October 24, 2020
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first_imgTopics : Researchers also noted the air conditioning simply recirculated the air inside the bus, which likely contributed to spreading of the virus.”The investigations suggest that, in closed environments with air recirculation, SARS-CoV-2 is a highly transmissible pathogen,” they wrote, referring to the name of the virus.”Our finding of potential airborne transmission has important public health significance.”Their study, which includes a diagram showing where each infected passenger sat, adds to the evidence of airborne transmission, including research into how the virus spread between diners’ tables at a restaurant in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou. Researchers believe a passenger, whose gender was not identified, was likely patient zero because the person had been in contact with people from Wuhan, the city where the contagion emerged late last year.The scientists managed to map out where the other passengers sat, and also test them for the virus, with 23 of 68 passengers subsequently confirmed as infected on the same bus.What is notable is that the sickness infected people in the front and back of the bus, outside the perimeter of 1-2 meters (three-six feet) that authorities and experts say infectious droplets can travel.On top of that, the sick passenger was not yet showing symptoms of the disease, such as a cough, when the group made their trip to a religious event.center_img A person on a poorly ventilated Chinese bus infected nearly two-dozen other passengers with coronavirus even though many weren’t sitting close by, according to research published on Tuesday that offers fresh evidence the disease can spread in the air.Health authorities had initially discounted the possibility that simply breathing could send infectious micro-droplets into the air, but did a U-turn as experts piled on pressure and evidence mounted.The article published Tuesday in JAMA Internal Medicine probes the threat of airborne infection by taking a close look at passengers who made a 50-minute trip to a Buddhist event in the eastern Chinese city of Ningbo aboard two buses in January before face masks became routine against the virus.last_img read more

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first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Announces Consumer Financial Protection Initiative November 12, 2015center_img Economy,  Efficiency,  Government That Works,  Press Release,  Results,  Seniors Harrisburg, PA – Today, at the opening of the Ann B. Barshinger Financial Empowerment Center, Governor Wolf announced a consumer financial protection initiative.“Today, I am announcing the administration’s Consumer Financial Protection Initiative in order to educate the public about financial protection and best practices in a concise, efficient way,” said Governor Wolf.Secretary Robin Wiessmann began consolidating roles and breaking down institutional silos within the Department of Banking and Securities, looked at new ways to get things done, and developed new and more effective ways to meet consumer needs for financial education.During this process, Brian LaForme who is the director of the Department of Banking and Securities outreach program, took office and staff from within the department, consolidated and integrated their work into a new “Financial Services for Consumers and Business” division.The initiative, which is part of Governor Wolf’s “Government that Works” tour, has four goals.The first goal is to help protect consumers from illegal, “easy money” types of lending from out-of-state companies. These predatory loans, which are heavily advertised on the Internet, might seem appealing during the cash crunch of the holidays, but they can create huge financial hangovers for the borrower in the new year.Working cooperatively with PennDOT, the Department of Banking and Securities will shortly begin sharing information from trusted sources with consumers who are at risk of losing their cars to companies offering “easy money” loans using car titles as collateral.Secondly, this initiative will help health care and legal professionals identify signs of elder financial abuse and prevent this crime. As our commonwealth population grows older, more of our senior citizens are at risk of having their hard-earned retirement savings stolen.Working with the Investor Protection Trust and the Department of Aging, the Department of Banking and Securities will be stepping up efforts to reach the professional communities our seniors most depend upon with information and resources to help them better cope with this threat to our community of senior citizens.The third goal is working to find new ways to help working adults save for their retirements. Not enough people in this country currently facing retirement have saved enough money to have the kind of retirement they want.The Department of Banking and Securities is working on creating awareness of existing tools that working adults can use to create the kind of nest eggs they need. The department is also looking for and studying new approaches for consumers to ensure their financial futures in retirement.Finally, this initiative works to establish a state government interagency financial education exchange for consumers. More than a dozen Pennsylvania state agencies offer some form of financial education and consumer outreach. Until now, these agencies have not shared information with each other about what services they offer consumers or even what information they share with consumers.This exchange will help ensure that state agencies work in a coordinated fashion. For instance, if you call the Banking Department on an issue actually related to, say, insurance or unemployment compensation or taxes, you will actually get referred to the right agency that can answer your question. This exchange will help ensure that state agencies will not distribute potentially conflicting information with consumers.This exchange is working to create a portal of information from trusted sources — a “one-stop shop” for help on financial services and products.Earlier this year on the “Government that Works” tour, Governor Wolf gave remarks at the opening of Hulton Bridge, signed an executive order designed to correct the course of the Commonwealth with respect to state contracting opportunities for small diverse businesses, announced a plan to enhance the health insurance coverage available to all Pennsylvania children enrolled in the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and instituted online voter registration.# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

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first_imgThe Office of Student Affairs and the consultant team for the USC Bicycle Master Plan presented a review of the planning process Thursday and outlined proposed solutions to bicycle congestion on campus, which includes the designation of specific bike lanes on campus.Alison Kendall, a principle architect at Kendall Planning + Design, a firm hired in October to work with Student Affairs and the Dept. of Public Safety to help solve the ongoing issues related to bikes, spoke at the event held at Tommy’s Place.Proposed bike plans would create designated bike lanes along Trousdale Parkway, Downey Way and McClintock Avenue. | Photo courtesy of USC“Basically, what we began is a systematic approach to looking at bikes on campus,” Kendall said. “Our general concept is to have certain roadways on campus that are marked by direction where it is safe [to ride a bike].”Twenty-five percent of undergraduates have had a collision with a bicycle within the last year, Kendall said.To increase safety on campus, the consultants suggest that separate bike lanes be created on all major roadways on campus, including McClintock Avenue, Trousdale Parkway, Downey Way and 34th Street.“While not wanting to be overly restrictive, there is obviously a need to regulate,” Kendall said. “We need to develop a progressive enforcement approach.”Consultants also presented plans to add more secure bike racks around campus, bike repair and services centers and a bike sharing and rental program as an alternative to owning a bike.Kendall Planning + Design spoke to students and faculty , including 20 student and staff organizations, about the bike issues, and reviewed accident data involving bicycles on campus. The firm also looked at other universities, such as Stanford University that have implemented bike safety programs on their campuses.About 200 people provided their input at the first bike summit on Jan. 18, and 2,000 people responded to an online survey about the bikes.Consultants on the project also determined that most cyclists at USC are inexperienced.“Many undergrad cyclists had never really biked before,” Kendall said. “As a result, they have a very limited understanding of how to bike in an urban setting.”To remedy this issue, Kendall Planning + Design has suggested a program to educate cyclists at USC, which would potentially include classes on safety, bike tours around campus, videos offering biking tips and outreach from groups such as peer health educators, residential advisers and DPS.Tom Studdert, director of orientation programs, said none of these plans have been finalized. USC administrators are set to discuss the plan at their meeting in early May.“From there, an implementation plan will be developed. It’s not just an overnight process,” Studdert said.Deike Peters, an adjunct assistant professor of urban planning, and graduate students from a Bike Planning Studio course in the Sol Price School of Public Policy also presented their specific research material and suggestions at the event. The students worked closely with Kendall Planning + Design on the project.last_img read more

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