January 23, 2021
  • 9:38 am Jamestown Public Schools Hosting Virtual College Tours This Week
  • 9:34 am President Trump, Joe Biden To Hold Competing Town Halls This Week
  • 9:33 am 63-Year-Old Man Dies Following Four-wheeler Crash In Cattaraugus County
  • 7:48 am Tony Nominee Kenny Leon on Broadway-Bound Holler If Ya Hear Me: ‘Hopefully, It Will Change the World’
  • 7:44 am Lessons of the Week! Kristin Chenoweth, Chris O’Dowd & More

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:Angola is expecting to kickstart its dormant solar sector by deploying several hundred megawatts worth of projects within three years, a top government official has said. Speaking in the capital Luanda, energy minister João Baptista Borges predicted that nationwide PV capacity will reach 600MW by 2022, up from the 10MW-plus figures recorded this year.At an event a the U.S. embassy this week, Baptista Borges said the roll-out of 30,000 individual systems is feasible if the private sector steps in to back the transition. “There is a need to create a vehicle to secure funding for the electrification of rural areas,” the minister said, in statements aired by government news agency ANGOP.In Angola, the rise in policymaker interest in solar PV comes as analysts describe the African state as a largely untapped PV hotspot, thanks to irradiation levels in the 1,350-2,100 kWh/m2/year range. As the German Solar Association (BSW-Solar) and the Becquerel Institute noted this year, the government’s own figures place Angola’s solar potential at 55GW, far above wind’s 3GW. In a report released in mid-May, as Intersolar 2019 got underway in Munich, the authors pointed at the government’s efforts to tap into clean energy to bolster rural electrification rates.The minister’s talk this week of a 600MW solar market by 2022 outstrips some of the government’s earlier goals, including a target for PV capacity to hit 200MW nationwide by 2025. As BSW-Solar and the Becquerel pointed out in May, the country has shown interest in coming on board the World Bank’s Scaling Solar programme, which has helped unlock PV growth in countries like Senegal, Zambia and Ethiopia.More: Angola eyeing 600MW solar market within three years Angola looks to kickstart solar development effortslast_img read more

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first_img November 1, 2003 Regular News Henry Marinello has joined Pertnoy, Solowsky & Allen, P.A., with offices located at 150 W. Flagler St., Ste. 2000, Miami 33130, telephone (305) 371-2223. He practices in civil litigation, corporate and commercial litigation, real estate, family law, and immigration law. Richard S. Annunziata has joined Henderson Franklin, with offices at Bonita Bay Executive Center II, 3461 Bonita Bay Blvd., Ste. 220, Bonita Springs 34134, telephone (239) 498-6222. He practices in civil and commercial litigation. Robert E. Linkin and Edward P. Degenhardt have joined Sacher, Zelman, Van Sant, Paul, Beiley, Hartman, Terzo, Rolnick & Waldman, P.A., with offices at 1401 Brickell Ave., 7th Fl., Miami 33131, telephone (305) 371-8797. Linkin practices in general corporate and securities law; Degenhardt practices in securities litigation, securities regulatory compliance, and complex commercial litigation. Kandell & Kandell announces the relocation of its offices to 2665 S. Bayshore Dr., Ste. 900, Coconut Grove 33133, telephone (305) 858-2220. The firm concentrates in personal injury law and civil litiagation. Angela M. Armstrong, formerly of Angela L. Morton, P.A., has joined McFarland, Gould, Lyons, Sullivan & Hogan, P.A., with offices at 311 S. Missouri Ave., Clearwater 33756 and at 3490 E. Lake Rd., Ste. B, Palm Harbor 34685, telephone (727) 461-1111. She concentrates in bankruptcy law. Claire Diaz has joined Sacher, Zelman, Van Sant, Paul, Beiley, Hartman, Terzo, Rolnick & Waldman, P.A., with offices at 1401 Brickell Ave., 7th Fl., Miami 33131, telephone (305) 371-8797. She concentrates in commercial litigation. Cheryl Wilke has become partner-in-charge of Hinshaw & Culbertson, with offices at One E. Broward Blvd., Ste. 1010, Ft. Lauderdale 33301, telephone (954) 467-7900. She practices in risk management and workers’ compensation defense. Erika G. Nikla has become an associate of Berman & Norton Breman, P.A., with offices at 401 S. Florida Ave., Ste. 300, Tampa 33602, telephone (813) 301-0043. She joins the creditors’ rights, bankruptcy, and commercial litigation division. Juliana Rowland McFarland, former associate of Foley & Lardner, Jacksonville, has become an assistant general counsel with the City of Jacksonville Office of the General Counsel, with offices at City Hall, 117 W. Duval St., Ste. 480, Jacksonville 32202, telephone (904) 630-1714. She joins the government operations and commercial law department. Martin B. Kofsky, formerly of counsel with Kirkpatrick & Lockhart announces the opening of the Law Offices of Martin B. Kofsky, P.A., with offices at 200 S.E. 1st St., Ste. 705, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 205-6175. He practices in healthcare, general business law, commercial litigation and general insurance coverage. Rodolfo Pittaluga, Jr., and David Softness, formerly of Akerman Senterfitt, have joined Holland & Knight, L.L.P., with offices at 701 Brickell Ave., Ste. 3000, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 349-2253. Pittaluga practices in bankruptcy and securities litigation matters; Softness practices in bankruptcy and creditors’ rights. Justin Zinzow has joined Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster & Russell, P.A., with offices at 150 Second Ave. N., Ste. 1700, St. Petersburg 33701, telephone (727) 895-1971. He joins the firm’s litigation practice group. Mia A. Burroughs and Devang Desai have joined Steel, Hector & Davis, L.L.P., with offices at 200 S. Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 4000, Miami 33131-2398, telephone (305) 577-7000. Burroughs joins the firm’s litigation practice and Desai joins the government and regulatory and bankruptcy litigation practices. Melissa Segarra has joined Steel, Hector & Davis, L.L.P., with offices at 1900 Phillips Point W., 777 S. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561) 650-7200. She joins the litigation practice. Karen A. Foxman has joined Rice Rose & Snell, with offices at 222 Seabreeze Blvd., Daytona Beach 32118, telephone (386) 257-1222. She concentrates in criminal and family law. Christian E. Blalock, formerly of Greenberg Traurig, P.A., has become an assistant general counsel with the City of Jacksonville Office of the General Counsel, with offices at City Hall, 117 W. Duval St., Ste. 480, Jacksonville 32202, telephone (904) 630-7130. She joins the government operations and commercial law department. November 1, 2003 On the Movelast_img read more

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first_imgWHEN competition in the West Demerara leg of the GFF/NAMILCO Thunderbolt Flour Power National Intra-Association Under-17 League continues tomorrow, home team Den Amstel will be seeking to record yet another win.The red-hot side will be seeking to add Stewartville to their list of casualties when the two collide at the Den Amstel Community Centre ground from 12:00hrs. In their latest match last Sunday, Den Amstel edged Slingerz FC 4-3 in an exciting clash.The home team wasted little time in sending a clear message to Slingerz, the reigning Elite League Champions of Guyana.A brace each from Ruben Dainty and Keswin Fraser was a clear enough message to Slingerz and the rest of the teams in the competition of what Den Amstel’s overall aim is.Dainty hit the back of the net in the 2nd and 35th minutes while Fraser followed suit in the 3rd and 70th. Slingerz struck in the 6th minute when Odel Duncan slammed in the first of a brace for him also but it was not enough to unsettle Den Amstel.Duncan was again on the score sheets in the 47th minute to further reduce the score line; and even with a 57th minute strike from Ronaldo Macey, which added to the excitement of the match, Slingerz still found themselves one goal short at the end of full time which handed Den Amstel the win and full points.Last Saturday’s encounter which should have brought together Wales United and Beavers resulted in the former gaining full points without breaking a sweat as the latter side failed to show up.last_img read more

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first_img(REUTERS) – India Test captain Virat Kohli remains sceptical on the accuracy of ball-tracking technology but hinted India might be ready to finally embrace the Decision Review System (DRS).The influential Indian cricket board (BCCI) has been a staunch opponent of the DRS system, which aims at reducing umpiring howlers by detecting edges and predicting ball trajectory to get correct catch and leg-before decisions.The BCCI does not allow DRS in bilateral series involving its team but Kohli said they had been discussing the issue for a while.“We want to definitely think about it but it’s something we have had discussion on and certainly look to probably introduce it in future,” Kohli said on the eve of the second Test against New Zealand at Kolkata’s Eden Gardens.“These are the things we have had meetings on. There were areas which we felt can be debated … specially the ball-tracking and the Hawk-Eye.”“We won’t take (erroneous umpiring) decisions too hard because we in the first place decided that we won’t use DRS. For us to say then that umpires made an error and it’s going against us, it’s not logical.“Once DRS is in place, once DRS is up and running for us as well, then you can say what are the grey areas.”Addressing media in place of New Zealand skipper Kane Williamson, who is down with a bug, opener Tom Latham vouched for technology.“I suppose we’ve had it in the past back home and it is a good system that tends to work,” the left-hander said.“It gets rid of that decision that probably isn’t out or is out, that major decision that is called incorrectly. We enjoyed it back home, if (India started using it) that’d be great.”Williamson skipped training but would be available as the tourists seek to level the series after losing the series opener in Kanpur, Latham said.“Kane is a little bit ‘crook’ today so he won’t be training. There is no discomfort, he is just down with a bug. Nothing too major, he is just resting up and getting right for tomorrow.”Kohli confirmed off-spinner Ravichandran Ashwin, who claimed half the Kiwi wickets in Kanpur despite bowling with a corn on his middle finger, was available for the match.The India captain did not rule out off-spinner Jayant Yadav making his Test debut in a three-pronged spin attack.“We felt adding an off-spinner, because they have five left-handers in their batting line-up, would help us at a stage where possibly we are looking to play three spinners,” Kohli said.“The whole idea was to bring in another guy who can bowl at the left-handers.”last_img read more

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first_imgMILWAUKEE — Nothing says summer like baseball. And nothing says baseball like Mr. Baseball himself, Bob Uecker.Some might argue for Vin Scully, but as a Wisconsin native there’s no one I’d rather hear call a baseball game than Uke.Especially on a pitch that’s “juuuuust a bit outside.”Columnist Mike Bauman put it best Tuesday, writing: “Listening to Uecker broadcast a game is like listening to the funniest guy at your neighborhood bar. The difference is that Uecker is simultaneously dispensing completely accurate information and insight about an event that is going on even as the one-liners keep coming.”That’s why Tuesday’s announcement that Uecker was going to have heart surgery Friday and miss 10-12 weeks of games came as such a shock to so many.For Uecker, a Milwaukee native, the nearly three-month absence will be his longest since beginning his baseball career as a player in 1956 with the Milwaukee Braves and broadcasting career in 1971.Previously he had missed more than a month in 1991 after having surgery to repair two abdominal aortic aneurysms. Aside from that, Uecker has been a constant fixture in baseball for nearly 55 years, with all but four of them being in Milwaukee.As word began to spread about Uecker’s heart surgery Tuesday, there was an incredible outpouring of support for the 75-year-old Brewers broadcaster. Several players, including Prince Fielder, Craig Counsell and Casey McGehee, stood by during the press conference to show their support for Uecker, who is considered by the players to be “part of the team.”Afterward, the sentiments expressed by a pair of Wisconsin natives rang true for me, and showed just why the heart surgery of the Brewers broadcaster means so much to so many.“Baseball is every day, and he becomes part of your summer,” Counsell, who grew up in Whitefish Bay, said. “It’s going to be like one of your friends is gone.”“You have a lot of people in different parts of the country that talk about someone being a voice. But Uecker has been here from the beginning. He is the Brewers,” Pirates pitcher and Racine native Jack Taschner told MLB.com. “Obviously, I hope the best for him. He is everything to baseball in Milwaukee.“Bud Selig saved the team, but Bob Uecker is the voice.”Need further proof that Uecker is an essential part of Brewers baseball?Take a look around Miller Park.In left field, there’s the sign that reads, “Get up, get up, get outta here, gone!” High above right field, Uecker’s name, with the No. 50 marking his more than half century in baseball, hangs alongside four Brewers greats — Hank Aaron, Rollie Fingers, Robin Yount and Paul Molitor — and Jackie Robinson.Without Uke, baseball in Milwaukee just won’t be quite the same.Still, it’s important to remember one thing: He’s not dead, nor is he dying.He’s simply having the aortic valve and a portion of his aortic root in his heart replaced. As his doctor said in the press conference yesterday, no heart surgery is ever routine, but it is a commonly performed operation.With that in mind, we’d all do well to follow the lead of Uecker himself. Staring at heart surgery in just a few days, Uecker opened the press conference the only way he knew how: With a deadpanned one-liner.“A lot of you don’t know, some do,” he said. “I have been added to the active roster.”On a day when he was announcing he’d have heart surgery and be away from the game and team that he loves, Uecker still wanted to keep things light.As Brewers manager Ken Macha said after the press conference during his daily briefing with reporters, Uecker has a positive attitude about him that’s contagious.Having met Uecker earlier this month, I can attest to that. Seeing Uke at the ballpark, talking to him about baseball — or professional wrestling on one occasion — it brings a smile to your face and brightens your day a little bit.“No matter what, he’s always a happy person,” Brewers first baseman Prince Fielder said. “He has a good aura about him. Whenever he’s around, it’s a good time.”As the Brewers travel to the west coast this weekend, Uecker will not be with them. Undoubtedly, his voice, the voice of Brewers baseball, will be missed.Taking his place alongside Cory Provus, for at least the current road trip, will be former Major Leaguer and FSN broadcaster Davey Nelson. It will likely be a bit of a tough trip for both of them in Uecker’s absence.Taking over full time for a legend like Uecker is no small task for Provus, who previously alternated every two innings with Uke.Likewise, Nelson will be called upon for color commentary, something Uecker provides plenty of in addition to his play-by-play. Certainly, it will not be fair to compare Nelson or Provus to the legendary Mr. Baseball, but inevitably that is what will happen, and there’s simply no way either could possibly measure up.Of course, if it were up to Uecker, that wouldn’t even be an issue.“I’ll be broadcasting right from the O.R.,” Uecker joked during the second inning of Wednesday’s game.You get the feeling that if they would let him do it, he would.As Jim Gantner said before Tuesday’s game, “There’s only one Bob Uecker.”Uke certainly will be missed, but the silver lining is that he will be back, and it will be, just as he would say, “Nice. Real Nice.”Jordan is a senior majoring in journalism and political science. Have a favorite memory of Bob Uecker that you’d like to share? E-mail him at jschelling@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

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