May 17, 2021
  • 5:49 pm Comment: Will the government HR policy please stand up?
  • 5:48 pm Training the labour force
  • 5:47 pm EOC wants dads’ rights extended
  • 5:47 pm Flexibility pays off
  • 5:47 pm HR urged to champion racial cause

first_imgThis year, the Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) program at Saint Mary’s is celebrating its 30th anniversary. Department chair Stacy Davis said the program officially began in September of 1985 as a minor only.“Classes in women’s studies had been offered since 1972,” Davis said. “We started teaching an introductory course in 1994, and we had student-designed majors from the mid-1990s until 2013. This is our first year as a department with a major, so the 30th anniversary is a celebration of that accomplishment.”Davis said the GWS program has a strong presence throughout the Saint Mary’s curriculum.“The major would not have happened without the support of our faculty, who teach courses in over a dozen departments and programs that count for GWS,” Davis said. “Currently, we have five majors and 14 students will graduate with a minor in GWS this spring.”Sophomore GWS major Michaela Gaughan said the program is important because it sheds light on important issues related to gender on a global scale.“I think it is important for colleges to have GWS programs because they promote gender differences, create an understanding about gender [and] challenge students to think about the concept of gender,” Gaughan said. “I think it is important for women’s colleges to have GWS programs because historically women have faced inequality on the basis of their gender. I believe GWS programs provide insight to students about historical struggles women have endured along with present current challenges women face.”Sophomore GWS major Kylie Garabed said having such a program on campus is beneficial because it can create a “feminist presence.”“A feminist presence will make sure that the student body is aware of the social issues by holding lectures and events, and this will bring the issue of inequality to the minds of the student body,” Garabed said.Davis said the Saint Mary’s GWS program has hosted several events on campus and in the community. It co-sponsored panels on the films The Hunting Ground and Fifty Shades of Grey, South Bend’s first Slutwalk and an event with the Girl Scouts with Michiana. The program also sponsored a talk by Joel Barrett, a writer who spoke about his experiences with ex-gay therapy.Garabed said she has found the GWS program to be a rewarding experience.“This program is truly amazing. The professors are all great and so passionate about what they are teaching,” she said. “All of the classes that I’ve had to take for my major have taught me so much more about myself and the world than I could have expected. I think everyone should try to take some sort of GWS course in their time at Saint Mary’s because it is just it is so rewarding.”Garabed said GWS courses concern more than just women’s studies.“Here at Saint Mary’s, we have a variety of gender and women’s studies courses that relate to masculinity and LGBTQ … taking one GWS course can provide a student with a new perspective on many social issues and inequalities. Saint Mary’s has a GWS program that is open to all individuals who share different perspectives and beliefs. The best part about going to class is knowing it is going to be discussion-based, and you’ll have the opportunity to share your perspective as well as discover something new.”Tags: 30th anniversary, Department of Gender and Women’s Studieslast_img read more

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first_img Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThe front office has kept up communication with players, and they have common threads that keep them connected. But the coronavirus pandemic has led the league to ask them to keep physically separate.It brings a chill to the words LeBron James said just Tuesday after a loss to the Brooklyn Nets, when asked how the chemistry in the Lakers’ locker room has helped them navigate everything from a politically volatile trip to China to the tragic helicopter crash that took the life of Kobe Bryant, his daughter and seven others.“The best way to maintain your focus,” he said, “is being around the guys that you’ve been with throughout the season.”It’s been a common theme of the challenges the Lakers have faced this season: togetherness. Until now.The chemistry the Lakers talk about constantly was built, in many ways, overseas during their preseason visit to Shanghai and Shenzhen in October. Like now, but for wildly different reasons, the Lakers were encouraged to stay inside. Individual business deals and scheduled appearances were canceled. Players did not speak to the media. Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed LOS ANGELES — Unlike many gyms in many places, the Lakers’ practice facility was not empty on Friday.But it wasn’t vibrant, either.On Wednesday, which turned out to be the last day of practice the Lakers will have for a still unknown stretch, the session wrapped up with banter, shooting games and laughter. Two days later, the players who did choose to come into work came by themselves, following league-wide mandates and suggested health expert guidelines to keep distance from one another.History should already regard the last 12 months as the wildest year of the Lakers franchise. It’s been filled with challenges that few could have imagined – and when taken as a whole, it transcends imagining. Throughout those times, the Laker players have at least had each other’s company to ride out rough seas. Now thanks to a grimly necessary policy of social distancing, they don’t even have that. How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error In their hotel rooms, the Lakers spent significantly more time with each other than they originally planned. Lunches and dinners became team affairs.“To me, it was an early, good sign that we were going to have great chemistry this year,” Coach Frank Vogel said later. “When you deal with adversity before you really even hit the ground and you’re able to kind of grow and be together like that, it was just an early sign that our chemistry was going to be strong.”One of the relatively forgotten dramas took place not long after in October, as James and Anthony Davis were among those evacuated from their homes during the Getty Fire. James, in particular, detailed a harrowing early morning shuffle to get his wife and children out of their Brentwood home and into a hotel – an experience he shared with many Angelenos who found themselves potentially at risk.He went on to buy tacos for first responders fighting the fire. A day removed from the evacuation, he played in a victory over Memphis – a demonstration to his teammates that he was ready to play through even adverse off-the-court circumstances. That tone was set for the season down the roster as many of the Lakers have toughed out minor ailments: Eight players have played at least 54 of the 63 games so far this season.They were together again for what probably still stands as the most emotionally challenging event of the season: They learned of Bryant’s death mid-air during a cross-country flight home from Philadelphia. After Vogel went through the difficult business of telling them of the news one-by-one, they wept together. Many of them prayed together.Later that week, the team hosted a closed luncheon where they shared many of their favorite Kobe stories. For nearly a week, the Lakers were mostly bunkered in the practice facility with one another and did not speak with reporters.In their first game back at Staples Center against Portland, Vogel made a point to check in on everyone on the roster: “We all share in it this week. And we were all on that plane together.”Even as the NBA took small steps preceding the dramatic suspension of the season, the inference was that the Lakers would spend more time among themselves. Their locker room was closed. The presumption was that they would play games in near-empty arenas, which they didn’t love, but which they felt prepared for.The season had started with them isolated from the world – they could deal with that.Related Articles Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs “Just kind of like you’ve got to bring your own energy like you’re playing pickup,” Davis said. “It will be different. But that’s still our job to go out there and perform, and if that happens, that’s what we’ll do.”Now, they find themselves facing another challenge, but sequestered away in their own quarters. Some saw the adversity as a fire-hardening of sorts, one that would toughen the Western Conference leaders (49-14) for the grind of the playoffs. Now the season is in question, and so is everything the Lakers have worked for. They broke their playoff drought by clinching a postseason berth, but there might not be a postseason. With James at 35, his last best chance to win a fourth NBA title in his prime could be slipping away, and so could the Lakers’ best shot at No. 17 depending on many factors entering a pivotal summer, including Davis’ free agency.The players have provided subtle glimpses into how they’re filling time. Early in the week, LeBron James posted Instagram stories of old Heat highlights. On Friday, Alex Caruso was playing Fortnite on Twitch, the gaming streaming platform. Jared Dudley was tweeting while watching reruns of one of his games at Boston College.The Lakers are still all going through challenges, but for the first time, apart. For the toughest parts of the season, they had the game, and they had each other. Without those to lean on, they might be facing their most difficult stretch of all – and no one yet knows how long that will last.last_img read more

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first_img Here at England Golf we’re telling the stories of our wonderful volunteers, starting with Liz Haughton, the junior organiser at Greetham Valley Golf Club, Lincolnshire.If you volunteer in golf we’d love to hear your story and what you have achieved. It will help us to develop our Volunteer Action Plan which will help shape the support we provide to volunteers, clubs and our partners.You can get in touch by contacting Matt Bloor, England Golf Volunteer Manager, at [email protected] But now, read on to find out about Liz Haughton (pictured):Liz got into golf because her husband played and quite quickly became a county player, then took a break to have a family before returning to the game when her children also began to play. Liz took on the role of Junior Organiser about three years ago because she felt there was an opportunity to improve the junior section at the club. This is her first volunteer role in golf.Creating a relaxed family atmosphere around the junior section has really worked at Greetham Valley GC. Parents are involved as much as possible, even playing in the roll-ups and this year the club held an Adult and Junior Pairs Open, which was a great success with around 50 entries.The members are great with juniors and there are no restrictions on playing in competitions at the club. However there are also junior roll-ups every week during the summer and varied social events throughout the year which have included trips to the British Masters and pre-season away days.Liz said: “Our Junior Section is growing year by year and by combining competitive golf and fun, social activities, we seem to have found the perfect balance!”Facebook plays a pivotal role in organising junior activity and has proved a great way for the juniors to connect with each other. There is a closed group for members and Liz has recently set up an open group, which is already attracting a good following.Matt Bloor, England Golf Volunteer Manager, commented: “The junior section has developed some really good young golfers and is also having team success in the County League. But, perhaps more importantly, the section has grown considerably under Liz’s tenure and is fantastic at retaining juniors because of the atmosphere and overall experience.”Liz gets great satisfaction from the role and the interaction with juniors: “Seeing the amazing progress that the juniors are making with their golf and their increased social confidence is incredibly rewarding. I am very proud of them all!”The Greetham Valley experience shows that creating a sociable environment and enjoyable experiences on and off the course are key components to developing a healthy junior section. Tags: Liz Haughton, Volunteer 21 Nov 2017 Golf’s hidden heroes – the stories of our volunteers last_img read more

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first_imgBy Kathy MieleIt was after dinner and my son Alex and I were taking a walk around the neighborhood.We didn’t have to go far before the fragrance of our neighbors’ grill seemed to fill the air. I inhaled deeply. “I have to say I love the smell of a steak cooking on the grill,” I said to Alex as we were busy walking off our dinner of hamburgers that I’d cooked on the stove.“It does smell good,” Alex agreed. We walked a little further when he turned to me and asked, “Why don’t we barbecue anymore?”“That’s a good question.” We’d made it to the end of the block when a new smell overwhelmed us. “Wow, whatever they’re cooking, it sure was marinated with a lot of garlic! It smells great!”As we walked further along I tried to think of when we’d used our grill last. It had been so long ago that I couldn’t even remember if we had any propane left in the tank. We hadn’t grilled this season and I’m pretty sure we didn’t last summer either.“Your dad’s not big on grilling.” I explained.“Why does Dad have to be the one at the grill?” Alex asked. “You could do it.”“Are you kidding? I’m busy getting everything ready in the kitchen!” I argued. “I can’t be walking outside every 5 minutes checking on a piece of meat! It’s easier for me to just cook it inside with everything else!”“O.k.,” Alex sounded wary. “I didn’t mean to get you upset.”“I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to snap at you,” I apologized. “I’m just not big on grill cooking.”We walked a few blocks more in silence until we came across a new smell. “Someone’s cooking with charcoal.” I said. “I have to say I love the smell of lighter fluid.”“Isn’t lighter fluid like gasoline?” Alex asked. “It can’t be good for you.”“I’m sure it’s not good for you but nobody really thought about that when I was a kid.” I had to smile when a favorite memory popped into my head. “My dad would use so much lighter fluid you could actually taste it on the burger,” I told Alex.“I think I’d rather skip the charcoal grill and stick with the propane,” Alex said as he kicked a stone down the road.“You know I could teach you how to cook on the grill,” I said.“Why would I want to do that?” Alex asked.“It’s a great skill to learn.”“Let’s see,” Alex said then thought for a moment. “You don’t cook on the grill and neither does Dad but somehow you think I’m going to like doing it?”“I didn’t say you’d like doing it. I really can’t think of anyone who likes standing outside during a heat wave and cooking over an open flame. It’s really all about the flavor you get when you cook on a barbecue.”“You know what I like the flavor of?” Alex said. “The cheeseburger you made tonight. It was perfect!”“I’m getting the feeling that I’m not going to be able to talk you into manning the grill this summer.”“Nope.” We were coming around the corner of our block and our walk was almost over. Alex gave me a quick pat on the back. “But, that was a really great try.”last_img read more

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first_imgBy Jay Cook |HIGHLANDS – Still recovering from damages caused by Super Storm Sandy five years ago, the borough is taking steps to possibly upgrade a pair of forlorn properties within town lines: one in the hills and another along the bay.The Highlands Land Use Board announced on July 12 that they received bids for two different requests for proposals (RFP) to look at designating both Captain’s Cove Marina and Shadow Lawn Trailer Park as official “areas in need of redevelopment.”Both sites have been regular agenda items at Borough Council and Land Use Board meetings throughout the past decade, whether it be from plans to change zoning ordinances or for infrastructure upgrades in the post-Sandy era.“Last year, it was one of the priorities of the council to really do something with these two properties,” said Highlands Borough Council President Carolyn Broullon.Mobile homes like these cover nearly 8 acres of the developable land in Shadow Lawn Trailer Park.The council sent a recommendation to the Land Use Board in December 2016 for the committee to look at how the two properties could potentially be redeveloped through the Local Redevelopment and Housing Law.By meeting one of seven associated criteria, the designation is designed to supersede existing municipal zoning laws, a move that potentially greases the skids for cleaning up blighted areas. Per county tax records, the property was valued at over $2.2 million this year.Broullon concurred, saying “if (Shadow Lawn) is deemed to be an area in need of redevelopment, it opens up a wide scope for the property owner, as well as the borough.”The other parcel under discussion is Captain’s Cove Marina, located at 2 Washington Avenue in the downtown section of town.Per Captain’s Cove’s website, the marina has called Highlands home for more than 110 years. It has 92 boat slips for boats up to 38 feet long, six slips on floating docks, and three self-operating boat lifts, as stated on the webpage.According to meeting minutes, Fred Rosiack, the property owner, said at a November 2016 Land Use Board meeting that his marina had been almost 50 percent destroyed after Sandy.Captain’s Cove in HighlandsHe noted that he had two potential buyers for the parcel who backed out when learning the property was zoned in a residential area and not for a marina use. Rosiack also said he has been looking to reinvigorate the café located near the bulkhead, yet would need a variance to do so.Damages from Sandy are still visible today at Captain’s Cove Marina. Pilings along the Washington Avenue side are snarled and deteriorated. Only a few slipholders have steps to reach the ladders in their slips. The café, as Rosiack had said to the Land Use Board, is virtually unusable – much of the siding is ripped off, showing a previous coat of weathered red paint beneath.Rosiack also did not return calls for comment by press time.Broullon said the borough is in its ver y early stages going for ward with the redevelopment area designation, and bringing on planners for each site moves that process forward.Broullon added that Highlands “could do so much more” with the two properties.“If they’re developed in a way that brings in more for our residents, that’s a bigger tax base that can help the whole borough,” she said.This article was first published in the July 20-27, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times. Both the ordinance change and development project led to longstanding litigation spanning over four years. Pauline Jennings, a resident fighting the ordinance change, sued the borough and Highlander Development over the change, and eventually won when her case reached state Superior Court. That decision threw out the zoning update and Highlander Development’s building application.Representatives with Highlander Development did not respond to requests for comment by press time.Recently, borough documents show an impetus to redevelop the Shadow Lawn property. Per a 2016 Master Plan Reexamination Report, the mobile home park “is one of the few tracts of land remaining in the borough.”The report promotes redevelopment of the property through mixed use, considering “its proximity to Route 36 and multifamily home districts and its location at the top of the hill.”center_img The future of Shadow Lawn Trailer Park has bounced around borough meetings for at least the past decade.According to a Housing Element and Fair Share Plan report adopted by Highlands last year, Shadow Lawn is an approximately 120-unit mobile home park on 13 acres of developed and undeveloped land. It sits in the hills along Route 36, between the highway and the Eastpointe Condominium complex, a 14-story residential apartment building.The only ingress to the mobile home park is directly across from the QuickChek rear exit on Ocean Boulevard, near where Route 36 splits westbound, traveling towards Middletown. The main road through the development is Laurel Drive.According to court documents, the Highlands Borough Council looked to change zoning ordinances at Shadow Park in 2007 to allow for uses other than just a mobile home park, its current zoning. There were residents concerned over potential high-rise development at the site, yet the ordinance was ultimately approved in December 2007.Highlander Development Group, the property owner, came to the Land Use Board two years later with a plan to build three high-rise residential buildings with 282 units, a swimming pool, clubhouse, a multistory garage and other associated site improvements. The plan was ultimately approved in October 2010, per Land Use Board documents.last_img read more

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first_imgRossland’s Gnarlies Angels and the Babes of Brutality of Salmo continue to be the talk of the West Kootenay Women’s Flat Track Roller Derby League following the latest stop on the tour Friday in Castlegar.Gnarlies Angels took care of the Dam City Rollers while Babes of Brutality got past a short-staffed Lumber Jackies of Nelson in the second leg of Friday’s twin bill.The Castlegar stop is the fourth of the season in the league.Friday, the Gnarlies, with a few of key players resting, powered past the improving Dam City Rollers. Penalties proved to be the undoing for the Rollers, which continually found players jammers in the box instead of on the floor.In the nightcap, the Lumber Jackies needed to use players from rival Killjoys for the match against the Babes.The League is back in action July 8 at the Nelson and District Community Complex Arena.Game action has the Killjoys meeting the Babes of Brutality and the Lumber Jackies up against Dam City Rollers.This is the final regular season game of the season.In Castlegar on July 23 is the first round of the playoffs featuring the fourth-place team in regular season standings meeting the fifth-best squad.Semi Final round goes August 19 in Rossland with the second and third teams playing to see which club advances into the final September 10, also in Rossland.Kannibelles fifth at Best of the WestThe Kootenay Kannibelles — an all-star team of players from the West Kootenay Women’s Flat Track Roller Derby League — made it look easy during the Best of the West Roller Derby Tournament Saturday in the Okanagan.The Kannibelles defeated Saskatchewan 190-76 and Calgary 180-105 to finish fifth in the eight-team event.Rules in a Roller Derby GameFlat Track Roller Derby uses many of the same rules of the older banked track sport seen on television during the 60’s and 70’s.Each heat begins with a pack of blockers lead by two pivots. The two jammers from each team, who score the points, start a 10 meters behind the pack and begin skating when the last blocker crosses the pivot line.The jammers work their way through the pack of blockers to score points. However, only the lead jammer will score points.The season opened in Rossland in [email protected]last_img read more

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