May 6, 2021
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first_imgEducation is a crucial to Rufus Reid. The composer, bassist, and longtime teacher, who is the 2016 Harvard University Jazz Master in Residence, sponsored by the Office for the Arts at Harvard (OFA) and Harvard Jazz Bands, knows it from personal experience.“Most people don’t like things they don’t know,” says Reid, a two-time Grammy nominee. Reid himself — who studied with bassists from the Chicago Symphony — used to say he didn’t like classical music. “I was ignorant about it,” he says now. “I didn’t understand it.”Reid, who helped create the Jazz Studies and Performance Program at William Paterson University, sees that same challenge with jazz. “A lot of people say they don’t like jazz, but they’ve never really heard it. Once they learn a little bit, they say, ‘Wow, that’s great.’”Now retired from full-time teaching, the 72-year-old musician is spending a week at Harvard, leading the Harvard Jazz Bands and the Wind Ensemble in master classes. In addition, the public is invited to participate in two events with Reid: a conversation with Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music, on Wednesday at 4 p.m. in Holden Chapel, and a tribute concert on Saturday at 8 p.m., during which he will join the Harvard Jazz Bands (Yosvany Terry and Mark Olson, conductors) in “The Eloquent One: Celebrating Rufus Reid” at Sanders Theatre. The concert will feature several of Reid’s compositions, including the title number and two pieces from “Quiet Pride: The Elizabeth Catlett Project,” an homage to the African-American sculptor.“Ultimately, we as composers are trying to find ways to surprise the listener,” says Reid, who garnered his two 2015 Grammy nominations for “Quiet Pride.” “To surprise them — and still keep them.”Reid’s life has been a journey of discovery. Although he began playing trumpet in junior high school in Sacramento, Calif., Reid found himself drawn to the bass early on. As a member of his school band, Reid recalls, “Every time we took a break, people would go out and play ball or whatever, and I would want to go touch the bass.” While the trumpet earned him a berth in the U.S. Air Force band, he used his free time to pick up the stringed instrument.“It came to me: I could do less of it initially than the trumpet, but I would have more satisfaction and more desire,” he says. “When I got out of the military, I sold my trumpet and bought a bass.” He also began studying it seriously, earning a bachelor of music degree as a performance major on the double bass from Northwestern.The bass, he explains, “is the core or the foundation of any ensemble, whether it be a symphony orchestra or a Latin group. It grounds the ensemble. I tell my students, we have the unique ability to sabotage any band we play in. It’s a lot of power but also a great responsibility.”Since then, Reid has played bass with a panoply of jazz greats, including Dexter Gordon, Lee Konitz, Art Farmer, and Stan Getz.  He credits his first boss, bandleader Eddie Harris, with teaching him how to be a professional musician, understanding the importance of everything from recording to contracts.“Being a professional is a marriage of things you have to be quite aware of in order to be successful,” he says.  From Harris, he says, he learned more than “to play good.” Among other lessons, Reid credits Harris with spurring him to write his 1974 book “The Evolving Bassist,” which is now an industry standard and in 2003 was complemented by a DVD.As a teacher himself, says Reid, he hopes to impart a sense of the “collaboration and compromise” necessary to ensemble playing. “Working together, listening to one another, creates something better than any one person can come up with by themselves,” he says. “And that in itself is what I really feel jazz is, in terms of what we do when it’s done the best — it’s happening at the moment.”Beyond that, he hopes to convey a sense of “sustained passion.”“I have as much passion, if not more, than I did when I was their age,” he says of his students. Many undergraduates at Harvard, he understands, may focus on other disciplines, such as math or the sciences. What matters is the commitment. “I want them to continue that passion,” he says, “whatever it happens to be.”last_img read more

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first_imgBy Ken Bredemeier/Voice of America, edited by Diálogo May 03, 2019 “Military action is possible,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the Fox Business Network. “If that’s what’s required, that’s what the United States will do.” The top U.S. diplomat, however, reiterated that the U.S. would prefer a peaceful transition of power in Caracas from socialist President Nicolás Maduro to the self-declared interim president, Juan Guaidó, the president of the National Assembly who is recognized by the United States and about 50 other countries as the legitimate leader of the South American country. Pompeo’s signal that the U.S. could send troops to Venezuela drew a quick rebuke from Russia, a strong Maduro supporter. Moscow said Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov warned Pompeo in a phone call that further “aggressive steps” by the U.S. in Venezuela would be “fraught with the most serious consequences.” The Russian diplomat denounced what he said was the United States’ “interference” in Venezuela’s internal affairs, calling it “a gross violation of international law.” The U.S. State Department said Pompeo urged Moscow to end its involvement in Venezuela, telling Lavrov that Russian and Cuban actions there would destabilize it and could upend U.S.-Russian relations on a broader scale. Pompeo told interviewers that Maduro, in the face of street protests against his government, was prepared to leave Venezuela for Cuba on April 30, but that Russia convinced him to stay to fight Guaidó’s call for the Venezuelan military to join him in a push to overthrow Maduro. Maduro and the Russian Foreign Ministry denied the Maduro departure allegation, with Moscow saying the U.S. claim was part of its “information war” designed to demoralize the Venezuelan army and foment a coup. Guaidó called for massive May Day street protests May 1—“the biggest in the history of Venezuela”—against the Maduro government. Rock- and Molotov-cocktail throwing protesters and government security troops clashed April 30, with authorities firing live ammunition, water cannons and rubber bullets at the demonstrators, killing one and injuring dozens. Television footage showed one Venezuela National Guard vehicle running over demonstrators who were throwing rocks at the military. The government said one of its soldiers was hit by a bullet. Tear gas smoke wafted across streets in Caracas May 1, with armor-clad police carrying shields to stand defiantly against rock-throwing protesters. Maduro said he would lead his own May Day rally and claimed Guaidó’s attempted coup had been defeated. Maduro congratulated the armed forces for having “defeated this small group that intended to spread violence through putschist skirmishes.” “This will not go unpunished,” Maduro said in a television and radio broadcast. He said demonstrators will be prosecuted “for the serious crimes that have been committed against the constitution, the rule of law and the right to peace.” Thousands of demonstrators have joined the street protests after U.S.-backed Guaidó called for the military to reject Maduro’s rule and switch sides in a campaign he called “Operation Freedom.” Guaidó appeared April 30 alongside opposition politician Leopoldo López, who had been put under house arrest by Maduro, but said he had been “freed” by soldiers supporting Guaidó. López posted a picture of men in uniform on Twitter, with the message, “Venezuela: the definitive phase to end the usurpation, Operation Liberty, has begun.” Later, López and his family went to the Chilean embassy to seek refuge, then moved to the Spanish embassy. April 30 ended without any sign of defections within the military’s top ranks from Maduro to Guaidó. But Guaidó, the leader of the opposition-dominated National Assembly appeared undaunted in a video message posted on social media later in the day. Despite widespread food and medical shortages and a failing economy in Venezuela, the socialist Maduro regime has clung to power with the support of most of the country’s military. Venezuela’s two biggest creditors, Russia and China, also have continued to support Maduro. Meanwhile, the United States has imposed sanctions on Caracas in an effort to curb its international oil sales. Guaidó invoked the constitution to declare himself interim president in January after calling Maduro’s leadership illegitimate because of election fraud. In a related development, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an order late on April 30, banning all U.S. airlines from flying in Venezuela’s airspace below 7,000 meters until further notice, citing “increasing political instability and tensions.” The FAA also ordered all air operators in Venezuela, including private jets, to leave the country.last_img read more

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first_img(REUTERS)-Olympic champion Ruth Jebet smashed the world record for the women’s 3,000 metres steeplechase by more than six seconds at the Paris Diamond League meeting yesterday.The 19-year-old, who was born in Kenya and runs for Bahrain, clocked eight minutes 52.78 seconds, more than nine seconds ahead of Olympic silver medallist Hyvin Kiyeng Jepkemoi of Kenya who finished second.The previous record of 8:58.81 was set by Russian Gulnara Galkina at the Beijing Olympics eight years ago.Jebet narrowly missed out on the world record when she won Bahrain’s first-ever Olympic gold medal in Rio de Janeiro this month.It was clear that the world record was in danger after Jebet completed the first kilometre in 2:56.36.She went through the second kilometre in 5:54.16 compared toGalkina’s split time of 6:01.20 in her record-breaking run in Beijing.“I tried many times to beat the world record and today we decided to push each other to go for a good time,” said Jebet.“I was not expecting such a big difference with the record. I think I finished my season today.”last_img read more

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first_imgThe Bet9ja Nigeria National League (NNL) have banned Crown FC of Ogbomoso from playing at their home ground, the Soun Township Stadium following ceaseless crowd violence against match officials and visiting teams.The club will now play the remainder of their home games in Abeokuta, with the League Management also ruling that the Soun Township Stadium in Ogbomoso will not host NNL games for the next two years.“Official Report received by the league management body indicts Supporters and officials of Crown FC for assaulting match referees and players and officials of their opponent, Abia Comets in matchday 29 fixture in the Southern Conference.” An official statement from the NNL explains.“The supporters of Crown descended on the match officials and beat them up with security personnel watching without intervention, the uniform of the center referee was torn and stop watches of the three officials were destroyed.”Two officials of Crown FC, Mr. Adetunde Adewunmi, the team manager and Mr. Alabi Jonathan, who is the Team’s Physio, were also suspended from all NNL activities indefinitely and are to face the League’s Compliance Unit on Wednesday 27th of September 2017.Furthermore, Crown FC was handed heavy monetary fines as stated below:To pay the sum of N2, 000.000, 00 (Two million) for beating match officials and the away team.Will pay N1, 500,000 being compensation to match officials on items damaged as well as for two Camera of Abia Comets destroyed.Pay N500,000.00 (Five hundred thousand) as medical bills for match officials, Abia Comets Players and officials assaulted.NNL added: “management has equally mandated the Oyo State Football Association and Crown FC management to produce the assailants involved in the attack of match officials and to ensure they are brought before the NNL Compliance Division before their next home game.” RelatedNNL Match Day 2 Roundup: FC Taraba Secure Controversial Victory As Crown FC, Kaduna Utd Record Home WinsApril 22, 2019In “NNl”Eugenio LamannaJune 30, 2017Similar postClubs revolt as NFF fail to resolve NNL Super 8 crisisDecember 19, 2018In “NFF”last_img read more

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