May 13, 2021
  • 5:49 pm Comment: Will the government HR policy please stand up?
  • 5:48 pm Training the labour force
  • 5:47 pm EOC wants dads’ rights extended
  • 5:47 pm Flexibility pays off
  • 5:47 pm HR urged to champion racial cause

first_imgDirector Art Jones and Bruce Bouchard, Executive Director of The Paramount Theatre, announced today that the feature-length Rutland-focused documentary, “The Blood in this Town” will be presented in a “Sneak Preview to Benefit the Paramount Theatre” on Saturday, Oct. 23, at 6:30 p.m. There will be two additional “Sneak Previews” at 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24. Proceeds will benefit The Paramount.”The Blood in this Town” is a 95-minute documentary chronicling Rutland’s drive to revitalize itself during America’s deep economic crisis. The film uses the town’s record-breaking Gift-of-Life Marathon blood drive to explore how a struggling, post-industrial town can revive itself from the grassroots up. From initiatives like the Rutland Creative Economy and the creation of a year-round Farmers’ Market to entrepreneurial startups and the building of a world-class trail system in Pine Hill Park, Rutland shows how a community’s determination and true-grit creativity can provide a way forward for thousands of struggling towns across America.”The film shows sides of Rutland that many people may not even realize exist,” said Jones. ‘Rutland, despite some big challenges, has an amazing range of imaginative, energetic people who are not waiting around for change to come to them. More and more, they are uniting, putting political and other differences aside to work together for the good of the town. That’s something this nation as a whole can learn from, and should know about.’Jones added, ‘Parts of the film will surprise, maybe even shock local people. Yet in many ways, Rutland is shattering expectations of what a small town can do. Ultimately it’s a story of spirit and determination.’The documentary was filmed over seven months – from December 2009 to the summer of 2010 – covering the day-long action of last year’s dramatic Gift-Of-Life Marathon, a range of dynamic community initiatives, and day-to-day life in town. The film was crafted from over 52 hours of footage and 40 individual interviews.The Gift-of-Life Marathon, organized by Central Vermont Public Service and WJJR-FM, is more than just a blood drive. While it has twice broken the New England record for single-day blood donations, it is also a rallying point for the greater Rutland Community, a block party focused on community giving and revival. From school children to churches, businesses to non-profits, the community has made the event a central focus of the holiday season, in the process helping to save thousands of lives in the marathon’s seven-year run. The 2010 Gift-of-Life Marathon is gearing up to recapture its New England record, which was broken by a Boston blood drive at Fenway Park on Sept. 11.”We started the film with a focus on the blood drive, but that became an allegory for the larger story of Rutland,” Jones said. “There’s a blueprint for revival talking shape here, and our hope is that ‘The Blood in this Town,’ can help bring Rutland’s drive-to-revitalize to the nation’s attention.’The film was made by Art Jones of Great Jones Productions in New York. Jones is a veteran filmmaker who began his work in documentaries on PBS’s “Frontline” in the 1980s. Since 1991, he has headed Great Jones Productions – writing, directing and producing documentary-based films for a host of educational, cultural and corporate clients, including IBM, Merck, YMCA and Time Warner ‘ thereby creating a funding engine for the development of documentary and narrative films.His three prior theatrical films – “Dodgeball”, “Going Nomad” and “Lustre”, have received nationwide acclaim and release, first playing in the Tribeca, Hamptons, SXSW, and Cinequest Film Festivals. His films have been broadcast on PBS, HBO, the BBC and ARTE.Looking to the future, Jones aims to bring “The Blood in this Town” to a range of national and international film festivals, en route to the eventual goal of theatrical release and national broadcast via outlets such as PBS, the Sundance and Independent Film Channels.The Oct. 23 “Sneak Preview of The Blood in this Town, a Feature-Length Documentary, to Benefit the Paramount Theatre” will include a pre-film cocktail hour (6:30-7:30 p.m.), a short pre-film discussion, the sneak preview (7:45 p.m.) and a talk and Q&A session afterward with Jones. Tickets are $25. Tickets for the Oct. 24 showings at 1:30 and 4 p.m. are $6 for adults and $4 for children.Tickets go on sale, Friday morning Sept. 24, at the Paramount Box Office, at www.paramountlive.org(link is external) or 802 775-0903. The film’s website is www.bloodinthistown.com(link is external).last_img read more

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first_imgIn 2018 a team of researchers drilled the Khumbu glacier and found that the ice was much warmer than expected. The coldest ice that they tested was a full 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the mean annual air temperature. The first official running of Barkley was in 1986 and the field of runners is capped at around 40 each year. Not much about the course is known, but runners must complete five 20-mile loops with a total elevation gain of 60,000 feet in 60 hours. Since its inception, only 15 runners have finished the race. Tiny poisonous toads are taking over neighborhoods in Florida As temperatures across the globe continue to rise, melting glaciers on Mount Everest are exposing the bodies of climbers who died attempting to summit the mountain. Since the first climber set out to reach the peak in 1922, more than 300 have died trying to scale the highest mountain in the world. In recent years, most of the dead bodies have been exposed at Khumbu icefall, a notoriously difficult part of the climb, and in the final camp area. Last year at camp one, the hand of a dead climber appeared above the ground. It can cost up to $80,000 to remove a dead body from the mountain. There wasn’t a single finisher in this year’s Barkley Marathonscenter_img The residents of Palm Beach Garden, Florida weren’t sure what to think when countless numbers of baby cane toads began appearing in their yards, pools and homes two weeks ago. Cane toads are an invasive species introduced to Florida in the 1930’s for the purpose of killing the beetles that feed on Florida’s sugarcane crop. When attacked, adult cane toads shoot a toxin out of their backs that is strong enough to kill a dog. The invaders in this situation are baby cane toads and their toxin isn’t strong enough to cause real harm. Still, the toads have arrived in swarms, hopping over fences and entering homes and swimming pools en masse. The reason for the invasion in the Palm Beach Garden neighborhood appears to be an undisturbed lake. Because there was nothing to bother the toad eggs and tadpoles in the lake nearly all of them hatched and grew, hopping their way into Palm Beach Garden in one headline-making wave. The Barkley Marathons, held each year in the hills of Wartburg, Tennessee, is considered one of the hardest ultra marathons in the world. Here’s proof: the race took place again last weekend and for the second year in a row, despite a field that included elite runners, no one finished the race within the 60-hour window. Six participants finished the “Fun Run,” completing three loops of the course. Melting glaciers are exposing the bodies of climbers who died on Mount Everestlast_img read more

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first_imgTopics : Researchers also noted the air conditioning simply recirculated the air inside the bus, which likely contributed to spreading of the virus.”The investigations suggest that, in closed environments with air recirculation, SARS-CoV-2 is a highly transmissible pathogen,” they wrote, referring to the name of the virus.”Our finding of potential airborne transmission has important public health significance.”Their study, which includes a diagram showing where each infected passenger sat, adds to the evidence of airborne transmission, including research into how the virus spread between diners’ tables at a restaurant in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou. Researchers believe a passenger, whose gender was not identified, was likely patient zero because the person had been in contact with people from Wuhan, the city where the contagion emerged late last year.The scientists managed to map out where the other passengers sat, and also test them for the virus, with 23 of 68 passengers subsequently confirmed as infected on the same bus.What is notable is that the sickness infected people in the front and back of the bus, outside the perimeter of 1-2 meters (three-six feet) that authorities and experts say infectious droplets can travel.On top of that, the sick passenger was not yet showing symptoms of the disease, such as a cough, when the group made their trip to a religious event.center_img A person on a poorly ventilated Chinese bus infected nearly two-dozen other passengers with coronavirus even though many weren’t sitting close by, according to research published on Tuesday that offers fresh evidence the disease can spread in the air.Health authorities had initially discounted the possibility that simply breathing could send infectious micro-droplets into the air, but did a U-turn as experts piled on pressure and evidence mounted.The article published Tuesday in JAMA Internal Medicine probes the threat of airborne infection by taking a close look at passengers who made a 50-minute trip to a Buddhist event in the eastern Chinese city of Ningbo aboard two buses in January before face masks became routine against the virus.last_img read more

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