October 20, 2020
  • 8:29 am Gun insurance may help curb shootings
  • 8:25 am GE should expand its applicant pool
  • 8:24 am Letters to the Editor for Monday, June 10
  • 1:33 am Niche market
  • 1:33 am Better the devil you know

first_imgThe five-time Ballon d’Or winner tested positive on Monday, the day after Portugal drew 0-0 with France in Paris, and returned to Italy on his private jet on Wednesday.Juventus president Andrea Agnelli said Thursday that his club had respected sporting protocol, referring to the “Ministries of Health and the Interior” to find out which rules Ronaldo had broken.”Cristiano Ronaldo returned to Italy with a medical flight authorized by the competent health authorities at the request of the player and will continue his isolation at his home,” Juventus said in a statement.The entire Juventus team was back in isolation on Wednesday evening after US midfielder Weston McKennie tested positive.  Cristiano Ronaldo may have violated Italian COVID-19 measures by traveling to Portugal while Juventus was in isolation, returning to Turin this week after testing positive, Italy’s sports minister Vincenzo Spadafora said on Thursday.”Yes, I think so, if there were no specific authorizations from the health authority,” Spadafora told Radio Uno when asked whether the 35-year-old Portuguese star had breached COVID-19 rules.Ronaldo risks a fine after joining his national side last week despite Juventus being in isolation after two staff members tested positive. Both McKennie and Ronaldo are in quarantine, for at least 10 days, and must test negative before rejoining their teammates.”I think that, at the moment, the protocols in force for the sports championships, both for Serie A soccer and for the sports associations and clubs are valid as long as they are respected,” said Spadafora. “And if there is someone who does not respect them, then the cases that we read in the news are created.”Under UEFA rules a player must provide evidence that he is no longer sick a week before a European match.Ronaldo, who will miss Juventus’ Champions League opener against Dynamo Kiev on Oct.20, must test negative on Oct.21 to play against Barcelona a week later.Topics :last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, Mich. — We have an update on yesterday’s story about two Saginaw men who drove to Alpena and were arrested after selling salt in place of methamphetamine.22–year–old John Harvey Gaddy and 17–year–old Duron Louis Lowe were arrested and lodged at the Alpena County Jail after a drug deal gone wrong.The two men traveled to Alpena to sell salt in place of meth to two Alpena females.The two women realized they were sold salt not meth and hunted down Lowe and Gaddy driving into the back of their car.According to Public Information Officer, Lt. Derrick Carroll, the investigation is still open and  at this time the women are not being charged.Lowe and Gaddy remain lodged at the Alpena County Jail where they are awaiting representation.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Millage results in the 2020 Primary ElectionNext Marine researchers work together to map the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuarylast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgFacebook78Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Bob Terhune, Capital Lakefair Military LiaisonThe 50-foot-long, 62-year-old, antique wooden boat, OLD MAN IV, which serves as a ceremonial platform for the U. S. Navy, will arrive at the City of Olympia’s Percival Landing on Thursday, July 18 between 12 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. where it will be greeted by the Capital Lakefair Queen, Princesses and Capital Lakefair members who are known as Capitalarians.The Command Cutter, which is powered by twin diesel engines, will be open for public visitors on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 19, 20 and 21 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. A vintage Admiral’s Barge, OLD MAN IV was built in 1957 by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) in Bremerton the same year, 1957, that Capital Lakefair was begun in Olympia. Back then this area was known as the 13th Naval District. Today it is Navy Region Northwest, commanded by Rear Admiral Christopher S. “Scotty” Gray, who took charge on June 20, 2018, just over a year ago. The Boat Crew for this year’s visit consists of: Chief Quartermaster (Surface Warfare) William Kearns, Boat Officer, Boatswain’s Mate First Class (Surface Warfare) Shavar Hillery, Boat Coxswain, and Engineman Second Class (Surface Warfare) Branden Caligiuri, Boat Engineer.During Lakefair week the members of the Navy Boat Crew will represent the Navy and Navy Region Northwest in several Lakefair events, including Thursday evening’s Royalty Program and Saturday’s 5:00 p.m. Capital Lakefair Grand Parade.For more information, visit the Capital Lakefair website.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgBy Kathy MieleIt was after dinner and my son Alex and I were taking a walk around the neighborhood.We didn’t have to go far before the fragrance of our neighbors’ grill seemed to fill the air. I inhaled deeply. “I have to say I love the smell of a steak cooking on the grill,” I said to Alex as we were busy walking off our dinner of hamburgers that I’d cooked on the stove.“It does smell good,” Alex agreed. We walked a little further when he turned to me and asked, “Why don’t we barbecue anymore?”“That’s a good question.” We’d made it to the end of the block when a new smell overwhelmed us. “Wow, whatever they’re cooking, it sure was marinated with a lot of garlic! It smells great!”As we walked further along I tried to think of when we’d used our grill last. It had been so long ago that I couldn’t even remember if we had any propane left in the tank. We hadn’t grilled this season and I’m pretty sure we didn’t last summer either.“Your dad’s not big on grilling.” I explained.“Why does Dad have to be the one at the grill?” Alex asked. “You could do it.”“Are you kidding? I’m busy getting everything ready in the kitchen!” I argued. “I can’t be walking outside every 5 minutes checking on a piece of meat! It’s easier for me to just cook it inside with everything else!”“O.k.,” Alex sounded wary. “I didn’t mean to get you upset.”“I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to snap at you,” I apologized. “I’m just not big on grill cooking.”We walked a few blocks more in silence until we came across a new smell. “Someone’s cooking with charcoal.” I said. “I have to say I love the smell of lighter fluid.”“Isn’t lighter fluid like gasoline?” Alex asked. “It can’t be good for you.”“I’m sure it’s not good for you but nobody really thought about that when I was a kid.” I had to smile when a favorite memory popped into my head. “My dad would use so much lighter fluid you could actually taste it on the burger,” I told Alex.“I think I’d rather skip the charcoal grill and stick with the propane,” Alex said as he kicked a stone down the road.“You know I could teach you how to cook on the grill,” I said.“Why would I want to do that?” Alex asked.“It’s a great skill to learn.”“Let’s see,” Alex said then thought for a moment. “You don’t cook on the grill and neither does Dad but somehow you think I’m going to like doing it?”“I didn’t say you’d like doing it. I really can’t think of anyone who likes standing outside during a heat wave and cooking over an open flame. It’s really all about the flavor you get when you cook on a barbecue.”“You know what I like the flavor of?” Alex said. “The cheeseburger you made tonight. It was perfect!”“I’m getting the feeling that I’m not going to be able to talk you into manning the grill this summer.”“Nope.” We were coming around the corner of our block and our walk was almost over. Alex gave me a quick pat on the back. “But, that was a really great try.”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgMIDDLETOWN – Approximately 60 firefighters from four Middletown fire companies turned out early Monday morning to put out a fire in the Up in Smoke Cigar Lounge that was reported by Middletown police officers on routine patrol.Fire Department Public Information Officer John Isaksen reported police called in the blaze at 12:30 a.m. Jan. 18 when they noticed the working structure fire. Volunteers from Belford Independent, Belford Engine, Port Monmouth and Community fire companies responded, under the command of Department Chief Rick Hibell. They reported they had the fire under control within 20 minutes.Second Assistant Fire Ryan Clarke was among the first of the officers on the scene at the unoccupied commercial structure at 900 Main St.Firefighters began fighting the blaze with a 2 ½ inch hose line through the front door; they cut holes in the roof to vent heat and toxic smoke from the structure.Community Fire Company stood by as a Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC) ready to provide assistance to firefighters that may become trapped or injured while performing interior firefighting duties.  According to officials, there was smoke and water damage throughout the building but no reports any of the inventory went up in smoke.Middletown Township Fire Department’s Air Support and Fire Police units, as well as township EMS units stood by during the incident. No injuries were reported.The fire is being investigated by the Middletown Township Fire Prevention office.Pictures Courtesy of MTFD Photographer Laurie Kegley.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgDeciding not to sit back, Narain-Mohan began using her skills as an educator to teach her community how to engage and seek answers for their social problems. The centres also offered beauty and detoxing services for the first time in these areas, all contributing to a “feel good about yourself” lifestyle in previously disadvantaged communities. Education: Roslyn Narain-Mohan Janet Buckland – known simply as “Mama J” to the communities she works with in the Eastern Cape – has been responsible for the initiation and creation of a significant number of successful arts and culture projects in the province. With a PhD degree in visual performance training, Calder is a pioneer in this field and has created an exciting new sport science that is sought after by international coaches looking to bring an extra dimension to their game. Seven category winners and an overall winner were announced at the gala event, which will be broadcast by SABC 2 at 8pm on National Women’s Day, 9 August 2008. Other researchers have expanded on her work, and some of her micro-economic studies have been used in macro-economic modelling. The new science is based on the thinking that nothing happens in sport until the eye tells the body what to do. Calder first developed the technique she calls “Eyethink” in order to improve her own hockey game. Since its inception almost six years ago, Ubom! has reached audiences totalling more than 178 000. It also has provided 36 full-time contracts for actors to work in the Eastern Cape. Buckland raises the funds to sustain it herself. South Africa’s premier accolade for achievement by women has gone to Janet Buckland, who was named Shoprite Checkers/ SABC2 Woman of the Year 2008 at a dazzling event in celebration of the women of South Africa in Cape Town on 31 July. Ten years ago, Dr Veni Naidu gave up a high-powered and lucrative career in the corporate world in order to make a meaningful contribution to South Africa’s development. Consulting to the pediatric department of the Johannesburg Hospital, Jacklin acts as an “ombudsman” for such children, who do not fit into mainline education and struggle to fulfil their potential as they tend to be misdiagnosed and mistreated. She has created 41 jobs for women in these communities, developed some managerial positions to run the centres, and outsourced services such as accounting, laundry and security to local businesses. She represented South Africa in hockey between 1982 and 1996, gaining 50 international field hockey caps and 15 indoor caps. In 1995 she was selected to a team comprising the top 11 players in a pre-Olympic qualifying tournament. Professor Claire Penn was awarded South Africa’s Order of Mapungubwe in 2007 for her contribution to the field of speech and language pathology – especially in linguistics, sign language, child language and aphasia – and for groundbreaking research into the complexities of human communication. Business: Thabang Molefi Molefi’s next aim is to branch out into franchising in order to create more business and job opportunities. Besides the seven other centres she established in Gauteng, Kwazulu-Natal and the Free State, Molefi set up a mobile unit to visit communities in remote rural areas in the rest of the country. Roslyn Narain-Mohan, a teacher at the New West Secondary School in Durban, has become the “Mother Theresa” of her community, launching campaign after campaign to tackle virtually every form of social injustice affecting them. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Professor Sherylle Calder is a visual performance skills coach and world authority on the subject who has received back-to-back World Cup winners’ medals after training both the triumphant Springboks in 2007 and the English World Cup winners in 2003.center_img The winners in the seven categories – business, education, health, science and technology, social welfare, sport, and arts, culture and communications – each received R10 000 in prize money, while Buckland took home R30 000 as the overall winner. Health: Lorna Barbara Jacklin Professor Lorna Barbara Jacklin, principal consultant paediatrician at Wits University’s faculty of health sciences, has dedicated her life to improving the lives of children with mental health problems caused by physical disabilities or abuse. She combined her understanding of the value of the arts, particularly theatre, in the lives of all South Africans with her skills as a performer, director, fundraiser and administrator to direct these projects over a number of years. Today, the Roots Healthcare Centre business has branches in three South African provinces and a neighbouring country and boasts a multi-million rand turnover. Science and technology: Claire Penn Narain-Mohan’s community is a microcosm of a broader community affected by HIV/Aids, crime, racial conflict, poverty, age and individual suffering. Penn sees communication – a capacity which is complex, vulnerable and both a science and an art – as being at the heart of the human endeavour. For her, it can forge and sustain relationships but can equally be the main reason for breakdowns in understanding between individuals and communities. Social welfare: Veni Naidu Thabang Molefi is a qualified ethno-medical practitioner and beauty therapist who, with the little savings she had at the time, opened the first health spa in Soweto six years ago. The most notably project is Ubom! the Eastern Cape Drama Company, which was the first full-time professional drama company in the province. It brings theatre presentations and drama workshops to thousands of people in schools and communities all over the Eastern Cape. Sport: Sherylle Calder 8 August 2008 Untreated, mental health problems rob such children of a fair chance in life, translating into developmental and social problems as they grow into anti-social adults incapable of functioning independently. In her daily teaching and actions she encourages her pupils to seek solutions – which, for her, mean not just reaching out, but also identifying and understanding people’s real needs and the kind of support that would help people to help themselves in the long term. Arts, culture & communications (and overall winner) Naidu has received a doctorate for her groundbreaking research into the impact of HIV/Aids on businesses, families and communities. While most studies at the time focused on the medical aspects of HIV/Aids, Naidu investigated the economic and social impacts of the pandemic, completing the first study in South Africa on the impact HIV/Aids on income-earning urban households. Molefi’s pioneering centres introduced affordable health care to black communities through the use of the different but effective technique of iridology for diagnosis and herbs as prescribed medicines.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img12 April 2012 For 48-year-old Nokwanda Sotyantya, a member of a local recycling cooperative from the Imizamo Yethu informal settlement outside Cape Town, South Africa’s move towards a “green” economy has turned her life around. Sotyantya sits among heaps of garbage and patiently sorts through it, separating cardboard, plastic, glass, paper and metal, piece by piece. The recycled piles of trash are then weighed and sold to packaging manufacturers in South Africa that reuse the materials to create new products.Sotyantya belongs to the country’s first group of small business entrepreneurs who have benefited from the government’s move towards a green economy. It is a strategy aimed at creating environmental sustainability, social equity, and economic growth; the government wants to create 300 000 jobs within a decade in this sector.Previously unemployed and struggling to survive, Sotyantya says she now earns an average of R2 000 (US$250) a month from her work – enough to care for herself and her four children.“The more people become aware of the benefits of recycling, the more rubbish gets dropped off at the Hout Bay waste centre. For me, that translates into more money,” Sotyantya explains.Hout Bay Recycling Co-op, social incubator ThriveThe Hout Bay Recycling Co-op to which she belongs is based at the municipal waste drop-off site in Hout Bay. Here Sotyantya and other members of the cooperative sort and sell the recycled material.Her cooperative of six formerly jobless, poverty-stricken men and women currently recycles 25 tonnes of waste each month. And this number is slowly increasing.The cooperative received a boost when Thrive, a social enterprise incubator that helps green start-ups to become viable, competitive businesses, decided to help the cooperative improve its business strategy and management expertise.“We focus on creating jobs that help to minimise waste, increase renewable sources, protect and restore local biodiversity, reduce energy and water demands and create a local food network,” explains Thrive managing director Iming Lin.It is much more than developing traditional business models, she adds; it is about incorporating social, environmental and economic benefits.UN sustainable development awardAlthough it has only been operating since July 2011, Thrive’s work has not gone unnoticed. The SEED Initiative of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) acknowledged the organisation’s work by selecting it for one of its 2011 sustainable development awards that are annually presented to 35 African grassroots entrepreneurs in the green economy.“On this continent, companies and countries, from small communities to heads of state, are suddenly realising the importance of the green economy,” says UNEP spokesperson Nick Nuttall.Economic development and environmental and social sustainability cannot operate in isolation, he says.“Going green doesn’t mean it’s nice and fluffy. There are some hard economic figures behind it, too.” Creating a green economy is no longer an option, but a requirement, Nuttall says.“We are living in a world of seven-billion people increasing to over nine-billion by 2050. If we don’t change the way we consume goods and services and think about the environmental limits, then we’re in trouble.“But it’s a world of opportunity too,” Nuttal says, adding, “there are more and more examples of small businesses solving big problems and creating livelihoods.”Green Economic AccordIt is an opportunity that the South African government wants to seize over the next few years. In November, it signed a Green Economic Accord that stipulates active national investment in the green economy.“The green economy can create large numbers of jobs, provide a spur for industrialisation and help create a sustainable future for this and the next generations,” said Minister of Economic Development Ebrahim Patel after the accord was announced.The agreement is part of a plan to shift towards a lower carbon-intensity economy, while creating jobs and promoting industrial development.But government alone cannot manage and fund South Africa’s transition to a green economy, says Patel. The business sector, trade unions and civil society organisations must also play a role.That is why organisations like Thrive have started talking to and collaborating with different government departments, such as environmental affairs, trade and industry, solid waste or public works, to jointly develop ways of giving the local green economy a jolt.‘Social enterprises are a growing model’“Social enterprises are a growing model. We want to develop donor-independent, viable, scalable business models that link the economy and the environment and that can be rolled out in multiple communities or even nationally,” says Lin.“Government has been very supportive of what we’re doing.”Apart from supporting the recycling cooperative, Thrive is trying to get a number of other innovative green economy businesses off the ground.One of them is TrashBack, a bicycle recycling collection scheme that picks up re-usable material from restaurants, businesses and residential housing complexes, which are currently not serviced by the municipality. For every eight clients – or 4 800kg of garbage – TrashBack can create one full-time job, says Lin.“We want to show people how it all links into each other: waste, water, food, jobs and better livelihoods for all,” says Lin.“We can’t afford not to have a green economy.”Sapalast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgAbout 320 teachers in 150 schools in Mpumalanga, the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal have already received teaching and learning materials during LEAP’s pilot phaseRemote and rural schools are set to benefit from the Learn English Audio Project (LEAP) which aims to help pupils improve their English listening and speaking skills.Hand-picked schools will each receive a solar-powered MP3 player for use in a classroom or language club.The MP3 player comes loaded with over 40 hours of teaching material, teacher guides and lesson plans for Grades R to 4, a book with primary songs and stories, and a set of colourful cartoon story posters.The project, a British Council initiative, was launched by Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga in Johannesburg on Tuesday. The British Council is a global cultural exchange organisation.The minister explained that LEAP would assist with developing pupils’ literacy in any language. The children would also get used to hearing English spoken in various accents.“These [listening and speaking] skills become even more important in the acquisition of a second language such as English in the South African context, where English effectively becomes the medium of instruction from Grade 4 onwards,” said Motshekga.She added that LEAP had the potential to address these often neglected skills to help “embed the building blocks of early literacy”.Motshekga said she had personally struggled to understand English spoken by white people after completing her matric.“I relied on reading to pass my modules. I had to tune my hearing to understand the accent. Sometimes that is what accounts for the failure of many first year students at universities,” she said.About 320 teachers in 150 schools in Mpumalanga, the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal have already received teaching and learning materials during LEAP’s pilot phase.PRIORITISING LITERACYMotshekga said improving literacy skills was an important priority for the government.She said, “We believe that this project will also cover the tasks outlined for education in the National Development Plan, which talks to forming partnerships to improve education quality and outcomes.”She said the ministry had signed a declaration with the British Council in January this year.THE LEAP PROJECTThe teaching and learning audio material will not deviate from the current national curriculum, as it is linked to it, Motshekga said.“To complement the training package, teachers receive a training video, lesson plans and posters, and an extra SD card containing all the materials, so that they can access the materials on their cell phones, thus facilitating lesson planning at any time and location,” she added. Teachers will be trained to use the MP3 players effectively.The British Council country director for South Africa, Colm McGivern, said the council partnered with the department to promote quality education.“This is a long-term strategic partnership with the department. We signed a five-year partnership agreement, through which we aim to improve learning of all languages in South Africa.”He said the council has already received positive feedback from the project’s many beneficiaries.McGivern said monitoring and evaluation processes would be put in place for the council to measure the tangible benefits for teachers and pupils in time.“By the end of our five-year partnership, we will ensure that we help the Department of Basic Education train all 400 000 teachers in South Africa in the better use of the material to improve the learning of all languages in the country,” he said.About 7000 solar-powered MP3 players have been distributed into nine sub-Saharan countries, including South Africa, Nigeria, Rwanda, Mozambique, Sudan, Tanzania, South Sudan, Senegal and Ethiopia.From: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img4. Lens WhackingLens whacking is done by detaching the lens from the mount and then holding it close enough to allow the sensor to still gain an image. The result is very surreal and ethereal. Why process those camera effects in post when you can do them directly in-camera? Check out these 5 easy in-camera effects, courtesy of Film Riot.Not all visual effects are done in post-production. In fact, some really awesome (and easy to achieve) effects can be done directly in-camera. Here’s a quick video from Film Riot’s Ryan Connolly that explains how a few of the most eye-opening in-camera effects are done.Here are the in-camera effects that Connolly covered in the above video.1. Forced PerspectiveForced perspective is a technique that uses spacing and distance to make objects appear larger or smaller in relation to other objects. 2. Lower Shutter SpeedUsing a lower shutter speed is generally done for two reasons. The first: because the location is dark and you need to let in more light. The second is to create motion blur to make the action seem more fluid. 5. Lens FlareLens flare is the natural effect of non-image forming light entering the lens and hitting the sensor, creating the characteristic streak of light.Bonus: Here’s how JJ Abrams achieves his legendary lens flares.Want to see more filmmaking and video production quick tips? Check out the following posts here on PremiumBeat:Tips for Shooting Like an Editor9 Tips for Shooting in Cold Weather15 Tips for Shooting Dynamic Video InterviewsHave you shot any in-camera effects that you’d like to show off? Any secrets you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments below. 3. Faster Shutter SpeedA faster shutter speed is utilized extensively by professional sport filmmakers. Because of the high shutter speed, you can essentially “freeze” a moment. When using this in conjunction with camera movement, the action seemingly becomes more violent. This technique works great in combat sequences.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgAFP official booed out of forum NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Read Next LATEST STORIES Corpus Christi, Texas—For revered promoter Bob Arum, Jerwin Ancajas reaching the level of success Manny Pacquiao has attained will be too much to ask.Even then, however, the 86-year-old boxing Hall of Famer, believes Ancajas is destined for greatness like his idol and benefactor.“If he (Ancajas) will be able to achieve mini-half of what Manny has achieved, I’d be very happy,” said Arum, who has signed the International Boxing Federation champion to a six-fight contract under his Top Rank Promotions, on Friday.Ancajas caught Arum’s discerning eyes when he fought in the undercard of Pacquiao’s ill-fated defense of the World Boxing Organization welterweight crown in Brisbane, Australia, in July last year.That time, Ancajas stopped Japanese Teiru Kinoshita in the second defense of his 115-pound title.“He’s a really nice kid. Humble and kind just like Manny. And he could really fight.“His life story is somewhat epic like Manny and is dedicated as a fighter. He has the Manny pedigree.”If Ancajas wins impressively, Arum has grand plans for MP Promotions’ first world champion.Apart from more lucrative purses, Top Rank is bent on pitting him against the talent-laden division’s best like World Boxing Organization king Naoya Inoue of Japan and World Boxing Council titlist Srisaket Sor Runvisai of Thailand.ADVERTISEMENT Jaja wants more from self, NU after opening day win over Adamson Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony PLAY LIST 00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises View commentslast_img read more

READ MORE