May 12, 2021
  • 6:00 am The pattern of growth and translocation of photosynthate in a tundra moss, Polytrichum alpinum
  • 5:59 am Aspects of the biology of Antarctomysis maxima (Crustacea: Mysidacea)
  • 5:58 am Belemnite battlefields
  • 5:54 am Middle Jurassic air fall tuff in the sedimentary Latady Formation, eastern Ellsworth Land
  • 5:53 am Concentration, molecular weight distribution and neutral sugar composition of DOC in maritime Antarctic lakes of differing trophic status

first_img But teachers and students didn’t like so much money and attention being given to the football program, when it’s needed in other areas.One Twitter thread that got a ton of notice involved an LSU professor complaining of having to clean his office with a vacuum he bought himself. This prompted a stern response from LSU quarterback Joe Burrow.Another student pointed to the school library looking like a mess due to donations being given to football over academics.This is our library: https://t.co/ZvqgNa5L8o pic.twitter.com/xHsV5qf5wO— Cat Mckinney (@catcmckinney) July 22, 2019It’s a controversial topic with the discussion often being held at many schools at all levels of education.One thing that isn’t in dispute though is just how darn gorgeous the new LSU football facility is. LSU cheerleaders run around the field with flags.BATON ROUGE, LA – NOVEMBER 13: Members of the Louisiana State University Tigers cheerleaders celebrate after a touchdown during the game against the University of Louisiana-Monroe Warhawks at Tiger Stadium on November 13, 2010 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Tigers defeated the Warhawks 51-0. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)The new LSU football facility that was unveiled earlier this week attracted a lot of attention. But while most of that attention was directed at how beautiful the facilities were, others criticized it, saying the money (roughly $28 million in donations) could’ve been used better elsewhere (notably: academics).In response to the backlash, LSU revealed that it has done more than just upgrade the football facility. The school announced that renovations have come to several academic buildings as well.LSU is proud of the renovated football operations center, and we are equally proud of academic and student buildings we have recently renovated: Patrick F. Taylor Engineering facility, Ogden Honors College, Business Education Complex and Nicholson Gateway. LSU revealed a $28 million football facility over the weekend. The LSU football came equipped with sleeping pods, an executive chef, special lighting, and countless amenities.LSU is proud of the renovated football operations center, and we are equally proud of academic and student buildings we have recently renovated: Patrick F. Taylor Engineering facility, Ogden Honors College, Business Education Complex and Nicholson Gateway. https://t.co/7IFlqhx6P4 pic.twitter.com/bQeLgMABhZ— LSU (@LSU) July 24, 2019last_img read more

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first_imgI’ve never been better: Jofra Archer ahead of Ashes debutEngland (ENG) vs Australia (AUS), Ashes 2019, 2nd Test: “I’m probably more ready than I have ever been. I bowled 50 overs in one game for Sussex which I think was past the overs they told me to bowl, it was good practice,” Jofra Archer said as he looks poised to make his test debut in the second Ashes test.advertisement Reuters LondonAugust 12, 2019UPDATED: August 12, 2019 21:49 IST England (ENG) vs Australia (AUS), 2nd ODI, Ashes 2019: England’s Jofra Archer looks on, during a nets sessionHIGHLIGHTSEngland fast bowler Jofra Archer included in England’s 12 in the absence of record wicket taker James AndersonDon’t expect any miracles, I can only come in and do what I can and give my best, said Archer ahead of his debutAustralia lead the Ashes 1-0 after their 251-run win at EdgbastonEngland fast bowler Jofra Archer says he has fully recovered from a side strain and is raring to go as he looks poised to make his test debut in the second Ashes test against Australia at Lord’s on Wednesday.Archer, who missed the first test after picking up his injury during England’s World Cup triumph last month, proved his fitness when he took six wickets and scored a century for county side Sussex’s second XI last week.The 24-year-old was included in England’s 12 in the absence of record wicket taker James Anderson, who bowled only four overs in the first test at Edgbaston before injuring his calf again.”I’m probably more ready than I have ever been. I bowled 50 overs in one game for Sussex which I think was past the overs they told me to bowl, it was good practice,” Archer told reporters.”(My fitness) has never been better. (The side strain) just needed to settle and we couldn’t get that gap in the World Cup. After that, it settled in a matter of days.”Don’t expect any miracles, I can only come in and do what I can and give my best. I can’t work miracles but I will try to.”Australia coach Justin Langer had said the key to dealing with Archer, England’s leading wicket-taker at the World Cup with 20 victims, was to “keep wearing him down” and make him bowl more spells.”I think Justin Langer has another think coming,” Barbados-born Archer added. “I’ve played a lot more red-ball cricket than I have white-ball cricket.advertisement”I do think it’s my preferred format anyway. I personally believe in test cricket you get a lot more opportunities to redeem yourself.”If it’s 50 overs, when you don’t have a good 10-overs, that’s it. You have ample chances do it in red-ball games. Test cricket is pretty much the same as first-class — know what your strengths are and stick to them.”Australia lead the Ashes 1-0 after their 251-run win at Edgbaston.Also Read | Ashes: Justin Langer expects flat and dry wicket at Lord’s in 2nd TestAlso see:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byNitin Kumar Tags :Follow Jofra ArcherFollow Ashes 2019Follow England VS AustraliaFollow 2nd testFollow Eng vs AUSlast_img read more

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Canada has a rich history of innovation, but in the next few decades, powerful technological forces will transform the global economy. Large multinational companies have jumped out to a headstart in the race to succeed, and Canada runs the risk of falling behind. At stake is nothing less than our prosperity and economic well-being. The Financial Post set out explore what is needed for businesses to flourish and grow. You can find all of our coverage here.Shortly after Amazon picked New York to host half of its HQ2, an architect’s group published a concept drawing of a giant fulfillment centre carving through the Manhattan skyline. Purposely provocative, the image carried a clear message: The city would be good for Amazon, but would Amazon be good for the city?A similar question is being asked here in Toronto following an influx of global tech corporations that includes Uber, Samsung, LG, Intel, Microsoft and Alphabet. The only sensible response is that of course such massive inward investment — $1.4 billion in September alone — will be good for Toronto. It will directly create hundreds of well-paying jobs and also provide a substantial boost to our homegrown tech companies.Some have voiced concerns that the arrival of deep-pocketed U.S. corporations will price our own startups out of the market for top talent, thereby slowing their growth and confining us to branch-plant operations for foreign companies. Others have painted these companies as a new generation of corporate raiders, who will do a smash-and-grab for our intellectual property. Innovation Nation: How technology is reshaping the insurance industry A robot in every factory: The $230-million bid to help automate Ontario’s manufacturing sector Ottawa ‘bending over backward’ for foreign tech giants at the expense of homegrown stars, insiders say The mistaken assumption underlying these worries is that innovation is a zero-sum game — that an engineer employed by Samsung or Google is irredeemably lost to the startup ecosystem. In reality, there are countless examples of workers who cycle through the corporate world, then go on to establish their own companies with upgraded skills and more experience: I was one of those people.You see, talent is “borderless.” The best engineers and entrepreneurs will go wherever they need to go, find the best possible opportunities to build their skills, experience and ventures. And as always, the best always want to work with the best, build with the best and learn from the best. The arrival of big-name companies is a signal to the market that global companies can be built in Toronto. That will draw more talented workers and investors, particularly as competitors like the U.S. and U.K. become less welcoming to immigrants.Yes, we need to be vigilant that we have safeguards in place for our data and intellectual property. But Toronto’s tech sector is having a moment on the world stage and we need to use it — not work against it — to accelerate the growth of made-in-Canada ventures. To do this, we need to do three things:Leverage the arrival of big tech companies Toronto’s tech sector is connected and collaborative like few others. The best way to ensure that corporates bring more to this ecosystem than they take from it is by forging partnerships with them. Venture arms of big tech companies can be an important source of capital — Salesforce, for instance, is investing US$100 million in Canadian startups. They can also be vital customers and partners, enabling new technologies to be rapidly scaled on their platforms. We are already seeing the power of this approach in the financial industry, where nimble fintech startups are growing fast by building white-label technologies that integrate into the systems of large financial institutions around the world.Connect ventures to sources of strategic global capitalThe arrival of big-name tech companies has put Toronto firmly on the radar of investors. That will help close our venture capital gap with the U.S. — our ventures raise about half as much capital as theirs. But we also need to focus on the quality of that capital, especially as we are likely heading into choppier waters for the global economy. Our companies are export-driven, so we need investors who are internationally connected and can help them enter new markets. As well as continuing to draw global venture capitalists here, we should explore ways to make it easier for Canada’s enormous pension funds to invest in tech ventures while meeting their fiduciary responsibilities. Our pension funds are among the world’s smartest investors and bringing more of their talent and financial firepower to bear could rapidly accelerate growth of our innovative companies.Focus on key sectors where we have strategic advantageCanada’s inclusive approach to innovation is serving us well, but we have to be careful that we don’t spread ourselves too thin. We have to choose the sectors where we have a natural advantage and back those to the hilt. Our leadership in artificial intelligence is clearly a crown jewel — funding in that sector reached an all-time quarterly high of $169 million in Q2 2018 — but we also have natural advantages in clean technologies and health care. Our sweet spot might well come from combining these strengths. We are already seeing ventures emerge that use artificial intelligence to make clean technologies smarter and more efficient.We should take pride in the fact that Toronto is a bonafide global centre of innovation. That’s why international corporations are setting up here. The arrival of big tech companies could lift all boats in our innovation ecosystem — we just have to take steps to ensure our ventures can ride the incoming tide.Yung Wu is the chief executive of the MaRS Discovery District, a Toronto innovation hub. read more

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