June 25, 2021
  • 5:29 am Rugby book Review – Once We Were Lions
  • 5:28 am Crusaders missing All Blacks trio
  • 5:27 am Rugby Rant: Abusive tweets have no place in rugby
  • 5:25 am Who should be in and out of the England squad for the Autumn Tests?
  • 7:30 am Committee reaffirms mandatory denominational health plan

first_imgOver the last few months, we have seen the COVID-19 pandemic radically reshape lives and livelihoods. People across the world have transitioned to remote work and education arrangements, increasing our reliance on digital technologies. In the education sector, students and teachers have had to quickly adapt to new models of learning and teaching from remote settings, a transition that has highlighted the importance of digital skilling and universal access to technology. At this moment of accelerated change, we at Dell Technologies remain committed to the task of transforming education through technology and addressing the need for greater digital access across communities and geographies.As Chair of the Governing Board at the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, I have been truly impressed with the proactive steps taken by policymakers and educators over the past few months to introduce online classes and ICT tools to minimize disruptions to students’ education and help teachers adapt to technology-driven classrooms. For instance, the European Schoolnet has released a wide range of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and curated online teaching materials to support teachers in conducting classes remotely. At the same time, this pandemic has exposed the uneven landscape of digital resources and competencies across many regions, which hinders students’ and teachers’ ability to transition to virtual arrangements. According to the European Commission’s Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI), 42% of European citizens and 37% of people in the labor force lack sufficient digital skills. Meeting the current challenges of our time will require new collaboration across government, academia, and the private sector to modernize technology infrastructure for education and design student-centric learning models that develop the future readiness of students.This theme is the primary focus underpinning Dell Technologies’ upcoming PolicyHack that will be held in association with STEM Alliance – an organization that brings together the European Ministries of Education with industry partners to promote STEM subjects across all levels of education. This August, Dell Technologies PolicyHack and STEM Alliance have launched a competition for teachers across Europe to submit policy recommendations on how ICT tools can be used to solve STEM education challenges faced at the local and regional levels. Our expert panel of judges will carefully select four groups of winning contestants, who will then each form a competition team with representatives from government, academia, and industry. These four teams will proceed to a hackathon held in November alongside the annual “Back to School Campaign” organized by STEM Alliance, which brings together schools, universities, libraries, and other academic institutions to celebrate studies and careers in STEM.The teams will be challenged to come up with innovative ICT solutions that address four of the most pressing challenges faced in today’s classrooms: cultivating inclusion in classrooms, integrating constructivist and personalized teaching approaches, supporting inquiry-based learning, and building lifelong learning skills. Through this initiative, we hope to support collaboration among diverse perspectives and stakeholders while encouraging new ways of using ICT tools to enhance learning content and methodologies, build digital competencies, and encourage diversity in classrooms.Dell Technologies believes in digital skilling and inclusion as critical factors toward empowering our future workforce, bridging societal divides, and providing opportunities for underrepresented communities. These extraordinary times underscore the importance of fostering digital skills among students and empowering educators to teach in new ways that promote digital literacy. Looking ahead, Dell Technologies will be committed to acting on the lessons learned from this rise in virtual education and work with stakeholders to leverage digital transformation and emerging technologies to help citizens thrive in an increasingly digital world.last_img read more

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first_imgRelatedPosts Pirlo not out to copy anyone after Juventus’ comfortable opening win EPL: Gunners survive West Ham scare EPL: Gunners gun for West Ham scalp Pep Guardiola is set to appoint his former mentor Juanma Lillo as his assistant coach at Manchester City, reports in the Spanish media on Friday indicated.Manchester City did not replace Mikel Arteta when he left his role as Guardiola’s assistant to become Arsenal manager last December. Now, Spanish newspapers Marca and AS said Guardiola was set to hire Lillo, who recently left Chinese Super League side Qingdao Huanghai.The 54-year-old Lillo has been a coach for 35 years, working as an assistant to Jorge Sampaoli with Sevilla and the Chile national team.He has had limited success in a number of first team coaching roles at several clubs, including Real Sociedad, Almeria and Atletico Nacional.In 2005, he signed Guardiola for Mexican side Dorados Sinaloa.“Guardiola is like a son to me,” said Lillo in a 2012 interview with FIFA, explaining that the former FC Barcelona midfielder went to see him after Lillo’s Real Oviedo side had been beaten 4-2 by Barca. “He told me that he liked how my team played a lot and wanted to stay in touch. What began as a professional relationship developed into something much more.”Reuters/NAN.Tags: Juanma LilloManchester CityMikel ArtetaPep GuardiolaQingdao Huanghailast_img read more

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first_img Comments No. 25 Syracuse (7-2) relied on a Tyus Battle-led surge to comeback and beat Georgetown last Saturday and win its fifth-straight. Coming to the Carrier Dome on Saturday at noon is another team on a five-game winning streak: Old Dominion (7-3). The Monarchs feature two 7-footers and two dynamic senior guards.Here’s what to expect when Syracuse tips with Old Dominion on Saturday.All-time series: Syracuse leads, 2-1Last time they played: Syracuse beat Old Dominion on Jan. 30, 1981, 71-58, in the Carrier Dome. It was the second meeting in a two-year span. The Orange were led by Danny Schayes, the son of NBA Hall of Famer Dolph Schayes and a graduate of Jamesville-Dewitt (New York) High School, who tallied 17 points on the day.The Old Dominion report: The Monarchs make their mark on the defensive end of the floor. They have a top-30 defense in the country, per Kenpom.com, and they’ve held opponents to the second lowest 2-point field goal percentage in the country. Much of its defense stems from quality rim protection, which starts with 7-foot sophomore Dajour Dickens, who averages 1.8 blocks per game. The Monarchs also utilize 7-foot-1 senior Elbert Robinson III inside, as he and Dickens have split starts at center this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe defensive approach extends to on-ball pressure from ODU’s two star guards: Ahmad Caver and B.J. Stith, who both average more than a steal per game. The Monarchs have only allowed one of their 10 opponents to clear the 70-point mark this seasonCaver plays more than 90 percent of the Monarchs’ minutes and leads the team in both scoring and assists with 18.5 points and 5.1 assists per game. Stith is a close second in scoring, at 18 points per game, and the 6-foot-5 swingman leads ODU in rebounding, at 8.8 per game. Both Caver and Stith have knocked down more than 20 threes this season, with Stith shooting the ball above 40 percent from beyond the arc.How Syracuse beats Old Dominion: Caver has scored double figures in every game this season, and Stith has scored double figures in all but one. The two Monarchs stars will get their opportunities. For Syracuse to beat a quality mid-major opponent, it’ll have to win the battle inside. Between Dickens and Robinson, ODU brings more size to a matchup with Syracuse. SU head coach Jim Boeheim has repeatedly criticized SU’s center play; it’ll have to be better on Saturday.If the Orange can shore up the inside, it’ll come down to scoring against a quality Old Dominion defense. In the Monarch’s win on Nov. 28 against VCU, Old Dominion played an aggressive, half court man-to-man. The Orange offense remained stagnant, as it has much of the season, in the first half against Georgetown last Saturday, mustering only 22 points in 20 minutes. For SU to take advantage of the pressure that characterizes the ODU defense, the Orange will need to create movement like they did in the second half against the Hoyas.Stat to know: 38.2 – The percentage that Old Dominion has held its opponents to shooting from inside the arc, per Kenpom.comKenPom odds: Syracuse is given an 83 percent chance to win, by a projected 67-56 scorePlayer to watch: Ahmad Caver, guard, No. 4Old Dominion’s offensive show runs through Caver. He leads the Monarchs in scoring and assists, including 2.2 made 3-pointers per game. The senior guard from Atlanta also heads the perimeter defense for ODU, snatching 1.7 steals per game. The Monarchs play at one of the country’s slowest paces, with a possession length 1.7 seconds longer on average than Syracuse’s. It’ll be all on Caver to create opportunities in late shot clock situations for the Monarchs, either with his shot or via the pass. If he has success as time winds down, Old Dominion can hang around with the Orange. Published on December 14, 2018 at 12:07 pm Contact Billy: [email protected] | @Wheyen3center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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first_imgGREENSBORO, N.C. — Amy Ketterman made a deal with her son Braxton so the duo could attend the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. Braxton, 11, grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina with his mom and loved Florida State. He always had since he watched FSU’s mascot duo of Osceola and Renegade for the first time. But anxiety had kept him out of class recently, Ketterman, 46, said. So, she presented Braxton an opportunity: Attend school for three days and he’d earn tickets to every ACC tournament game. He eagerly waited to find out FSU’s opponent but readied for Wednesday night’s contest between North Carolina and Syracuse in the meantime. But as they entered the Greensboro Coliseum around 7:45 p.m., Ketterman noticed a news alert. The ACC would prevent fans from attending games starting March 12. The Seminoles were slated to play their first game at 9 p.m. on the 12th. Braxton found solace in a cup of chocolate Dippin’ Dots. The most recent restriction amid the coronavirus pandemic stormed through the arena when an ACC spokesperson sent a press release at 7:58 p.m., limiting upcoming tournament games to just “essential staff and limited family attendance.” More restrictions built on the NCAA’s late afternoon one that prohibited fans from attending NCAA Tournament games. President Donald Trump barred European flights for 30 days. The NBA suspended its season. Greensboro — a self-branded “Tournament Town” — quickly resembled every other city in America hosting a conference tournament: Enhanced safety measures, extra Centers for Disease Control advisory postings and more hand sanitizer stations.  AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLoading…Reactions trickled through the concourse, varying from concerned to anger. Confusion reigned above all else. Fans brought up their phones texting, calling and scrambling for what to do next. “We’re outta business,” Dan Smith, a Miami fan, said to his friend Maxine Cooper. “If you wanna know the truth, I’m pissed.” Preparation started on March 10th. Workers from Staffing Logistics, a local temp agency, arrived at the Coliseum around 5 p.m. when a supervisor directed them to refill hand sanitizer receptacles lining the concourse. They carried boxes and emptied jugs into each one, finishing about an hour into Pittsburgh and Wake Forest’s first round matchup. Some workers tasked with wiping down common surfaces during Wednesday’s game didn’t know about the ACC’s ruling as Notre Dame beat Boston College. One carried extra gloves in his back pocket. North Carolina has eight reported coronavirus cases, Governor Roy Moore announced earlier in the day, but none in Guilford County as of Wednesday. Some workers immediately worried about their paychecks.“If there are no fans here, we won’t be here. The players don’t eat,” one worker said. “… If we can’t come in, I’m pretty sure that messes up our money.”MORE COVERAGE: NCAA cancels all postseason championship events in response to coronavirusA look the chaotic 2 hours that led to end of ACC tournamentACC cancels men’s basketball tournament amid spread of coronavirusInside the confusion at the ACC tournament amid coronavirus restrictionsACC suspends spring sports amid coronavirusFans shared similar concerns and checked on hotel or flight cancellations. Smith, 79, flew to the event from Tucson, Arizona. Cooper, 83, drove from her home in Jacksonville, Florida. Cooper, a UM-alum, said she and Smith attended eight of the last nine ACC tournaments. They booked a room in the TownePlace Suites until Sunday but hope for refunds from the games they’d miss.“If we had known earlier, we could’ve checked out,” Cooper said. “…We were here to see basketball.” So was Will Louis, 53, a North Carolina fan that had waited for four years to see the ACC gauntlet return to his hometown. Earlier in the day, he had heard the NCAA’s ruling to play Tournament games with no fans and grew upset about his void tickets to the first round of the Big Dance. He, too, had questions about reimbursement, but there was no one to answer them. The unease leaked into the gameday operations. As Syracuse and North Carolina left the court at halftime, ACC officials jogged on with disinfectant wipes, scrubbing down chairs. When a halftime game led to young children sitting on the black leather cushions on SU’s bench, another official walked over. “Wipe them all down again,” she said. “They sat in one but they touched two (each).”Bert Settla, a retired healthcare worker from Chicago, expected the conference’s decision. A Louisville fan, he flew in on Tuesday afternoon, constantly checking developments on the ACC’s website on ESPN. During the commute, he said a man behind him coughed without covering his mouth, causing Settla, 64, to move to another seat on the “half-full” flight. In the concourse as SU and UNC prepped, Settla rubbed some hand sanitizer onto his hands from the travel-size bottle he keeps in his pocket. He envisioned his night ending with a call to United Airlines to book a new flight. A few feet away from him, two fans recognized each other. They extended their arms but bumped elbows as their greeting. Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 12, 2020 at 7:47 am Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nick_a_alvarezcenter_img Commentslast_img read more

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