May 11, 2021
  • 6:00 am The pattern of growth and translocation of photosynthate in a tundra moss, Polytrichum alpinum
  • 5:59 am Aspects of the biology of Antarctomysis maxima (Crustacea: Mysidacea)
  • 5:58 am Belemnite battlefields
  • 5:54 am Middle Jurassic air fall tuff in the sedimentary Latady Formation, eastern Ellsworth Land
  • 5:53 am Concentration, molecular weight distribution and neutral sugar composition of DOC in maritime Antarctic lakes of differing trophic status

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76CZX6CzCOI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/76CZX6CzCOI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> If you’re feeling more stressed out lately, you’re not alone. In fact, a new study says, you’ve got plenty of teeth-gritting company.The Forum at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) was stress central on Wednesday afternoon, or more accurately the site of an in-depth discussion about its causes, consequences, and possible remedies for a stress-filled nation. The forum, sponsored by HSPH along with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and National Public Radio (NPR), explored the results of a new poll called “The Burden of Stress in America,” conducted by the three groups.Robert Blendon, professor of health policy and political analysis at HSPH and Harvard Kennedy School, began by saying that a quarter of Americans surveyed reported “high levels of stress” caused by various factors. About 60 percent reported stress related to “poor health conditions,” such as diabetes and heart disease. Other major stressors included parenting teenagers (34 percent) and coping with the effects of low wages (36 percent). Blendon observed that “health problems overwhelmed financial problems” as stressors in the poll.Blendon also discussed the severe consequences of stress, including health-related problems (75 percent of those with high stress reported these), disruption of emotional well-being (63 percent), and difficulty sleeping (56 percent). He said that 75 percent of people experiencing high stress said that it “made it harder to get along with family,” and 70 percent said stress adversely affected their working lives.Harvard Professor Robert Blendon said he was surprised that so much media attention gets paid to “stressed-out” business executives, when low-income people reported such high levels of daily stress.Panelist Kristin Schubert, senior program officer and team director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, expressed surprise at “how many people are dealing with high levels of stress on a daily basis. They face the kind of stress that is toxic, that can impact health directly.” Schubert said that the foundation’s mission is “building a culture of health” that will enable individuals and communities to cope better with stressors such as parenting teenagers, the quest for work-life balance, health problems, and more.Gregory Fricchione, associate chief of psychiatry, director of the Division of Psychiatry and Medicine, and director of the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital, explained how the stress response works inside the human brain.“When our basic needs get frustrated, this gets transferred into stress,” he said. Sometimes, the brain’s stress response is good, as when it quickly goes into full-functioning mode after a car accident, sending signals (such as those to release adrenaline) to other parts of the body to help a person survive. However, some stress is bad, and can make people more vulnerable to health problems, especially long-term.Joshua Riff, medical director and director of health and well-being for Target Corp., agreed with Fricchione on the dual nature of stress: “In the workplace, stress can be really good, motivating people to act, but the wrong amount of stress can be a bad thing.”Moderator Joe Neel of NPR asked the panelists to explain how they relieved stress in their own lives. Blendon said he likes “to go outside and walk around lakes and oceans.” Fricchione enjoys “hiking, swimming, and shoveling snow.” After the audience stopped laughing, Fricchione explained that “doing something repetitive like that can reduce stress, and it also feels good when you stop.” Schubert uses “deep breathing and running around with my kids.” For Riff, putting things into perspective helps. He recalled his days as an ER doctor. At Target, even under a tight deadline, Riff asks himself, “What’s the worst that could happen? Nobody is going to die” if a report is late. He also takes 15 minutes each day for quiet reflection.The panel also discussed the importance of developing resilience. Fricchione said stress makes resilience more problematic, since “stress actually removes a main part of resilience, which is connection to family and community.” Stress isolates people at the exact moment when connecting with “people who care about you becomes extraordinarily important,” he noted.Riff added that while people may not be able to change the stimuli that create stress, such as heavy workloads, they can change how they respond to that stimuli. “There’s no way your job will be getting any easier anytime soon,” he said, to rueful nods from the audience, “so you need to change you.”Blendon said he was surprised that so much media attention gets paid to “stressed-out” business executives, when low-income people reported such high levels of daily stress. Schubert added that “having control and agency are important. It can be hard to change conditions of poverty” for individuals, and this perceived lack of control only intensifies stress.From the audience, NPR’s medical and science reporter Richard Knox asked how the medical profession can better address stress. Riff noted that “our training [as doctors] doesn’t provide us with the knowledge, and there’s no pill to prescribe [for stress].”Fricchione concluded with a call to action. “We need to embed into medical analysis [of all patients] a measure of stress and develop a treatment plan based on the research,” he said. “It will take time, but I believe this will flow into medical educationThe Health Burden of Stress: What We Can Do About It For many of us, stress is an omnipresent and frequently overwhelming factor of day-to-day life. As we begin to better understand its toll on our health, The Forum at the Harvard School of Public Health — in connection with a new poll by HSPH, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR — shared the story of stress as perceived by many Americans. What are the biggest sources of stress? How can it affect our health? And what can we do in our homes, workplaces and communities to help us manage stress and to live calmer — and healthier — lives?last_img read more

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first_imgSCOTTISH police are planning extra security for Celtic’s Donegal-based fans when they start travelling to Glasgow tomorrow for the final day of the SPL season on Sunday.Tension is already high following an attack on Neil Lennon at Hearts on Wednesday and the arrest of two bomb suspects.Celtic play Motherwell at Parkhead on Sunday, while Rangers travel to Kilmarnock. Walter Smith’s side are one point ahead of Celtic at the top of the table and must drop points and Celtic must win if the Hoops are to have a chance of winning the title. Rangers are odds-on favourites with the bookies to retain their title.But once again it is matters off the pitch which are making all the headlines.And Scottish police are planning extra patrols along the main routes through the west of Scotland from tomorrow as a large contingent of Celtic and Rangers fans make their way to Glasgow.Security will be stepped up even further after the games and on the routes back to the ferry ports at Stranraer and Cairnryan. Officers don’t want Old Firm fans to clash before or after the games.Up to 7,000 Irish-based Celtic fans will make the trip to Glasgow this weekend, most of them by bus and ferry. Around 500 of them will be from Donegal.Ahead of the weekend, Scotland’s First Minister Alex Salmond has appealed for calm and an end to the sectarianism which has increased in recent months.Neil Lennon’s agent says incidents like this week’s attack by a fan at Tynecastle will not drive the Celtic manager out of the Glasgow club.“I think now it’s getting to the stage where he will sit down in the summer with Celtic and the security and go through the whole scenario of what’s going on,” said Martin Reilly. “Obviously, he is a wee bit shaken by what happened.“But I don’t see them driving him out the door.”A man appeared in private at Edinburgh Sheriff Court charged with breach of the peace and assault aggravated by religious prejudice following the incident during Celtic’s 3-0 win over Hearts.Celtic chief executive Peter Lawwell has called for “vile, sustained and relentless attacks” on Lennon and his club to be addressed by Scottish society. And the Scottish Football Association, the Scottish Premier League and Hearts have begun investigating the security breach.“I know fans can get on the pitch area at certain parts of the game, but to get into the technical area is unbelievable.”On Thursday, Strathclyde Police revealed that they are investigating a suspicious package found at Celtic Park, while two men have been detained by police investigating parcel bombs sent to Lennon.Reilly admitted that these and incidents earlier in the season were having a “horrendous” effect on the former Northern Ireland midfielder’s life, with even his parents being under guard.“He is a very strong character, but it’s getting on now,” said the agent.“These incidents are coming quite frequently now.“He is going to have to sit down and have a right good think about it and go from there, but I’m sure, once he gets a taste of some success, it’ll be a new chapter and he’ll just want to get on with it again.”Reilly blamed certain elements of the media for putting the spotlight on Lennon and “trying to drive him out the door”.“All he wants to do is get on with his job, but there is certain quarters of the media that won’t leave him alone,” he said. “They’ve always got some agenda against him.“They are either obsessed by him or have a personal vendetta against him.“I am not going to glorify who they are, but there are certainly ones out there who constantly write about what he is up to off the park rather than what he is doing on the park as a manager, which has been really successful this season.”Reilly thought that Lennon aroused strong emotions because he was a winner, similar to former Rangers striker Nacho Novo.“He has got the same kind of thing for the Rangers fans as Nacho Novo had to the Celtic fans, because they are good at their job,” said the agent.“People who know Neil as a person know he isn’t the kind of figure that the press are making him out to be.“Neil is a very passionate guy about football especially and about his family and his country, but there is certain people in the media that just want to write things that are probably not true.“There is a rule for Neil Lennon and a rule for everybody else. He has brought the fans back to Celtic in their droves and they are singing his name.“A lot of people say he’s no angel, but he doesn’t bring a lot of things on himself. He does not bring this on himself.”DONEGAL HOOPS FANS WARNED AHEAD OF TRIP TO GLASGOW FOR SPL TITLE DAY was last modified: May 13th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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