June 21, 2021
  • 7:30 am Committee reaffirms mandatory denominational health plan
  • 7:27 am Rapidísimas
  • 7:23 am Video: Presiding Bishop Curry on World Refugee Day
  • 7:22 am Episcopalians approach Donald Trump’s inauguration with prayer
  • 7:20 am Episcopal racial reconciliation event draws large crowd in Lexington, Virginia

first_imgThis summer, American folk-rock hero Bob Dylan will release Rolling Thunder Revue: The 1975 Live Recordings. The mammoth box set will include a mind-blowing 148 tracks from five full Dylan sets that were professionally recorded throughout the 1975 caravan/tour. The ambitious box set will also include three discs of rehearsals and one disc of rare performances.On Tuesday, Dylan shared a recording of him and his band rehearsing “One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)”, which took place prior to the tour at the Seacrest Motel in Falmouth, MA.Related: Bob Dylan To Open ‘Heaven’s Door’ Whiskey Distillery & Center For The Arts In Nashville In 2020The rehearsal of the song, which would go on to appear on Dylan’s 1976 Desire LP, hears Dylan opening the performance with the strumming of his acoustic guitar before powerfully belting out the song’s opening lyrics. Dylan and his guitar are accompanied in the raw recording by limited instrumentation including the violin, a simple drum beat, and backing vocalists during the song’s folk-like chorus. In all, the recording sounds more like a collaboration between passing gypsies in the street than that of the generation’s most acclaimed songwriters–which perfectly matches the spirit of Rolling Thunder‘s touring caravan of musicians. Fans can hear the new recording in the video below.Bob Dylan – “One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)”[Video: Bob Dylan]Fans will also get the chance to dive into the wild world of Dylans’ 1975 tour when the Martin Scorsese-directed documentary, Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story, arrives on Netflix just a few days after the arrival of the box set on June 11th. The Rolling Thunder Revue: The 1975 Live Recordings is scheduled to arrive on June 7th. Fans can click here to pre-order the album box set.last_img read more

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first_img“Knowing when to start the music is always one of my favorite jobs,” said Jason Robert Brown, striding to a Steinway piano in the corner of the Davison Room in the Loeb Music Library.The Tony Award-winning Broadway composer, who is the Blodgett Distinguished Artist-in-Residence at Harvard this spring, was guest teaching in Professor Carol Oja’s seminar on American musical theater.He sounded a low, dirge-like note on the piano. “Music changes the tenor of the room,” Brown said, striking the key over and over. “No matter what you’re talking about” — dum — “the music will determine the entire context in which you hear that” — dum — “so that what I’m saying sounds vaguely ominous” — dum. “This just changed the molecules of the room that much.”Next came a staccato plink.Plink.Plink.Plink.“If I did this, you’d all be sitting and waiting to find out what I was going to tell you. That’s how powerful music can be. … If you start the music, the audience [is] waiting for something to happen. I have to be very respectful of what I want the audience to feel. The music’s going to change everything.”Brown, composer and lyricist of the musical “The Last Five Years” and Tony-award winning composer of “Parade,” has been described by the Philadelphia Inquirer as “one of Broadway’s smartest and most sophisticated songwriters since Stephen Sondheim.” His new Broadway musical, “The Bridges of Madison County,” directed by Bartlett Sher, with a book by Marsha Norman based on Robert James Waller’s novel, opened in January.As an artist in residence, Brown is participating in Oja’s seminar and giving master classes and workshops for students through the Office for the Arts’ Learning From Performers program.His music will be showcased in a sold-out concert-cabaret performance at the American Repertory Theater’s Oberon stage at 8 p.m. Thursday, and will feature performances by Harvard student vocalists. Brown also is working with students on a piece of musical theater that the students are writing and singing. The class production is April 23 from noon to 2 p.m. at [email protected] Garden.“Jason Robert Brown is one of the major talents on Broadway today, and his appointment as Blodgett Artist-in-Residence has given the students in my seminar an exceptional opportunity to explore his work in depth, doing so with him by their side,” said Oja, the William Powell Mason Professor of Music.The aspiring actors and songwriters in Oja’s seminar on March 5 heard Brown and his “Bridges” collaborators, Norman and Sher, discuss the creative process behind a Broadway show.Norman described “Bridges,” an operatic musical based on the novel about a brief but passionate love affair in the Iowa heartland, as a “story of longing and loss and love that doesn’t work out.” Brown said he wrote the music for the show because he “wanted big singers to do big singing.”Brown used the music and lyrics from his composition “Before and After You / A Million Miles,” structurally the most complicated in the show, to illustrate the building blocks he uses to make a song.He explained, “You can understand the song as functioning in four sections: She says a thing, he says a thing, he says a thing that has to transform the whole information, and then they sing a thing together.“If this song were in German, if this song were in some strange Martian language, and I explained to you the structural elements of it, you could sing it in gibberish and it would still make sense. Because the structure is always designed to get us from one place to the next.”The creative team described the collaborative process. “These things are hard to make,” said Sher of Broadway musicals, noting that “Bridges” has been four years in the works. “It’s a very thrilling and exhausting process, because you’re changing things all the way to the end.”The mix of artistic visions that makes the process rewarding also makes it challenging, Brown said. “If you are strong, you want to be working with strong people,” he said. Yet, he continued, “The idea of collaborating with a capital C” with equally strong-minded partners means accepting that they “are going to have ideas that you simply cannot get behind. [This] really requires you to ask: ‘Can I not get behind it because it’s a bad idea … or because I didn’t come up with it?’“The whole reason you work with somebody strong is to find out if they’re going to elevate your piece,” he said. “That’s what you want.”The music department’s Blodgett Artist-in-Residence program supports lectures and performances by visiting artists in a variety of musical disciplines. The Learning From Performers program, sponsored by the Office for the Arts, likewise aims to boost student engagement in the arts while integrating the arts more fully into University life.“Working with both Professor Oja and Jason Robert Brown this semester has been very fulfilling artistically,” said Julia Biedry ’16, a soprano with the Harvard-Radcliffe Veritones. “I love the opportunities to perform in class, and I love that I’m getting the chance to perform with Jason Robert Brown in his concert at the Oberon.”Madeline Smith ’14 hopes to end up on Broadway herself. The performer with the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club and the Radcliffe Pitches said her University experience will help her get there.“I’ve been fortunate enough to conduct pit orchestras, music direct everything from Bernstein to Jason Robert Brown, and compose my thesis. How am I qualified to do any of that? I’m not,” she said. “But Harvard’s support system is so brilliant, you’re never far from a world-renowned conductor, composer, or director. The most consistent and familiar feeling of my Harvard experience has been coming home from rehearsal (to start homework at 1 a.m.), and only thinking: I’m the luckiest girl in the world. Why do I get to do this?”last_img read more

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first_imgAs you travel through six counties, several cities, and countless towns, you’ll find some of the finest outdoor recreation and craft drinks Virginia has to offer. Running along the Interstate 81 corridor through the Shenandoah Valley, the spirits trail is a great way to take in the mountain views with a drink in your hand. Cooter’s place in Page County, photo courtesy of Shenandoah Spirits Trail (Left) Step back in time at Dinosaur Land. (Right) Get Greek to go at Santorini Grill. Photos courtesy of Shenandoah Spirits Trail Featuring 23 wineries, 22 breweries, three cideries, and two distilleries, you’re sure to find a drink that satisfies your post-adventure cravings. Discover the best photo opportunities and places to eat in this guide to the Shenandoah Spirits Trail. A One of a Kind Trip WanderLove is about reconnecting with what you love. Experience scenic vistas, local restaurants, and all of the winding roads in between when you road trip the Shenandoah Spirits Trail through the northern Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. You’ll find a little bit of everything when you stop at Heard’s Cedar Hill Farm Market. From local meats and produce to fishing gear, grab all the supplies you’ll need for a day at Shenandoah River State Park. Or make a stop at The Apple House for delicious apple butter cinnamon donuts, a gift shop stocked with Virginia products, and a photo with the stainless steel LOVEwork made locally in Warren County. When you’re done exploring the area, Front Royal Brewing Company is the perfect place to order takeout from, including specials like mac n beer cheese, canned beer, and specialty cocktails.  Heard’s Cedar Hill Farm Market, photo courtesy of Shenandoah Spirits Trail The Barn at Creekside, photo courtesy of Shenandoah Spirits Trailcenter_img With all of these stops and more, you’ll want to keep coming back year after year. Experience WanderLove for yourself when you visit the Shenandoah Spirits Trail. Please check local guidelines and regulations before making plans to get outside. Remember to practice social distancing guidelines, wear a mask, and respect others’ health when outside. Cooter’s Place in Page County is the go to spot for fans of The Dukes of Hazzard, featuring a museum, replica garage, and live music on Saturdays. Then visit Luray Caverns for an excursion underground and a photo with the LOVEworks constructed from wooden logs. Fill up on delicious tacos and nachos from Mr. Garcia’s Mexican Grill and Cantina before settling in for a drink from Castle Vineyards on a working cattle farm. Immerse yourself in a world of vintage finds at The Barn at Creekside Farm in Rockingham County. As you stroll through the various vendor booths, uncover uncommon delights to decorate your home or give as gifts. Then grab lunch or dinner to go from Hank’s Grille and Catering, featuring a wide variety of mouth watering southern dishes from beef brisket and baked beans to fried catfish and coleslaw. Finish your day at Showalter’s Orchard for a refreshing glass of Old Hill Cider as you soak in the views of the Shenandoah Valley. Take a photo with the LOVEwork on site highlighting the rolling hills and Blue Ridge Mountains behind you. Don’t miss the American Celebration on Parade at Shenandoah Caverns, featuring floats from the Rose Parade, Thanksgiving Day Parade, and presidential inaugurations. This unique collection of parade props and stage settings from throughout American entertainment and political history will inspire visitors of all ages. Then swing by the LOVEworks celebrating all things Woodstock, including the “O” represented by a hot air balloon, for a photo before picking up a gourmet sandwich or seasonal entree to go from Woodstock Cafe. Nearby Woodstock Brewhouse offers a menu full of locally crafted beverages in a renovated industrial building for the beer lover. American Celebration Parade, photo courtesy Shenandoah Spirits Trail No matter where you stop along the Shenandoah Spirits Trail, you’ll find unique roadside attractions, locally made LOVEworks, delicious dining options, and craft beverages that add up to an experience you won’t soon forget. A trip to Clarke County wouldn’t be complete without a stop at Dinosaur Land. Step back into prehistoric times to the Mesozoic era with over 50 towering dinosaurs scattered around the property. Head over to the Santorini Grill for authentic Greek cuisine to go, including gyros, moussaka, and falafel platters. Relax and unwind with a glass of wine on the porch at Twin Oaks Tavern Winery to celebrate a beautiful day in the valley.last_img read more

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