May 16, 2021
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Rabat – Morocco’s Minister of Education Said Amzazi spoke about his strategy to reform Morocco’s education system and vocational training.Amzazi recognized the deficiencies in the job market, emphasizing that more than 600 engineers leave the country to look for better opportunities abroad every year.Amzazi, however, argued that brain drain is an “international phenomenon.” He added that it is the result of graduate students desire to look for more “favorable working conditions.” Read Also:Amzazi Proposes a Full Menu of Programs to Support EducationThe official said that educated people also leave because of technological transformations and the appeal of international laboratories. He acknowledged that Morocco does not provide incentives to attract educated Moroccans across the world.He noted that if Moroccan researchers return to Morocco from Europe, they start at the lowest administrative rank, an unacceptable demotion for university researchers.Amzazi emphasized the importance of creating new positions to ensure that returning Moroccans maintain their higher levels in Moroccan universities and institutes if they decide to return.Distrust and unemployment cause emigrationIn an October 2018 speech, King Mohammed VI urged the government to create more job opportunities for Moroccan youth.Regarding brain drain, the King said,  “There are tempting incentives which induce some students to remain abroad after completing their studies.”A recent Gallup report showed that Morocco would lose 19 percent of its adult population and 29 percent of its 15 to 19-year-olds if migration were free.Read Also: How to Turn the Moroccan Brain Drain into a Brain GainAnother survey from Moroccan marketing agency Sunergia showed that the most common reasons that Moroccans give for emigrating are “lack of trust in the Moroccan government” and “the high unemployment rate.”A 2018 report from ReKrute showed that 91 percent of Moroccan professionals aged 35 and below are tempted to move abroad in search of better work conditions and quality of life, which includes health care and comfort.Morocco’s High Commission for Planning (HCP) said in November 2018 that theunemployment rate fell slightly from 10.6 percent to 10 percent between the third quarters of 2017 and 2018.Will vocational training solve the problem?The government now is attempting to increase employment by introducing vocational training programs under the instructions of King Mohammed VI.The monarch also ordered the government to create a committee to give specific solutions to curb youth unemployment.The minister said that his department continues to implement a strategic vision for education in training.Read Also: Official: 63% of Students with Vocational Training Find Jobs Easily“The next phase will be characterized by the implementation of major structural reform and the strengthening of human resources engagement.”After his appointment as minister of education, Amzazi announced a reform proposal for Moroccan education and vocational training centers.Amzazi also seeks to reduce the rate of school dropouts from 6 percent in rural primary schools to 1 percent by 2024-2025.The minister also promised a decrease in the rate of dropouts in secondary schools from 12 to 3 percent, in both rural and urban areas, by the 2024-2025 school year. read more

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first_imgComedians have told how anti-Brexit jokes are harming their careers as audiences outside of London walk out in offence.A number of comedians have described scripting their take on Britain leaving the European Union for Left-wing audiences in London, only to face unamused audiences when they take their acts out to the rest of the country.Marcus Brigstocke, who has been touring the country with a set that includes 20 minutes of material on Brexit, said members of the audience had been walking out “every night” in anger.He said that a number of his fans were unlikely to return to his shows in future, as a result of the jokes.”People have been angry; people have walked out of shows and people have booed. “A lot of the people that I think of as my audience will not be back – they won’t come again – they’re that angry,” he told BBC Radio 4. However a spokeswoman for comedian Stewart Lee, who has 20 minutes of anti-Brexit material at the start of his show, said “his career has only been strengthened by Brexit”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Marcus BrigstockeCredit:Rex Features Marcus Brigstocke Aaron Brown, editor of the British Comedy Guide, said: “I consume a lot of comedy – mostly TV, also some live – and would say the comedy world’s reaction has been almost exclusively negative. “Many jokes essentially paraphrase as ‘shooting ourselves in the foot’, and the rest rely on lazily branding 52 per cent of the voters as racist. center_img Stewart LeeCredit:Colin Hutton  Stewart Lee “One would have hoped comedians would be able to find comic mileage in their evident disengagement from half of the public, but there instead seems to be little to no such acceptance and analysis of the referendum result, instead merely anger and lashing out at stupid people making the wrong decision, as they see it.”As far as audience reaction goes, it tends to be fairly warm with television studio audiences as most such recordings take place in the resolutely pro-remain London, but in the rest of the country – England and Wales, at very least – one can only begin to imagine how alienated and offended some audiences must feel.” Writing on Facebook, Brigstocke said he did not want to turn his audience off, but said: “For the first time ever on tour I have people walking out every night ‑ not hordes, but some. That’s unsettling. “I have never before dealt with a subject as divisive and upsetting (including passionate criticisms of religion etc). It’s a challenge I would usually enjoy but (perhaps because I’m not doing it well enough) it is proving to be a nightmare.”It seems that for the most part Brexit is not just the hideous social and political turn we have taken as a country but is also comedic poison.”last_img read more

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