June 16, 2021
  • 7:06 am Conrad N Hilton Humanitarian Prize offers $1 million
  • 7:06 am ‘Inconspicuous consumption’ – charity shop research
  • 7:04 am Senior lawyer quits to set up HIV charity
  • 7:04 am Royal Consulting returns
  • 7:04 am TV presenter cleared of charity-plugs-for-cash allegations

first_imgKenny Jackett is unsure whether Wolves midfielder Karl Henry will join QPR.West London Sport reported last week that Rangers are interested in the 30-year-old, who has three years of his contract at Molineux left to run.Former R’s assistant boss Jackett, recently installed as Wolves manager, is overhauling his squad and is keen for several players to move on.QPR have also been offered the chance to sign Jamie O’Hara, who played under Rangers boss Harry Redknapp at Tottenham and is another player Wolves have made available.“Karl Henry had some conversations with QPR. I don’t think it’s come to a head but he’s been there,” the Birmingham Mail quote Jackett as saying.“At present he is still a Wolves player. QPR are interested in him and no deal has been done.”See also:Wolves’ Henry could be QPR’s next 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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first_img12 April 2012 For 48-year-old Nokwanda Sotyantya, a member of a local recycling cooperative from the Imizamo Yethu informal settlement outside Cape Town, South Africa’s move towards a “green” economy has turned her life around. Sotyantya sits among heaps of garbage and patiently sorts through it, separating cardboard, plastic, glass, paper and metal, piece by piece. The recycled piles of trash are then weighed and sold to packaging manufacturers in South Africa that reuse the materials to create new products.Sotyantya belongs to the country’s first group of small business entrepreneurs who have benefited from the government’s move towards a green economy. It is a strategy aimed at creating environmental sustainability, social equity, and economic growth; the government wants to create 300 000 jobs within a decade in this sector.Previously unemployed and struggling to survive, Sotyantya says she now earns an average of R2 000 (US$250) a month from her work – enough to care for herself and her four children.“The more people become aware of the benefits of recycling, the more rubbish gets dropped off at the Hout Bay waste centre. For me, that translates into more money,” Sotyantya explains.Hout Bay Recycling Co-op, social incubator ThriveThe Hout Bay Recycling Co-op to which she belongs is based at the municipal waste drop-off site in Hout Bay. Here Sotyantya and other members of the cooperative sort and sell the recycled material.Her cooperative of six formerly jobless, poverty-stricken men and women currently recycles 25 tonnes of waste each month. And this number is slowly increasing.The cooperative received a boost when Thrive, a social enterprise incubator that helps green start-ups to become viable, competitive businesses, decided to help the cooperative improve its business strategy and management expertise.“We focus on creating jobs that help to minimise waste, increase renewable sources, protect and restore local biodiversity, reduce energy and water demands and create a local food network,” explains Thrive managing director Iming Lin.It is much more than developing traditional business models, she adds; it is about incorporating social, environmental and economic benefits.UN sustainable development awardAlthough it has only been operating since July 2011, Thrive’s work has not gone unnoticed. The SEED Initiative of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) acknowledged the organisation’s work by selecting it for one of its 2011 sustainable development awards that are annually presented to 35 African grassroots entrepreneurs in the green economy.“On this continent, companies and countries, from small communities to heads of state, are suddenly realising the importance of the green economy,” says UNEP spokesperson Nick Nuttall.Economic development and environmental and social sustainability cannot operate in isolation, he says.“Going green doesn’t mean it’s nice and fluffy. There are some hard economic figures behind it, too.” Creating a green economy is no longer an option, but a requirement, Nuttall says.“We are living in a world of seven-billion people increasing to over nine-billion by 2050. If we don’t change the way we consume goods and services and think about the environmental limits, then we’re in trouble.“But it’s a world of opportunity too,” Nuttal says, adding, “there are more and more examples of small businesses solving big problems and creating livelihoods.”Green Economic AccordIt is an opportunity that the South African government wants to seize over the next few years. In November, it signed a Green Economic Accord that stipulates active national investment in the green economy.“The green economy can create large numbers of jobs, provide a spur for industrialisation and help create a sustainable future for this and the next generations,” said Minister of Economic Development Ebrahim Patel after the accord was announced.The agreement is part of a plan to shift towards a lower carbon-intensity economy, while creating jobs and promoting industrial development.But government alone cannot manage and fund South Africa’s transition to a green economy, says Patel. The business sector, trade unions and civil society organisations must also play a role.That is why organisations like Thrive have started talking to and collaborating with different government departments, such as environmental affairs, trade and industry, solid waste or public works, to jointly develop ways of giving the local green economy a jolt.‘Social enterprises are a growing model’“Social enterprises are a growing model. We want to develop donor-independent, viable, scalable business models that link the economy and the environment and that can be rolled out in multiple communities or even nationally,” says Lin.“Government has been very supportive of what we’re doing.”Apart from supporting the recycling cooperative, Thrive is trying to get a number of other innovative green economy businesses off the ground.One of them is TrashBack, a bicycle recycling collection scheme that picks up re-usable material from restaurants, businesses and residential housing complexes, which are currently not serviced by the municipality. For every eight clients – or 4 800kg of garbage – TrashBack can create one full-time job, says Lin.“We want to show people how it all links into each other: waste, water, food, jobs and better livelihoods for all,” says Lin.“We can’t afford not to have a green economy.”Sapalast_img read more

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first_imgmike melanson Before you go freaking out, Facebook’s new facial recognition feature isn’t there quite yet – your latest photobomb won’t result in the victims sending you angry Facebook messages as the service identifies your snarling mug in the background. For now, facial recognition simply means recognizing that a face is present and leaving it at that. The feature, just added last night, hopes to make the tagging process quicker and simpler, as part of a larger effort on Facebook’s part to improve the entire photo uploading, browsing and tagging process.According to Facebook, more than 100 million photos are uploaded daily – a statistic that looks to rival that of YouTube’s 24 hours of video uploaded every minute. In addition to the sheer volume, there is barely a person on the social network that hasn’t been part of the photo uploading process, with 99% of the more than 400 million users having uploaded at least one photo. What Facebook’s new product manager for photos Sam Odio is trying to point out here in his blog post is that uploading photos is massively popular and in need of some streamlining, likely to the benefit of Facebook’s servers. Odio was the founder of Divvyshot, the company behind the facial recognition technology that was acquired by Facebook two months ago. For now, facial recognition will identifiy that a face is present in an uploaded photo, asking the user “Whose face is this?” According to Facebook, the feature is in limited testing, so you may not see it yet, but this and more will be coming for all soon. “Stay tuned,” Odio writes, “for future posts about other work on browsing, uploading and tagging.”We’re hoping this does help to clearly tag photos, rather than ending up with names popping up between two people when you mouse over their rubbing elbows.While others, such as Endgadget’s Tim Stevens, lament that the facial recognition won’t go as far as saying who’s face the software is seeing, we have to say we’re glad Facebook hasn’t taken this leap. And surely, when they do, we’ll see a privacy setting for whether or not we want our face to be identified on any and every photo uploaded to its service, right? Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#Facebook#news#NYT#web center_img A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoslast_img read more

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first_imgBy: David Lee Sexton, Jr.What is the DVBIC?The Defense and Veteran Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) was founded by Congress in 1992 to serve as the pathway of care manager for traumatic brain injury (TBI) within the Military Health System (MHS). The center provides quality care for individuals ranging from initial injury to reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families to reduce the impact of mild to severe TBI.A Head for the FutureOne of the initiatives of the DVBIC is “A Head for the Future”, which provides resources to the military community prevent, recognize, and recover from TBI. The website’s page on prevention details ways in which individuals can protect themselves from TBI during non-combat situations, including details on helmet safety. Recognize describes what TBI is and provides details on common causes, signs and symptoms, and possible effects on mental health. Finally, Recover presents information on the rehabilitation and treatment process for TBI.TBI ChampionsIn addition to providing information on prevention, recognition, and treatment, “A Head for the Future” hosts several video testimonials of individuals who have experienced TBI, called “TBI Champion Stories”. These videos provide glimpses into the lives of a variety of people just like us who have suffered TBI themselves or cared for someone with TBI. These videos alone are a valuable resource because they provide support and hope for individuals going through similar battles, and when taken together they provide a resounding message: you are not alone.Want to Learn More?To learn more about traumatic brain injury and its effects on families, please take some time to watch the MFLN Family Development Team’s free, archived webinar presented by Heidi Knock, Psy.D., Staff Psychologist at Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Knock provides individual, marital, and group psychotherapy to veterans and their families. She also treats individuals on the polytrauma unit and the inpatient rehabilitation unit who have a combination of complex mental and physical health issues, such as traumatic brain injury, chronic pain, amputation, and posttraumatic stress disorder.The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development concentration on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.  You can also listen to our Anchored. podcast series via iTunes and our website.last_img read more

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