September 8, 2020
  • 3:27 pm “Preval – a worthy son of Haiti” says Moise
  • 3:26 pm Bolt donates world record breaking limited edition Puma spikes to charity
  • 3:24 pm Allan Cole Jr is dead at 45
  • 3:24 pm HPV vaccine for Jamaican students
  • 3:23 pm Vintage gold in Coral Springs as “Genuine Gold”

first_imgThe son of former Jamaican footballer, Allan “Skill” Cole has died. Allan Cole, Jr., age 45 died suddenly on Monday morning in Jamaica.Cole Jr’s son found him lying on the ground, unresponsive. He was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead. Suspected heart attackIt is being speculated that Cole Jr died of a heart attack, but family members and friends are awaiting the results of an autopsy to confirm the cause of death.His father’s football boots were big ones to fill, but the younger Cole was no rabbit on the football field. He was a former captain of the Excelsior High School Manning Cup team, and played alongside Jamaican football legend Walter Boyd. Outpouring of tributesThere have been an outpouring of tributes paid to Cole Jr since news of his death broke.“Just heard news that my brother Ali Cole died suddenly. It is hard but condolences to his children, parents and loved ones. Sleep in P Ali,” one man wrote on Facebook.An Excelsior High School past student, who was apparently a close friend of the deceased, wrote in a school community page on Facebook: “It was on Saturday I spoke to you never knowing that would be last time I would see you. I pray that your soul may rest in peace Allan “Ally” Cole Jr. Your presence will be truly missed.”Cole Sr was a confidante and manager of late reggae legend Bob Marley and was instrumental in Marley’s forays into Ethiopia and Zimbabwe where Marley performed at a famous independence concert. He also played football with Marley at Marley’s Hope Road residence in Kingston, Jamaica.last_img read more

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first_imgAs Guyana celebrates Amerindian Heritage Month, Executive member of the PPP Dr Frank Anthony believes that Government should be steadfast in promoting the various Amerindian languages.PPP Member of Parliament, Dr Frank AnthonyAccording to Dr Anthony, many of the words accepted in today’s society have been derived from native languages of the Amerindians, and thus more effort should be invested into promoting them.Many of the languages are deemed endangered, threatened, or vulnerable; and this has been confirmed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO).UNESCO’s reason for the classification of these languages comes from the steady decline in the amount of persons speaking indigenous languages, and cases wherein teaching these languages is not undertaken.“This year, I wished that more emphasis could be placed on promoting the different Amerindian languages. In Guyana, the value of these Amerindian languages has mostly gone unappreciated… Currently, UNESCO has flagged these languages as critically endangered, threatened or vulnerable. This is because there has been a steady decline in the number of persons speaking the languages, and in many cases there isn’t any serious attempt to teach the languages to the current generation” Dr Anthony related.In addition, Dr Anthony is of the view that Government should make all attempts to invest resources which will be used in a long-term basis in conserving these different indigenous Languages.“The Government of Guyana must have a clearly articulated policy, and must set aside the resources to ensure that the policies and programmes are implemented correctly in the various communities. For some time now, I have been advocating for the creation of an Amerindian Language Institute staffed with linguists who can conduct research, develop teaching material, and use it to teach the languages to the various communities,” Dr Anthony revealed.Dr Anthony also pointed out that the Government, together with the Amerindian leaders and other associations, should make promoting the Indigenous languages a matter of urgent national conversation.“Our Amerindian leaders, academia, civil society and Government must have an urgent national conversation on what can and should be done for the promotion of these languages. As we celebrate the Amerindian Heritage Month, one of the best ways to do so is to take concrete steps to promote the linguistic heritage of our Amerindian communities,” he advised.last_img read more

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