May 12, 2021
  • 6:00 am The pattern of growth and translocation of photosynthate in a tundra moss, Polytrichum alpinum
  • 5:59 am Aspects of the biology of Antarctomysis maxima (Crustacea: Mysidacea)
  • 5:58 am Belemnite battlefields
  • 5:54 am Middle Jurassic air fall tuff in the sedimentary Latady Formation, eastern Ellsworth Land
  • 5:53 am Concentration, molecular weight distribution and neutral sugar composition of DOC in maritime Antarctic lakes of differing trophic status

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 54-year-old Huntington man riding a Harley Davidson motorcycle was killed Friday night in a collision with another vehicle in Plainview, Nassau County police said. The fatal crash occurred on Woodbury Road shortly after 11 p.m., police said. Robert Stawkowski was operating the 2001 Harley Davidson when it collided with a Toyota turning onto Woodbury Road, police said. Stawkowski was traveling with a 41-year-old female passenger at the time of the crash, police said. The motorcycle was unable to avoid making contact with the rear of the car, police said. Stawkowski was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. The woman was transported to a local hospital for treatment of her injuries. Police did not characterize her injuries. The 21-year-old driver of the Toyota was not injured. Both vehicles were impounded for a brake and safety check, police said, adding that there appears to be no criminality at this time.last_img read more

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first_imgAccording to the Broome County District Attorney Office, Imes was determined to have a loaded semi-automatic pistol, which he used to threaten his former girlfriend and her family. He was also convicted for possessing drugs with the intent to sell. Kawon Imes was convicted of the following charges: BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Friday, Kawon E. Imes was sentenced to 13 years in prison and five years parole for drug and weapon charges. Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance, in the third degree, a Class B FelonyCriminal Possession of a Weapon, in the second degree, a Class C Violent FelonyCriminal Possession of Marijuana, in the third degree, a Class E FelonyCriminally Using Drug Paraphernalia, in the second degree, a Misdemeanor (two counts)Menacing, in the second degree, a Misdemeanor. center_img Imes was originally arrested by the Broome County Sheriff’s Office on Feb. 28. He was indicted by a Grand Jury in April of 2019 and found guilty on Oct. 24. The Johnson City Police and New York State Police also assisted with the case.last_img read more

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first_imgHead coach of Kumasi Asante Kotoko, in a Twitter post, has congratulated Charles Nii Armah popularly called Shatta Wale for his groundbreaking music video with the American icon, Beyoncé.Maxwell Konadu joins a list of personalities to congratulate the Ghanaian dancehall artiste for achieving this feat in the industry.Shatta Wale, recently in a tweet declared his allegiance for Kumasi-based club, Asante Kotoko.According to him, his decision to support Kotoko was due to the appointment of his “Godfather” Kofi Abban being appointed a Board Member at the club.Since my Godfada @kofiAbban19 is now a Board member of Asante kotoko. I am now supporting kotoko with full vim including my fans ..Wukum Apim apim b3ba !!! ⚽️ pic.twitter.com/2ATBDbyELG— SHATTA WALE (@shattawalegh) July 4, 2020The former gaffer of the Black Stars Team B tweeted “The #KING HAS DONE IT AGAIN congratulations Shatta.” Accompanied by a picture of Shatta Wale with Beyoncé.The #KING HAS DONE IT AGAIN congratulations Shatta. pic.twitter.com/VtV8odlTTv— Maxwell Konadu (@Konadu4Maxwell) July 31, 2020Shatta Wale was featured in Beyoncé’s Lion King Project where they recorded the song “Already” which has been making waves since its debut.The song features not only Beyoncé but Major Lazer.The music video of the song was released on Friday, July 31, 2020, ahead of Beyoncé’s premiere of Black Is King film. The film serves as a visual companion to the 2019 album The Lion King: The Gift, a tie-in album curated by Beyoncé for the 2019 remake of The Lion King.last_img read more

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first_imgIn a series of five articles, we share stories from Gift of the Givers volunteers in their own words as the organisation marks its 25th year of serving humanity. We find out more from beekeeper, Owen Williams.Being involved with Gift of the Givers gives Owen Williams a sense of purpose. (Image: Owen Williams)Sulaiman PhilipSouth African humanitarian organisation Gift of the Givers, the largest African organisation of its kind, has brought aid and comfort to people in need in 43 countries.It has ongoing feeding programmes in South Africa, humanitarian missions in war-torn Syria and has helped to free South African hostages in Yemen and Mali. The group, founded and led by Dr Imtiaaz Sooliman, has helped to deliver water to drought stricken areas of South Africa and fed refugees in Somalia.William’s met Dr Sooliman while trying to rescue bee colonies that had survived the Knysna fires. (Image: Honeywood Farms)Owen Williams: BeekeeperI met Dr Sooliman for the first time on 15 June 2017 as Knysna was dealing with the fires that devastated the area. In hindsight it seemed that our paths were destined to cross.The day before, I got a phone call from Grant [Liversay, one of my partners in Honeychild Honey] asking how he coud help with protecting our hives. We had saved a few hives but the bees were starving; we needed to get sugar to make syrup to feed the surviving bees. We abhor artificial feeding, but it was either that or lose the colonies we had rescued.Despite his efforts – and Grant is not a man who understands the word no – we were only able to find a few broken bags of sugar from local supermarkets. Remember, the region had gone from extreme drought to a fire storm and back again. We were not the only beekeepers in dire straits.Grant had heard of this humanitarian organisation whose station was located in the mall. So he went up to them to ask if there was any chance they could spare a few bags of sugar. I can only imagine their thinking when faced with this manic, slightly built redhead asking for sugar. After explaining his need, Emily [Thomas], felt it was important enough to speak to Doc.I feel I should point out that Gift of the Givers was working around the clock but Doc wanted to know more about, as Grant said, “this bee story”. I don’t believe in co-incidence, but when the call came Meagan [Vermaas, William’s partner] was giving free therapeutic massages and I was delivering basic goods donated by the community.We met Doc, explained the need and how unique the Cape Honey bee was. Immediatley he wanted to know how Gift of the Givers could help, but he also wanted to see the bees. Back at Honeychild me, Meagan and Doc were all kitted out in beekeeping gear inspecting a colony I had rescued from the side of the N2.We pulled a frame from the hive, and right there in the middle of the comb was the queen. The sun was just beyond the apex and Doc’s face was lit up by the sun. I could see through the veil as he watched the queen and bees working. He looked so amazed and serene.Doc wanted to know how his organisation could help; he wanted to know our objectives. He suggested we set up an NPO – Hope for the Honeybee – and then Gift of the Givers donated R250,000. We ordered pollen substitute, bought sugar for syrup, collected data on losses, designed a strategy for feeding stations and contacted renowned bee scientists.From what I can tell, Hope for the Honeybee and the support from Gift of the Givers is a world first. In the middle of the kind of human suffering that we saw in Knysna, that they took the time to consider the plight of honey bees speaks to the aura of love and caring that surrounds them. I remember that look on Doc’s face when he was inspecting the hive, and my vision became clear. What we are doing is about the survival of the honeybee and benefits humankind as a whole. There are no personal agendas, just this aura that comes from giving.Through Hope for the Honeybee we are tools that spread the help that springs from Gift of the Givers. I read about the landslides in Freetown; hundreds have died. In the past I would have said a silent prayer. This time I found myself wondering if Gift of the Givers might be headed there and if there was a way I could go along.Williams joined the Gift of the Givers humanitarian mission in Knysna after meeting the team. (Image: Gift of the Givers)Read the next profile on Emily Thomas, who works in logitistics at Gift of the Givers.Our first profile was on medical co-ordinator, Dr YM Essack. Click here to read more.Ahmed Bham is the head of search and rescue. Read his story here.Orthopaedic surgeon, Dr Livan Meneses-Turino, shares his experience in Nepal, Haiti, and Palestine.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Abigail Paxton Utica FFA Reporter 2019-2020On Wednesday October 2, the Utica FFA chapter participated in the 2019 Utica Homecoming Parade. After school on the 2nd the students stayed after and help decorate the float. There were 35 students that participated. Then all the students went up to Utica Elementary where they made slime with the SAC kids teaching them that everything made comes somehow  from agriculture. After that, everyone loaded up on the float, driven by Emily Hill(Utica Vice President 2019-2020) and headed out in the parade. The students threw candy and had an awesome time during the parade! Thank you to Duane Hill for supplying the tractor and Brad and Diana Warner for the wagon for our float!last_img

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first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts anthony myers Tags:#documents#Dropbox#file sync#files#Google#Microsoft#online#privacy#referer headers#security#storage#vulnerabilities Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…center_img Those files you’re storing on cloud services like Dropbox or Box may not be as secure as you think.Both services, like other cloud-storage providers, allow users to share links to their stored documents. But sending those links out, even to trusted individuals, can also inadvertently give third parties access to your files as well, according to findings publicized by the file-sharing company Intralinks—which, by the way, is a competitor to both Box and Dropbox.Dropbox says it’s working to fix the problem by disabling any previously shared links that might be vulnerable to leakage. Box released an email statement saying that it has found no evidence that anyone has abused such “open links” and touting the various privacy settings it offers its users to “help manage access to their content.”Intralinks chief security officer John Landy wrote that his company inadvertently stumbled upon the vulnerability in the course of running a Google Adwords campaign that mentioned its competitors. That campaign turned up shared-file URLs that led straight to sensitive files that ordinary users had stored on Box and Dropbox—including bank records, mortgage applications and tax returns. Security blogger Graham Cluley, who also blogs for Intralink, provides some examples.How That Leakage HappensHow, exactly, that happened involves some conjecture. Landy wrote that some Dropbox and Box users apparently created shared links to their files, which they or their recipients then mistakenly entered into a browser search box instead of the URL bar. Doing so and then clicking on an ad—which may seem a fairly unlikely occurrence, at least until you multiply it by the number of people sharing files across the Internet—would then send the file’s URL to the ad network.One Intralinks executive quoted by Cluley estimated that in one of the company’s Adwords campaign, five percent of all hits (presumably meaning ad clicks) yielded URLs to private files, half of which required no password to access. That “small” campaign turned up more than 300 documents.There’s also a second way links to private files could leak out to the world. If a shared Dropbox or Box document itself contains links to other sites, clicking on one will pass along the document’s URL to the next website as part of what’s known as a referer header, where administrators of the second site could see it.It’s not clear if similar vulnerabilities exist for other cloud-storage services such as Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive.No Password RequiredThe problem for Box and Dropbox is that they don’t make their shared links more secure, Landy wrote. Recipients of shared links should have to log into the service to authenticate themselves by default, he suggested.Dropbox engineering vice president Aditya Agarwal said in a blog post that his company hasn’t detected any malicious attacks involving shared file URLs. Dropbox decided to disable any affected document links anyway. The vulnerability has been patched for any shared links going forward, so only previously shared items are affected.Dropbox customers can recreate their shared links, and the company will restore old links as it confirms that particular documents aren’t vulnerable. Agarwal also noted that Dropbox for Business users can require password access to shared files; ordinary users of Dropbox’s free service don’t have that option.The Dropbox post only addresses one of the two vulnerabilities outlined by Intralinks—the leak-via-referer-header method. In an update, Agarwal wrote that Dropbox is aware that file URLs could leak via search engines that pass them to ad partners, but said that issue is “well known” and that the company “doesn’t consider it a vulnerability.”Like Dropbox for Business customers, users of Box can also require passwords for file access, although in neither case is that security feature turned on by default. “Box also displays a message to help users understand the permissions for their content,” a Box spokesperson said via email.Image of Dropbox CEO Drew Houston by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloudlast_img read more

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