October 15, 2019
  • 3:54 am Manitobas DauphinSwan RiverMarquette riding in the spotlight
  • 3:53 am Suzuki visits the Cree
  • 3:52 am Court order puts survivor compensation cases in jeopardy
  • 3:42 am CN Rail trying to shut up former supervisor for giving financial documents
  • 3:36 am Churches calling for prayer and support ahead of TRC closing event in

CALGARY — Enbridge Inc. announced a deal Monday to transfer $1.76 billion in pipeline assets to one of its affiliates.The deal with Enbridge Income Fund includes its 50 per cent interest in the U.S. segment of the Alliance pipeline, which carries gas from northeastern British Columbia and northwestern Alberta to the Chicago area, as well as the Southern Lights diluent pipeline, which transports the oilsands-thinning agent from the Chicago area to Edmonton.Enbridge chief financial officer Richard Bird said this latest “drop down” deal will provide a “significant source of low-cost funding for our record growth capital program.”After the transfer, Enbridge’s overall economic interest in the income fund will be 66.4 per cent, through direct and indirect investments.“We believe that the acquisition of the U.S. segment of the Alliance pipeline and the cash flows from the Southern Lights pipeline will be a great fit for the fund and is expected to deliver numerous benefits,” said fund president Perry Schuldhaus.“The assets will substantially scale up and further diversify the fund’s sources of low risk cash flow.” read more

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Junior outside hitter Michael Henchy (6) celebrates a point during a match against Ball State Feb. 26 at St. John Arena. OSU lost, 3-1.Credit: Kathleen Martini / Oller reporterThe men’s volleyball season is quickly winding down and Ohio State is looking to pick up as many wins as it can.With just three regular season contests left on the schedule, the Buckeyes are set to take on No. 14 Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Friday at St. John Arena.The Mastodons (17-6, 6-5) are scheduled to travel from Fort Wayne, Ind., to take on the Buckeyes (10-13, 6-6) on their home court this time around. The two teams faced off earlier in the season in Indiana, and the match ended in a 3-2 loss for the Buckeyes, March 5.“We lost a tight one in the last meeting, so we’re looking for some revenge in our gym,” junior outside hitter Michael Henchy said.Junior middle blocker Dustan Neary said the unranked Buckeyes are expecting yet another tough matchup against the Mastadons, but focusing on their opponent’s strengths should help tip the scales in OSU’s favor.“We expect them to be aggressive from the pins and from the end line, Neary said. “We need to key in on their go-to players and make sure we have a block in front of them.”Henchy said IPFW features a very strong offense, and OSU needs to do everything it can to make sure the Mastadons are forced to play back on their heels and on the defensive.“They have some really good hitters on their team that we’re looking to slow down,” Henchy said. “If we can prevent them from having a big game, then our chances of winning go up significantly. We want to serve them out of system and attack the balls they give up so they are playing more defense than offense.”Redshirt-junior opposite Andrew Lutz said the team’s preparations have been focused on IPFW’s offense, working to adjust the Buckeyes’ defensive approach to thwart its style of play.“We need to be good with our first contacts on defense. Once we do this, it’s going to be essential that we’re able to generate attacks to win some points,” Lutz said.Henchy said he expects the match to be intense because each game down the stretch plays big into seeding for the MIVA conference tournament.“I expect lots of energy from them because we are the Ohio State volleyball team and they are fighting for a better seed for the conference tournament,” Henchy said. “We will win if we play our style of game and outwork them on defense.”The match is set to start at 7 p.m. Friday. read more

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Time travellers are welcome to attend Stephen Hawking’s memorial service next month. An online ballot to attend the service requires applicants give their date of birth, which can be any day up to December 31, 2038.So far all applicants live in the present, according to the Stephen Hawking Foundation, but the door remains open to voyagers in a fourth dimension.A spokesman said: “We cannot exclude the possibility of time travel as it has not been disproven to our satisfaction. “All things are possible until proven otherwise.”But so far we have had applications from all round the world, and we do mean round – there are no flat-Earthers here.”The flexible policy suggests the professor undertook his own journey on the subject – over time. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Professor Hawking’s funeral was held on March 31 in Cambridge. His memorial service will take place on June 15 at Westminster Abbey, where his ashes will be interred between sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin.The ballot for the 1,000 tickets available to the public can be found at stephenhawkinginterment.com and closes at midnight on Tuesday. The coffin of Stephen Hawking arrives at the Church of St Mary the Great, Cambridge After no-one attended the party, the professor remarked it was “experimental evidence that time travel is not possible”. In a 1992 essay entitled Space and Time Warps, Professor Hawking postulated that it might be possible to warp spacetime sufficiently to travel in time as well as space, but only into the future, not the past.He wrote: “This picture would explain why we haven’t been overrun by tourists from the future.”But in June 2009 he optimistically held a “time traveller party” for which invitations were only sent out after the event. The coffin of Stephen Hawking arrives at the Church of St Mary the Great, CambridgeCredit:Charlie Forgham-Bailey read more

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first_imgGreg Evans, Executive Director – Coal, Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) says “growth in key Asian markets for high-quality Australian coal will continue to underpin our coal exports with increasing demand forecast over the medium term, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency (IEA).”The IEA’s Coal 2017 Report – which predicts demand to 2022 – says higher consumption in India, South-East Asia and other Asian countries (excluding China) is expected to more than offset lower demand in North America and Europe and flat demand from China. The report shows Australia is expected to remain the largest coal exporter in the world, with a clear lead in metallurgical coal and an increasing share of thermal coal exports.Export growth is attributed to Australia being an efficient coal producer that is well-positioned to deliver to growing Asian markets.“Australia’s high-quality coal is also in demand because of its suitability for new generation High Efficiency, Low Emissions (HELE) coal-fired power plants and steel making facilities located in Asia.“Australia is forecast to export 198 Mt coal equivalent (Mtce) of metallurgical coal in 2022, dominating the market with a trading share of 72%. Thermal coal exports are projected to increase by an average of 1% annually, to 187 Mtce by 2022 (from 177 Mtce in 2016).“Out to 2040, the IEA has forecast Australia’s share of the international coal trade is expected to increase from 34% in 2016 to 42%.”Global coal demand is forecast to increase 3.2% to 5,534 Mtce between now and 2022.Australia’s coal export markets of Japan, Korea and Taiwan remain stable, with thermal coal demand driven by existing and planned new modern coal-fired generation capacity.The biggest absolute demand growth comes from India, where demand is expected to increase by 135 Mtce over the next four years because of growth in coal-fired generation in parallel with expected growth in renewable energy.With imports from Indonesia expected to decrease, the Indian market still represents a growing opportunity for high-quality Australian coal. ASEAN and other developing countries – Indonesia, Pakistan, Vietnam, Malaysia and the Philippines – are projected to have the strongest relative demand growth at 5.9% a year, again driven by increased coal-fired generation.“These growing markets are already significant for Australian coal exporters, with trade to the South-East Asian markets of Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines valued at A$1.7 billion in 2016-17.last_img read more

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first_imgTHE RECENT VISIT of Judge Judy to Ireland raised the issue of television courtroom broadcasting and some related issues. During her engagements, she promoted the idea of such broadcasting here.A recent (non-scientific) poll in TheJournal.ie found that 46 per cent of voters (1,455) felt that cameras should not be allowed in Irish courtrooms, while 37 per cent voted yes and 16 per cent did not know. This author’s research has also found that a majority of responding Irish judges are not in favour of courtroom broadcasting.What Judge Judy does not say, however, is that there is clear and distinct lack of research in relation to the effects inside of the courtroom – such as distraction – and the effects outside of the courtroom. Effects can be positive and negative. In the instance of courtroom broadcasting research, there is an insufficient body of research to back up the various arguments. This includes the argument that one would expect Judge Judy to make, such as television courtroom broadcasting being educational or informative.The “educational” effects of television courtroom broadcastingIndeed, advocates of television courtroom broadcasting can be discerned to be using the “educational” argument less and less, and the distinctly more woolly “informative” argument more and more. One could wonder why? Possibly, it may be because no one has been able to back up the educational effects argument with valid research.A further point missing in the majority of the discussion is that there is no one single form of television courtroom broadcasting; there are many forms. There can also be different effects for different forms of television courtroom broadcasting. Form A may be more or less educational, for example, than Form B. Most commentators, including Judge Judy, refrain from discussing the many important nuances involved in the different types and different effects of television courtroom broadcasting. This is unfortunate, as it leaves consumers, interested parties, and judges in a less than fully informed position.One of the examinations of the actual forms involved the entertainment of “reality” form of courtroom television broadcasting is the show Judge Judy.Court trials and arbitration hearingsThe Judge Judy show presents genuine small-claims disputes, Judge Judith Sheindlin (a retired Manhattan Family Court Judge) acts as an arbitrator, not a judge, and the proceedings are therefore meant to be arbitration hearings rather than court trials. Steven Kohn in ‘I’m Not a Judge But I Play One on TV: American Reality Based Courtroom Television’ (2004) found that even though Judge Judy cases were not real, many participants mistakenly believed that they were.Kohn contrasts this reality TV cases with “real” cases and real courts; and the combatative and more “creative nature of justice that characterised Judy’s style” of reality TV cases. She adopts a style and “extra-legal approach that evoke the daytime TV talk show approach to family problems.” He asks “to what extent do viewers regard what they are witnessing to be real, and to what extent might this shape viewers’ understanding of their own relationship to the law and the legal system?” Elsewhere he refers to Judy’s “creative editing” and other production effects.Complaints about Judge Judy have reportedlu been made to the California Commission on Judicial Performance. Kohn writes that “any litigants who have appeared on judge Judy really believed that they were taking part in real courtroom proceedings. However, many might be shocked to learn that reality-based courtroom TV tribunals are not real courtroom proceedings at all and that government commissions cannot help them, nor can litigants appeal the decision of TV judges.”Judgement as a source of spectacleKohm’s research found that upon examination, Judge Judy “contribute[s] to a reconceptualisation of judgement as a source of spectacle and entertainment … increasing use of judgement as a form of entertainment.” Indeed, one of the comparators of the differing forms of television courtroom broadcasting involved comparing when and where the footage may be made available. Daytime viewers will generally be more familiar with Judge Judy.Interestingly, an officially commissioned New Zealand study found that most judges were distracted by the television cameras. It also found that 58 per cent of the public would be less willing to testify as witnesses if there was television courtroom broadcasting. Sixty-seven per cent of the public felt that the broadcasting experiment was not educational.The issue of education was also referred to in an official New York experiment (1997), yet no educational effects were shown to accrue. Researcher William Petkanas found that “confidence” did not increase as a result of television courtroom broadcasting (Cameras on Trial: An Assessment of the Educational Affect of News Cameras in Trial Courts). Steven Kohm, referred to above, found that television courtroom broadcasting was used for entertainment programming. Similarly so in the research of C Danielle Vinson and John S Ertter (Entertainment or Education, How Do Media Cover the Courts?). Theresa Keller (in Virginian research) found that television courtroom broadcasting did not increase the number of legal and court stories broadcast.The representation of defendantsRoberta Enter found that the television courtroom broadcasting she examined was biased and presented the defendant unfairly; entertainment and excitement instead were emphasised (The Image of the Judiciary: A Semiotic Analyse of Broadcast Trials to Ascertain its Definition of the Court System).So while Judge Judy and her headline promotion of television courtroom broadcasting is interesting, it conveniently ignores the nuances and the lack of research of different forms, and the arguments for and against one form over another form. It also ignores that her “courtroom” is not real. It is meant to entertain.Paul Lambert, solicitor and author of just published Data Protection Law in Ireland: Sources and Issues (Clarus Press) and Television Courtroom Broadcasting: Distraction Effects and Eye Tracking (Intellect UK).Column: Decisions in the family courts will be open to scrutiny now the veil has been lifted>Column: Judges and ministers public spat will achieve nothing, but reform is needed>last_img read more

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first_imgISRAELI WARPLANES POUNDED targets in the Gaza Strip as a major campaign to stop volleys of Palestinian rocket fire entered its second day, leaving 28 people dead and more than 100 wounded.A strike on a home in Beit Hanoun, in northern Gaza, claimed the lives of a commander of the Al-Quds Brigades, the armed wing of Islamic Jihad, his parents, a woman and two children, emergency services spokesman Ashraf al-Qudra said.Another strike early today on the southern city of Rafah killed a young man.The deaths brought to 28 the number of fatalities since the launch of Israel’s Operation Protective Edge early on Tuesday, with the Jewish state not ruling out a ground operation to stop the rocket attacks.Israeli air strikes took the lives of 24 people while four Hamas militants were killed staging a beachfront assault on an army base just north of the besieged Strip.During the day Israel staged multiple air strikes on the Gaza Strip, which also left more than 100 wounded, and militants from the Islamist movement Hamas hit back with rocket fire on Israel’s major population centres in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv in the most serious flare-up over Gaza since November 2012.As sirens wailed across the Holy City, three loud explosions were heard and a series of flashes lit the sky to the southwest. An Israeli soldier covers his head with a camouflage net protect from mosquitos at a gathering area near Israel Gaza Border. Source: Ariel SchalitPolice said one rocket fell in the vicinity of Ramat Raziel, some 10 kilometres (six miles) from the city’s southwestern flank and two more fell in outlying areas, without elaborating.Police spokeswoman Luba Samri said there were no reports of injuries anywhere in the Jerusalem area.The Ezzedine al-Qassam Brigades, the armed wing of Hamas, said it had fired four M75 rockets at Jerusalem, which lies 65 kilometres from the Palestinian enclave.It also claimed to have launched a rocket at Haifa, 165 kilometres away.There was no report of anything hitting the northern port city but the army said a rocket did fall on Hadera, 100 kilometres north of Gaza. Palestinians search the wreckage of vehicle following an Israeli air strike on it at the main road in Gaza City. Source: AP/Press Association ImagesHamas militants also said Tuesday they fired four rockets at Tel Aviv, 60 kilometres north of Gaza, setting sirens off across the city. Earlier, another rocket aimed at Israel’s commercial capital was shot down by the Iron Dome anti-missile defence system.Israeli authorities said that public bomb shelters in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem had been readied for use.Abbas calls for international supportPalestinian president Mahmud Abbas has demanded Israel “immediately stop” its air campaign and called on the international community to pressure the Jewish state.“The Palestinian Authority will go to all international organisations to seek protection for the Palestinian people,” he said in a televised statement.In Tuesday’s worst strike, a missile slammed into a house in the southern Gaza city of Khan Yunis killing eight people and wounding 25, emergency services spokesman Ashraf al-Qudra said.Witnesses said an Israeli drone fired a warning flare, prompting relatives and neighbours to gather at the house as a human shield. But an F-16 warplane fired a missile at the building, levelling it.Hamas denounced the attack as “a horrendous war crime” and vowed retaliation against “all Israelis”.In addition, Israeli troops killed four Hamas militants who reached the Israeli coastline by sea and tried to attack an army base near Zikim.“A number of terrorists came out of the ocean and attacked… with Kalashnikov rifles and hand grenades,” said Lieutenant Colonel Peter Lerner, who said they were all killed.The attack was claimed by the Qassam Brigades.- © AFP, 2014Read: Women and children among injured as Israel launches “Operation Protective Edge” >Read: Israel approves call-up of 40,000 reservists for potential Gaza assaultlast_img read more

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first_img Luke Fitzgerald You scored out of ! Nigel Owens and Romain Poite will take charge of the Champions Cup semi-finals‘You’d either laugh or cry and I didn’t want to cry in front of 80,000 people. I couldn’t believe it’ Tweet 2 Tweet Share http://the42.ie/3341213 Tony O’Reilly JJ Williams Neil Jenkins Share your result: Lion Hearts Who is the Lions’ all-time leading try scorer? Tana Umaga AMI Stadium, Christchurch Mane Men Ronan O’Gara Owen Farrell Apr 17th 2017, 5:00 PM Ieuan Evans Neil Jenkins Jim Telfer Westpac Stadium, Wellington Simon Zebo Martin Johnson Eden Park, Auckland Will Greenwood Bolter 0 Warren Gatland You scored out of ! Who was the head coach in 2005, the last time the Lions toured New Zealand? By Adrian Russell 3 And where will the first test with the All Blacks this year be held? center_img Shane Williams Clive Woodward Share Short URL The Power of Four Not bad – you may be selected for the tour yet An anthem was commissioned for the 2005 tour – what was it called? Good tourist Monday 17 Apr 2017, 5:00 PM Four Red Fields Forsyth Barr Stadium, Dunedin 33,948 Views Share Charlie Hodgson Ian McGeechan You certainly know your Lions history. You deserve a seat on that plane. Share your result: Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Who was the last player to be selected for the Lions before winning an international cap? Answer all the questions to see your result! You spear tackled those answers into the ground head first. Well done. How well do you know your Lions history? The touring squad is announced this week. 1 The Lions have played 11 series against New Zealand. How many have they won? Tweet 20 Comments Jonny Wilkinson Keith Wood ‘Here comes the judge, here comes the judge. Yeah, yeah, here comes the judge’. Who presided over the famous 1997 kangaroo court? Which of these out halves wasn’t on the 2001 tour? Share Tweet Email2 You scored out of ! Share your result: Brian O’Driscoll last_img read more

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first_img71% des Français pratiquent l’automédicationFrance – D’après un sondage réalisé par l’Institut d’études marketing GfK HealthCare, les trois-quarts des Français soignent leurs maladies courantes par automédication pour des raisons pratiques, ou par simple habitude.Les Français semblent vouloir se simplifier l’existence, même dans un domaine aussi sérieux que leur santé. C’est pourquoi 71% d’entre eux n’attendent pas l’avis d’un médecin pour prendre des médicaments. 57% le font pour des raisons pratiques, et 44% par habitude.Ils seraient même 63% à ne pas voir d’inconvénient quant à la mise en place d’un système d’automédication grâce à des distributeurs automatiques.”Les consommateurs français de produits d’automédication se responsabilisent, ils s’orientent progressivement vers un comportement dans lequel ils sauront s’adresser à l’expertise du pharmacien pour obtenir un conseil sur des problématiques de santé spécifiques, et s’orienter vers les circuits de distribution grand public pour les problématiques de santé courante”, explique Eric Robillard, directeur France de la division HealthCare du groupe GfK.D’après ce sondage, les produits génériques semblent plutôt appréciés des Français. C’est ainsi que chez les plus de 25 ans, 77% achètent ce type de produits de santé. Ils sont d’ailleurs sollicités dans plus d’un cas sur deux par le pharmacien.Le sondage, qui visait à connaître les habitudes de consommation en matière de produits de santé chez les Français, ainsi que leur vision de l’industrie pharmaceutique, révèle également qu’ils connaissent mal ce domaine. Seuls huit noms de laboratoires pharmaceutiques ont pu être cités par les personnes interrogées. 25% d’entre elles ont fait mention de Boiron et 18% de Sanofi-Aventis, tandis que Biogaran fait l’objet de la plus grande notoriété (63%).Les Français voient cependant les laboratoires pharmaceutiques comme des industrie de profits et de pouvoir, qui détiennent une influence sur le corps médical, les politiques et les médias.Le 13 avril 2010 à 11:36 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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first_img Take two trips around the Earth — in 15 minutes. European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut and International Space Station (ISS) commander Alexander Gerst recently captured the longest continuous timelapse from space.The glorious shot travels from Tunisia across Beijing and through Australia in two trips around the planet, showing the Earth pass from day to night twice. You can also see the Station travel across swaths of ocean and over brilliantly lit cities. There are also clouds, thunderstorms, and flashes from lightning storms.The time-lapse shot is comprised of approximately 21,375 images of Earth all captured by Gerst from the International Space Station to celebrate 20 years of the ISS and international collaboration and research. The 15-minute clip has been sped up to 12.5 times faster than the actual velocity of the observatory.A map at the top-right corner of the screen shows the location of the Station during the journey.More on Geek.com:63 Incredible Images of Earth from Space40 Images of the Surface of MarsNASA Releases First 8K Footage From Space (And It’s Really Cool) NASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This WeekendHubble Captures Saturn’s ‘Phonograph Record’ Ring System Stay on targetlast_img read more

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first_img Updated: 10:19 AM KUSI Newsroom, Posted: April 17, 2019 MTS unveils new trolley car designs at open house 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A group of Metropolitan Transit System officials will hold an open house today to showcase the agency’s new trolley cars, which are scheduled to enter service Saturday.The new cars include multiple new quality-of-life features like vinyl seating, improved sightlines for security and easier access to equipment for the agency’s technicians. The cars also have a redesigned mid-section to improve the flow of trolley passengers.MTS ordered a total of 45 new trolley cars in 2016 from German manufacturer Siemens and received the first one last August.The agency expects to receive the rest of the new fleet by next year. Nine of the cars will be added to MTS’ Blue, Green and Orange trolley lines while the other 36 will operate along the 11-mile Mid-Coast Blue Line trolley extension, which is scheduled to be completed in 2021.“These vehicles represent the true partnership that exists between MTS and Siemens,” MTS CEO Paul Jablonski said when the agency received the first new car. “We worked closely over the last two years to ensure that these vehicles meet the needs of our system, and our riders, once Mid-Coast becomes operational.”center_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter April 17, 2019 KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

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first_imgThis year, workers finished restoring a fish habitat near Salmon Creek in Pleasant Valley Park north of Vancouver.Now comes the true test.Two local nonprofits and volunteers on Monday introduced about 300 young coho salmon into the new habitat, a spring-fed pond built with logs and debris to provide shelter to growing fish. Many will likely linger there until it’s time to make the journey to the Pacific Ocean. Gravel at the bottom of the pond and nearby channel offers what organizers hope becomes spawning ground for returning adult salmon.“Everybody just talks about fish,” said Clark County Commissioner Marc Boldt. “But it’s great to see something happening.”Monday’s fish release highlighted the two organizations that made the project happen: The Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group — which built the habitat this year — and Northwest Wild Fish Rescue — which supplied the young fish, plucked from other parts of the Salmon Creek watershed unsuitable for survival. Dave Brown, who runs Northwest Wild Fish Rescue, first found the natural spring that now feeds the pond and channel connected to it.Tony Meyer, executive director of the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group, said the new habitat offers a crucial respite for fish living and growing in the Salmon Creek basin. The spring-fed channel next to the pond stays close to an ideal 56 degrees year-round, he said. Parts of Salmon Creek itself, by contrast, can rise to well above 80 degrees during the summer months.“And that’s just instant death (for fish),” Meyer said.Boldt was among the dozen or so volunteers who helped place the salmon, bucket by bucket, into their new home on a gray Monday. State and local agencies were also represented. Paul Matson simply came as an interested neighbor who lives in the area.“I walked up, and they handed me a bucket,” Matson said.While digging out the new pond, workers found the remnants of an old habitat constructed there, Meyer said, likely destroyed by the 1996 flood. Most recently, the area was simply an open meadow before the project harnessed the spring into a defined channel, he said.last_img read more

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first_imgJOHANNESBURG — South Africa’s government was confronted Friday with a new and chilling allegation about the bogus sign language interpreter at Nelson Mandela’s memorial: He was reportedly accused of murder 10 years ago.Officials said they were investigating the revelation by the national eNCA TV news station. But they were unable, or unwilling, to explain why a man who says he is schizophrenic with violent tendencies was allowed to get within arm’s length of President Barack Obama and other world leaders.Investigators probing Thamsanqa Jantjie “will compile a comprehensive report,” said Phumla Williams, the top government spokeswoman. But she did not say how long the investigation would take and insisted details would not be released until it was completed.“We are not going to sweep it under the carpet,” Williams said. “We want to own up if there is a mistake, but we don’t want to be dishonest” to Jantjie.An Associated Press reporter found Jantjie at a makeshift bar owned by his cousin on the outskirts of Soweto Friday, near his concrete house close to shacks and an illegal dump where goats pick at grass between the trash. Asked about the murder allegation, Jantjie turned and walked away without saying anything.last_img read more

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first_imgThe government has launched a consultation on early exit charges surrounding the pension freedoms that came into effect in April.The consultation will examine whether exit charges should be capped for those aged over 55 years that are planning to withdraw money from their pension pots.It will also look at how greater clarity can be provided around the circumstances in which someone should seek financial advice, and investigate how the process of transferring between pension schemes can be improved.  The consultation will be open for 12 weeks and will be accompanied by an online survey. A response will be published in the autumn. Margaret Snowdon, director at JLT Employee Benefits, said: “It was with great fanfare that the Chancellor announced the freedom of choice reforms last year, but the road to implementation has been riddled with hurdles.“Although those over 55 can now legally access their pensions as a lump sum, and some 85,000 have already done so, the penalty fees of as much as 20% will have seriously dented many pots and undoubtedly have prevented many more from taking advantage of the reforms.“While the exact amount of money required to fund a comfortable retirement will always be subject to the vagaries of life expectancy, what is clear is that pensioners will need every penny that they are entitled to if we, as a country, are to avoid widespread penury within our pensioner community in future.”Having said that, there are certain administrative and other costs that do need to be considered and a cap on fees of 2.5% would be a good starting point towards a fair and effective system. We welcome the government’s consultation.”Richard Lloyd, executive director at Which?, added: “If the pension reforms are to be a genuine success, the government must take action to make sure everyone who wants to take advantage of the freedoms can.”People should be able to switch without being stung by excessive exit fees if their provider doesn’t offer the full flexibilities.”The government should also consider what other reforms are needed to further protect savers, including a charge cap on default drawdown products.”last_img read more

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first_imgFORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. (WSVN) – Holocaust survivors and the school superintendents from Broward and Miami-Dade counties came together to reflect and reward, Sunday morning, and one of the honorees included a teacher at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.Broward Public Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie presented Ivy Schamis, the Parkland school’s Holocaust education teacher, with a check at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale.Schamis’ classroom is in the freshman building where the mass shooting took place, and she has not been able to get back to that classroom since the Feb. 14 massacre.Six Holocaust survivors joined Runcie and Miami-Dade Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho to also honor the 12 middle and high school students who were the winners of the Fourth Annual Holocaust Reflection Contest.Julius Eisenstein, one of the survivors who told their stories, said it is of utmost importance to preserve their legacy. “I am 98 years old, and I always wonder, what’s going to happen after we go?” he said. “Please, please, I’m talking to the world. Do not forget us.”Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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first_imgBalanagar: Medchal district BJP president Madhavaram Kantha Rao on Sunday conducted the party membership campaign in Indranagar of Balanagar division. Speaking at the launch, Rao asserted that people of all sections were able to get the benefit of welfare schemes being taken up by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the last five years. He claimed that the Union government was strengthening the country’s security and financial set-up leading to the all-round development of the nation. People attracted by Mody’s administration were keen to take up BJP membership, he observed. Those present during the campaign included G Srikar Rao, Harish Reddy, Srinivas Reddy, Ravi Goud, and BJYM leaders.last_img

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first_imgWe were supposed to go into a deep depression following the shock Brexit vote, werent we? And the UK economy was forecast to go into a tailspin as we all stopped spending? That was the conventional wisdom, at least.So what happened? Why are we not all hoarding tins of baked beans and hunkering down for the post-vote apocalypse? Instead, it would seem that we continue to spend money with abandon, judging by Julys retail sales numbers, which showed the strongest growth since end-2014 (Chart 1).Surprising economic news doesnt end thereIf this were the only statistic showing surprising resilience in the UK economy, then we could perhaps dismiss it as a rogue statistic, a bizarre anomaly that would soon be corrected in subsequent months.But no: there are other signs that economic activity post-EU referendum remains solid. The number of people claiming unemployment benefit also surprisingly fell in July, by more than 8,000 claimants, after 4 months of rising claim counts (Chart 2).Remember too that Mark Carney, the Bank of Englands governor, did his bit this month to support the local economy in cutting the Bank of Englands base rate by 0.25%. This should cut the average lifetime tracker mortgage rate in the UK to around 2.3% going forwards. Note too how fixed rates have also continued to fall, with the average 3-year fixed mortgage rate for a 75% loan-to-value mortgage falling to just 2.1% as of July (Chart 3).Four domestic UK stocks for value-hungry investorsWith all the post-vote pessimism hurting a whole range of companies in the domestically-sensitive Retail, Housebuilding and Leisure sectors, there is still value to be had even after the recent stock market rally back.Here are four companies that I think can rebound further should the UK economy hold up in the months ahead.Retail: Debenhams and DFS FurnitureThe unseasonably hot month of July has boosted clothing demand, and as we approach autumn we will likely be back in stores buying warmer clothing and boots in the months ahead.The department store group Debenhams (code: DEB) has good potential to benefit from these clothing trends, and represents good value at the moment. One should not forget its strong online presence (debenhams.com), so it should also be helped by the stronger growth of online retail in clothing and footwear (think of the strong growth from Asos and BooHoo).What particularly appeals to me about Debenhams is the attractive income potential: it pays out a 5.9% dividend yield annually, which is a very nice earner in todays near zero-rate environment.DFS Furniture (code DFS): DFS was particularly optimistic in its August 11 trading update: sales in the second half of its financial year grew 7% over the previous year, and they expect a record performance for the full year. Little impact from the Brexit vote expected, then…If we are all going to stay more at home given the unfavourable tourist exchange rates post-vote, then we may engage in more nesting behaviour, helping sales of sofas and other furniture.Leisure: Restaurant GroupRestaurant Group (code: RTN) has suffered since the beginning of this year as trading at their restaurant chains Frankie and Bennys, Chiquito and Coast to Coast weakened, driving shares from nearly 700p to just 422p today.This month, the company ousted the former CEO on the back of this poor trading performance and has installed a new chief executive, who is leading a review of the companys whole growth strategy. Should UK consumers decide to spend more at home rather than go abroad, then Restaurant Group could see a further rebound in its fortunes.Housebuilders: Taylor WimpeyHousebuilders have been firmly out of favour since June 23s plebiscite, with todays share prices around 20% lower than back then.Taylor Wimpey (code: TW) is well-positioned to take advantage of any resilience in new home sales thanks to lower mortgage rates on the back of the Bank of Englands rate cut.Results this year should be strong given the house price rises seen so far this year and the strong volumes of new homes sold, while investors are handsomely rewarded with an 8% annual income yield from Taylor Wimpeys dividend payouts.last_img read more

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first_img The world of Jason Bourne is expanding: Treadstone, a new spinoff series focused on the famous spy franchise, is coming to USA Network soon.On Friday, USA Network released the first teaser for Treadstone on YouTube, which promises a lot of action, undercover missions, and car chases. There aren’t many details on the plot of the TV series, however, The Verge noted that it could be expanding on events from The Bourne Identity and it highlights a squad of sleeper agents who can easily win a fight, however, they can’t recall any of their training.In the teaser, trouble arises when someone starts waking these agents up, causing them to have violent outbursts. There are shots of these agents lying down on cold tundras, crawling across buildings on tight wires, and smashing glass mirrors.“These Cicadas have very different trajectories upon finding themselves ‘awakened’ over a decade after volunteering for a black-ops program of which they have no memory. Their ordinary cover lives, which they believed to be real, are thrown into chaos when they are activated to perform deadly missions,” Treadstone executive producer Ben Smith told Entertainment Weekly in an interview. “Their journey will take viewers on a thrilling ride as they uncover the truth.”The next generation of assassins has been activated. From the world of Jason Bourne comes the series #Treadstone, this fall on @USA_Network. pic.twitter.com/KsPRMHcuyN— Treadstone (@treadstone) July 22, 2019Treadstone, which stars Han Hyo-Joo, Jeremy Irvine, and Emilia Schüle, will debut on USA Network in October.More on Geek.com:How AMC’s ‘The Terror’ Uses American History to Deliver Horror‘Spider-Verse’ Creators Plan Sony Marvel TV ShowsDisney+ Gets Fox Movie Remakes, Hulu/ESPN Bundle Syfy Axes ‘Krypton’ Superhero Series After 2 SeasonsWhat to Stream on Amazon Prime This Weekend Stay on targetlast_img read more

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first_img Make Your Own ‘Watch Dogs Legion’ Music With Ubisoft and JGL’s New GriftHere’s the Heartwarming Reason Why ‘Just Dance’ Is Still on Wii Stay on target No matter how you pronounce its name, we can all agree that Ubisoft is one of the most prolific AAA video game publishers these days. While rivals like Activision and EA seem to narrow their focus on and a handful of hits, the French video game empire has a relatively wider portfolio. However, that doesn’t mean Ubisoft is above milking the same few cash cows, and thanks to a recent fiscal year earnings report, we now know which virtual teats are about to be squeezed yet again.Ubisoft confirmed that new installments in the Assassin’s Creed, Far Cry, The Crew, and South Park franchises will all be released before the end of the next fiscal year. We already knew about South Park: The Fractured But Whole, the delayed South Park RPG sequel. However, the rest of these games are theoretically games that have yet to be revealed.We say theoretically because numerous pre-E3 leaks have already told us much of what to expect from the future of these franchises. After a taking a year off to give the awful Michael Fassbender movie time to shine, this year’s Assassin’s Creed will almost surely be an even more free-form open-world adventure set in Ancient Egypt or something featuring the return of naval combat called Assassin’s Creed: Origins, or Empire.The Far Cry rumors sound slightly more interesting. Previously the series was known for its exotic and dangerous locales like Southeast Asia and tropical islands. Vacations gone wrong. However, Far Cry 5 might hit closer to home. We’ve heard the game has players battling against militia gun nut, Duck Dynasty types in Montana. Given America’s current political climate, that should wake a few folks up. And I guess redneck brutes aren’t too much of a stretch from the literal caveman enemies of 2016’s Far Cry: Primal.Finally, for some reason Ubisoft is making a sequel to The Crew, its already forgotten 2014 open-world racing game that wasn’t Need for Speed or Burnout or Forza Horizon. At least it wasn’t Driveclub. By all means get hyped for this if you can.So look forward to another year of hot Ubisoft releases, competent but mechanical open-worlds that keep blending together as the company desperately attempts to avoid a Vivendi takeover. I just hope the Mario/Rabbids RPG turns out alright. Good luck!last_img read more

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first_img IBA Offers Compact Proteus One Proton SystemVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:26Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:26 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  At ASTRO 2012, IBA featured a scale model install of its Proteus One compact proton system combined with the Philips Ambient Experience, designed to count patients through lighting visual effects. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Recent Videos View all 606 items Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Sponsored Content | Videos | Proton Therapy | November 20, 2012 IBA Offers Compact Proteus One Proton System RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Technology Reports View all 9 items Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health View all 62 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA.last_img read more

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first_img Posted by Tags: Travel Leaders Network, Vacation.com NEW YORK — Vacation.com and sister companies Travel Leaders Associates and Results! Travel are consolidating to form one organization – Travel Leaders Network – with close to 7,000 locations in the U.S. and Canada.The group will include both franchise (Associate) and consortium (Member) affiliations and will be headed up by President Roger E. Block, CTC, formerly President of Travel Leaders Franchise Group. Block will report to John Lovell, CTC, President of Travel Leaders Network and Leisure Group.The move makes Travel Leaders Network the largest seller of luxury travel, cruises, river cruises and tours in the travel agency industry, comprised of more than one-third of North America’s leading travel agencies. The group has a combined annual sales volume of more than US$17 billion.All of the participating agencies that previously belonged to either Travel Leaders Franchise Group (Travel Leaders Associates and Results! Travel) or Vacation.com will continue to be Members within Travel Leaders Network.Existing Travel Leaders Associates will retain sole licensing rights for the exclusive use of the Travel Leaders brand name. All Members of both Results! Travel and Vacation.com will automatically become Members of Travel Leaders Network, while qualifying Members will be provided the option of becoming Travel Leaders Associates “to enjoy a heightened level of offerings”.“We have long been recognized as a world-class organization, offering the industry’s most innovative and honored travel agency solutions. But as our industry’s landscape continues to evolve and consolidate, so must we. Simply put, we must come together to create one powerful force that helps each of our agencies compete even more effectively for the hearts and minds of the traveling public,” said Lovell. “Our focus must be on delivering an even greater return on our agency constituents’ ever-changing needs. Rather than competing with each other, we must remove the barriers behind the scenes within our three businesses so the agencies we serve can more effectively compete both within and beyond the traditional travel agency space. As we further sharpen our focus and value proposition, we’re removing any prevailing brand confusion about who we are within the marketplace.”More news:  Transat calls Groupe Mach’s latest offer “highly abusive, coercive and misleading”“As we embark on solidifying our place as the agency industry’s ‘best in class’ organization, all of the agencies already onboard can expect increased benefits along with a clear vision for the future. On the technology side alone, our combined investments in the millions of dollars per annum will allow us to finely tune our focus on selling the value of our agents in the marketplace,” added Block. “Bringing these three powerhouse brands into the broader Travel Leaders Network translates into unparalleled cohesive strength as we work within the greater travel industry, accelerated growth for our agencies, heightened technological and marketing capabilities, and elimination of duplicate efforts from our combined leadership and support staff, who can now focus entirely on delivering the leading-edge innovations for which we’re celebrated.”Stephen McGillivray, Chief Marketing Officer for Travel Leaders Group said the marketing staff across Travel Leaders Group has been operating as a singular team for several years. “Our team looks forward to collaborating even more closely with our supplier partners executing customer-generating marketing that will benefit our Travel Leaders Network agencies and their more than 35,000 travel agents,” he said.More news:  Air Canada’s global sales update includes Managing Director, Canada & USA SalesThe new Travel Leaders Network will continue to offer varying levels of participation. Apart from the combined organization’s new name, participating agencies will see few changes before 2017. Major changes include:Agent Profiler – By 2017, bios from all qualifying agents from Results! Travel and Vacation.com will be added to travelleaders.com’s existing Agent Profiler directory, thus further elevating the award-winning program’s search engine optimization (SEO) for every participating agent. The greater SEO value enables Travel Leaders Network to be better positioned to take on external competition.Annual Conference – Beginning in 2017, Travel Leaders Network will convene an ‘overlapping’ convention in which Travel Leaders Associates will share their final day with the first day for Members from the rest of Travel Leaders Network. Associates and Members of Travel Leaders Network will continue to take part in separate sets of sessions, training and networking events tailored for their specific needs.Marketing – While Travel Leaders Associates will continue to receive marketing specifically branded for their needs, the blended marketing team will be more focused on providing “innovative solutions and additional marketing publications designed to break through”, more effectively competing with forces beyond the traditional travel agency space.Technology Access – Based on participation agreements agents will have access to programs including CruisePRO, AgentMate and corporate business solutions.Agent Universe – By 2017 each of the existing agency extranets will migrate to one Agent Universe platform. Content will be delineated based on individual agency participation agreements. Travelweek Group Changes afoot as Vacation.com, sister companies form Travel Leaders Networkcenter_img Share << Previous PostNext Post >> Wednesday, August 17, 2016 last_img read more

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