing as a model for an International company.In Mandira’s case, she was wearing a sari with the national flag on its border,touching her feet, the petitioner said.- With inputs from PTIadvertisementlast_img read more

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