January 15, 2021
  • 7:46 am New communications programs debut at Champlain College
  • 7:44 am Announcing Exterus Business Furniture
  • 7:42 am PSB approves CVPS alternative regulation plan
  • 7:40 am Vermont SBA winners honored Wednesday under the big tent
  • 7:36 am Rutland documentary “THE BLOOD IN THIS TOWN” set for Oct. 23, 24

first_imgThe School of Cinematic Arts achieved the number one ranking for film schools nationwide in The Hollywood Reporter’s annual list for the fourth year in a row. The publication cited USC’s innovative virtual reality incubator as one reason the University received the top spot.USC recently partnered with Jaunt VR, a company that provides virtual reality cameras to immerse people in an all-encompassing viewing experience, to create the Jaunt Cinematic Virtual Reality Lab. The first stage of the lab will consist of a trial period to allow students and faculty to understand the program. Eventually, virtual reality classes will be offered once professors are familiar with the system.“I think what makes us a compelling choice is our focus on the future,” said Elizabeth Daley, dean of the School of Cinematic Arts. “The Hollywood Reporter mentioned our efforts in virtual reality. We believe our students have the talent to conceive and create exciting VR content, and we want them to have the technology to explore and experiment.”USC alum George Lucas’s $10 million donation to establish an endowment for minority scholarships further distinguishes SCA from other film schools, according to The Hollywood Reporter ranking. Each year, a group of minority students will be selected as George Lucas Scholars and receive financial assistance from the school. The goal of the scholarship fund is to help increase minority representation within the film industry, thus allowing more diverse perspectives to be showcased in theaters.“Diversity … might seem like an issue that is removed from technology,” Daley said. “But it’s also incredibly important to our industry’s future because we cannot continue to grow without being inclusive.”Daley also noted SCA’s prominent faculty, many of whom have won Academy Awards and have produced innovative works throughout their careers. Daley said that SCA’s mix of scholarly and professional faculty creates a more holistic experience for students.USC’s location near the Hollywood studios and other film companies, as well as its extensive alumni network in the industry, also likely plays a role in its success.“I think location matters a lot,” said Sadie Cibula, a freshman majoring in cinema and media studies. “A lot of people know USC. I went to a high school where a lot of my friends’ parents had been very successful in the entertainment industry after going to USC.”As of 2015, USC SCA alumni have collectively won 82 Oscars with 289 nominations as well as 129 Emmy wins and 607 nominations. On Sept. 18, more SCA graduates have the chance to win an Emmy.“We graduate students who are broadly educated in both the theory and practice of filmmaking,” Daley said. “They are not narrowly trained in one special area and so are able to move more quickly into their career. They know the history of the field, they know how to use the tools, and they have a vision for their own work.”last_img read more

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first_img Facebook “People really do want to go [to the movies] more often,” Lowe told Bloomberg. “They just don’t like the transaction.”The service is currently available to over 4,000 American theaters and more than 36,000 screens.Currently, the service is only available in the U.S., with a reported access to over 4,000 American theaters and more than 36,000 screens. According to Business Insider, that’s 91% of movie theaters across the country. However, with the stated goal of the company being to access consumer data, it is likely to expand beyond U.S. borders to reach more consumers soon.All that is required to sign up is a debit card, and as soon as your MoviePass arrives in the mail, you can start buying tickets via the company’s app. See you at the movies!by LIZ NORD – NFS Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Yes, it’s true: You can now go to the movies every single day for less than the cost of a Netflix subscription.In a move sure to please everyone who loves seeing movies on the big screen, theatrical subscription service MoviePass announced that it’s dropping its monthly fee to $9.95 for all users. That low rate gives subscribers entry to any movie (excluding IMAX and 3-D) at ANY theater in the system for any screening—even opening night. The absence of blackout dates and times is what the company refers to by calling its deal “unlimited”; your viewing is, in fact, limited to one movie per day.Originally, the subscription prices were scaled according to various factors such as geographic location, but with the addition of former Netflix executive Mitch Lowe to the CEO role at MoviePass, this standardized rate was enacted. Lowe believes that what’s keeping movie lovers away from theaters is not an addiction to offerings from his former company, but simply economic barriers. Twitterlast_img read more

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first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Have what it takes to be Canada’s next great writer? The 2018 CBC Nonfiction Prize is now open for submissions.You have until Feb. 28, 2018 to submit your original, unpublished work of nonfiction.The winner will receive $6,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts, attend a 10-day writing residency at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity and have their story published on CBC Books. Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Four finalists will win $1,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and have their story published on CBC Books.You may submit memoir, biography, humour writing, essay (including personal essay), travel writing or a feature article.All submissions are read by a committee of established Canadian writers. Three prominent Canadians comprise the jury, who determine the shortlist and the winner.The CBC Literary Prizes have been supporting and celebrating Canadian writers since 1979. Past winners include Michael Ondaatje, Michael Winter and Frances Itani.Check out all the past CBC Literary Prize winnersLast year’s winner was Becky Blake for Trust Exercise. You can read the entire 2017 shortlist here.How Becky Blake wrote the story that won the CBC Nonfiction PrizeThe deadline is Feb. 28 at 11:59 p.m. ET. A fee of $25.00 for administration purposes is required for each entry.9 mistakes to avoid when submitting to the CBC Literary PrizesThe 2018 CBC Poetry Prize will open in April 2018. The 2019 CBC Short Story Prize will open in September 2018.Have questions? Email us at canadawrites@cbc.ca.Ready to submit? Enter here!last_img read more

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