June 23, 2021
  • 5:29 am Rugby book Review – Once We Were Lions
  • 5:28 am Crusaders missing All Blacks trio
  • 5:27 am Rugby Rant: Abusive tweets have no place in rugby
  • 5:25 am Who should be in and out of the England squad for the Autumn Tests?
  • 7:30 am Committee reaffirms mandatory denominational health plan

first_imgBUY IT AT:  amazon.co.uk RRP:  £18.99  Published by:  Harper CollinsGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the July 2009 issue of Rugby World MagazineDo you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipc TAGS: Book Review LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. THE LATE Clem Thomas and his son Greg produced what most regard as the best Lions history yet published. But proving that you can’t have too much of a good thing, Scottish rugby writers Jeff Connor and Martin Hannan have weighed in with a book of real quality, writes Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey. Based on both the authors’ own tour experiences and fresh interviews with a host of legendary players, Once Were Lions manages to neatly sum up the Lions’ history while addressing some burning questions of modern times. If you want to know why Gerald Davies didn’t tour in 1974 or Gareth Edwards skipped 1977, the answer’s here; but Connor and Hannan have also taken the bull by the horns by examining such issues as Will Carling’s sulk in 1993, the Healey/Dawson dissent of 2001, the Kiwi violence of 1966, the drinking culture that undermined the early 1980s tours, the scathing manager reports that were covered up, and the hypocrisy of the Wilson government in trying to stop the 1974 tour while trade with South Africa increased.The stories come thick and fast and none is more startling than the day Don Hayward, who emigrated to New Zealand, received a knock on the door from a 42-year-old woman. She was a love child from a one-night stand on the 1950 tour and for the last five years of his life Hayward cherished the daughter he never knew he had.Each chapter concludes with news of what each tour’s Lions went on to do, and at times it makes painful reading. England’s John Williams, a popular 1955 tourist, developed Alzheimer’s so severely that he was detained under the Mental Health Act. The Lions Trust made a hefty donation to help pay for his care – being a Lion is to be part of a very special family.RW RATING 5/5last_img read more

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS PORT ELIZABETH, SOUTH AFRICA – AUGUST 18: Wyatt Crockett of New Zealand walks out for a New Zealand All Blacks training session at Xerox Arena on August 18, 2011 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. (Photo by Steve Haag/Gallo Images/Getty Images) Starting XV:15. Sean Maitland, 14. Adam Whitelock, 13. Robbie Fruean, 12. Ryan Crotty, 11. Zac Guildford, 10. Tom Taylor, 9. Andy Ellis, 1. Wyatt Crockett, 2. Corey Flynn, 3. Ben Franks,  4. Luke Romano, 5. Samuel Whitelock, 6. George Whitelock, 7. Matt Todd, 8. Richie McCaw (c)Replacements:16. Quentin MacDonald, 17. Owen Franks, 18. Tom Donnelly / Ross Kennedy, 19. Luke Whitelock, 20. Willi Heinz, 21. Tyler Bleyendaal, 22. Patrick Osborne Crusaders v HurricanesSaturday, 30 June 2012 at AMI Stadium, ChristchurchKick-off: 08:35 BST Clocking up the caps: Wyatt Crockett made his debut back in ’06 against the HiglandersCRUSADERS LOOSEHEAD prop Wyatt Crockett will notch up a century for the Super 15 side when he starts against the Hurricanes this Saturday in Addington.Injuries to All Black trio Dan Carter (hamstring), Israel Dagg (ankle) and Kieran Read (head) means Head Coach Todd Blackadder moves captain Richie McCaw into the number eight position usually occupied by Kieran Read, and Matt Todd will come in as flanker.Carter’s hamstring injury gives Tom Taylor the kicking duties and number ten jersey. Tyler Bleyendaal will provide cover for him from the bench.Sean Maitland comes in as fullback, and Patrick Osborne may get his first run for the Crusaders if he comes off the bench as cover for the backs.last_img read more

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first_imgIn sport mistakes will be made, games will be lost and passions will run high. But in rugby, we pride ourselves on the good grace in which we roll with the punches. Let’s keep it that way.This was published in the May 2013 edition of Rugby World. Click here to find out what’s in the current issue. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Bea Asprey“WALKING AROUND the ground with my winners’ medal is something I shall never forget. I felt like a rock star.”These are the words of Sam Warburton after Wales’ 30-3 defeat of England on the final day of the Six Nations. Humble and classy, it should be noted that Warburton may have “felt” like a rock star, but he didn’t act like one.Warburton, though, has been the victim of a worrying trend taking hold in rugby. Too often we are seeing players, coaches and officials abused. It is a cruel and ugly trait, and has no place in our sport.The growth of social media has given people more opportunity and confidence to contribute a worthless two pennies while hiding behind the safety net of anonymity. No one is immune; if you voice an opinion, you’re laying yourself open to cutting criticism and personal attack.I’m as big an advocate of Twitter as the next fan. It’s a privilege to have access to the game’s biggest stars and to witness friendly banter between both team-mates and opponents. But it’s a privilege that we will certainly lose if the harsh jibes continue, proven by the fact that Scotland back Nick De Luca, Warburton’s father, Jez, and English pundit Brian Moore have all suspended their accounts at one time or another having been subjected to unacceptable taunting.center_img On the evening of Super Saturday, the thunder rolled in and so did the jokes: “Was that a giant wheel falling off a chariot?” read one tweet.The ability to have a joke and a beer with your opponents after a match is a source of pride and what makes rugby so unique. But when the line is crossed by a minority who wish ill on individuals and their families, it threatens to spoil the face of rugby and the sport’s ethos for everyone.And it’s not limited to online abuse either. Cian Healy received a ‘violent letter’ while in camp with Ireland following his stamp on Dan Cole, while Moore was called an array of expletives in his 400-yard walk from his Cardiff hotel to the Millennium Stadium before the title decider.last_img read more

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first_imgEddie Jones will announce a 32 or 33-man strong squad for the autumn Tests in London on Wednesday, and has already given us a few clues, but who should be in and out? Got it covered: Joe Launchbury may play a big part in the Autumn SeriesBack row: Billy Vunipola, Chris Robshaw, Will Welch, Jackson Wray, Nathan Hughes, Teimana HarrisonJones has taken a real hit here with Sam Jones, James Haskell, Jack Clifford and Mike Williams all crocked hence the call for Itoje to play seven, but that has gone west with his hand injury. Luckily, Billy Vunipola is playing out of his skin and is a stone-bonking certainty to start against South Africa. The coach might want to have a look at Will Welch of Newcastle, who is regularly mentioned in dispatches by his director of rugby at the Falcons Dean Richards. Hughes, or Lawes, could do a turn at No 6 if anything befalls Robshaw but the Wasps’ man, like Ben Morgan, is miles behind Vunipola as a No 8 at the moment. Harrison, not in the EPS, may scrape into the training squad. Wray, of Saracens, could get the nod as Itoje’s replacement.Power: Nathan Hughes could form a formidable backrow with Billy Vunipola LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Back in business: Jonny May was back and scoring tries at the weekendMidfield: George Ford, Owen Farrell, Jonathan Joseph, Elliot Daly, Ben Te’oWe are going to lump the 10s, 12s and 13s together because Jones will surely stick with the Ford-Farrell axis that served England so well in Australia when he names his starting XV. Jones name-checked Ben Te’o after Worcester’s game against Gloucester and although he has been out for a couple of weeks is back in action now.  Daly has had the advantage of playing in a good Wasps team, Joseph is also back after a few weeks off but Henry Slade has not played with his usual zip and could miss out.Pace to burn: Elliot Daly is keeping Jonathan Joseph honest in midfieldScrum-halves: Danny Care, Ben Youngs, Dan RobsonBen Spencer, of Saracens, was named in the larger group but not in the training squad indicating that Robson, who shares the No.9 shirt at Wasps with Joe Simpson, has the run on him. Robson and Simpson both started three of the first six Premiership games whilst Spencer started just one of Saracens’ first half dozen. A personal view is that Richard Wigglesworth is the form scrum-half in England, and he can play more than one type of game, but his time has probably gone.In possession: Ben Youngs guided Leicester to a win over Racing 92Props: Mako Vunipola, Joe Marler, Dan Cole, Paul Hill, Kyle Sinckler, Ellis GengeMarler has his work cut out to get a starting place in front of Vunipola who is off the scale at the moment and has possession of the loose-head jersey after Marler missed the Australia trip. Cole is in a similar position to Vunipola and was praised to the high heavens by Jones after the third Test in Sydney. Hill is clearly ahead of Kieran Brookes in England terms, if not Northampton, whilst both Sinckler and Genge have got stuck in brilliantly this season and are a couple for the future.Ripping it up: Mako Vunipola is in the form of his career at SarriesHookers:  Dylan Hartley, Jamie George, Tommy TaylorIf fit, Hartley is starting and captain but it would not be a complete disaster if he does not make it and George has to take over at hooker. The Saracens’ man is no novice, he has played over 150 games for his club, and been involved in plenty of high-octane matches over the last three seasons. In Toulon last weekend he showed he can do his stuff in the loose and the tight and this observer would lose no sleep if he had to start for England after eight caps off the bench. Luke Cowan-Dickie is another casualty, he has an ankle injury, but the make-up of the Brighton squad suggests Taylor was ahead of him anyway after a string of good performances for Wasps.Talent: Jamie George provides top-quality cover for Dylan HartleyLocks: George Kruis, Joe Launchbury, Courtney Lawes, Josh BeaumontJones had  wanted to shift Maro Itoje to the back row but he is crocked and out of the reckoning – a hammer blow for England and Saracens. Beaumont has been playing No 8 for Sale this season but Jones has already said that, like his dad Bill, he is a lock, so if he is going to get picked it will be in the engine room. Kruis is an established leader, and picks himself if he is fit, he has just had minor ankle surgery, whilst you could expect in-form Launchbury to line up against the Boks. Lawes could provide some tasty cover from the bench but Beaumont should not be ignored. TAGS: Highlight England coach Eddie Jones named a 45-man Elite Player Squad on 30 September and selected 37 of them to go to a training camp in Brighton which gave you a rough idea of the pecking order in most positions. Unfortunately only 34 of the 37 returned to the clubs fit for action with Wasps’ Sam Jones, Exeter’s Jack Nowell and Bath’s Anthony Watson all getting injuries that will keep them out of the games against South Africa, Argentina, Fiji and Australia.On the plus side for the coach, Owen Farrell and Jonny May have both come back recently, although May was not invited to Brighton, and Northampton have been making positive noises about Dylan Hartley for what seems about the last month. But there are areas – such as back row and wing – where England’s strength in depth is going to be sorely tested.The boss can name players who were not in the original 45, as long as, under the agreement with Premiership Rugby, he nominates which injured ones they are replacing.So who should Jones go with amongst the players who are still standing? We have gone for a 33-man squad and scratched our heads for hours. But that is why the coaches get the big bucks and we don’t.Full-backs: Mike Brown, Alex Goode, Mike HaleyHaley is just back for Sale after a long-term shoulder injury but impressed for the Saxons in South Africa although he is clearly third on the list behind Brown and Goode who have both done well at their clubs this season. Brown brings bite, snarl and bravery whilst Goode brings bravery and a bit more footballing ability. They will both make the squad next week and it is up to Jones to take his pick after watching them in training. Brown has won 11 of his 52 caps on the wing and could be an option there if things get desperate, which they might.Fighter: Mike Brown is one of Eddie Jones’ go-to menWings: Semesa Rokoduguni, Jonny May, Marland YardeChris Ashton must be regretting his suspension as a couple of injuries, to Watson and Nowell, would have knocked him up the pecking order but Jones should get Rokoduguni in – he has been in ridiculous form – and hope that May has rediscovered his sharpness after being out since January. Yarde has been brilliant in patches this season, and awful in others, and was not even in the original EPS but he may well get another chance but it would not be sniffed at, from this point of view, if Jones wanted to see what Olly Woodburn, of Exeter, is all about. Leader: Dylan Hartley is back to lead England into battle last_img read more

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first_img July 7, 2012 at 6:54 pm I agree with Rev. Chumbley. For our 3 full time employees our premium increase will be over $21,000 for a medium sized parish in a rural community. We are trying to decide whether to cut parish programs, our extensive outreach ministries, or hurt our employees by reducing their coverage or requiring them to share costs — a net decrease in pay. There is something very wrong with a program that undercuts budgets to that extent. We have always offered very good coverage using a local agent for BCBS. It is beyond me how the BCBS option with DHP is so much higher. I think that as long as employees are adequately covered that we should be allowed to purchase our plan with the most economical option. MB Valentine says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 July 7, 2012 at 4:02 am No mention of the commonly called “Obamacare”. Does this apply? Rector Belleville, IL Jay Croft says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Amma Kim says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ General Convention, July 7, 2012 at 12:51 pm Can anyone please tell me how this will affect the “Pre-65 Retirees” of which I am one? Thanks for any info shared. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (8) Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis, Indiana] General Convention’s Committee on the Church Pension Fund voted July 6 to affirm most of the terms of the mandatory denominational health insurance plan that must be fully implemented less than six months after convention adjourns.In a new resolution, the committee stepped past a number of proposed resolutions (included in the list here) that would have changed the terms of the plan that General Convention passed via Resolution A177 at its last meeting in 2009. That resolution authorized the Church Pension Fund to implement the DHP plan by Jan. 1, 2013, with benefits to be provided through the Episcopal Church Medical Trust.The committee’s new resolution, for which a hearing still must be scheduled, commends the 94 percent of the church’s domestic dioceses (including Puerto Rico and the U.S. portion of the Diocese of the Virginia Islands) that have already joined the plan, and reaffirms the Dec. 31, 2012 enrollment deadline.The committee’s resolution extends until Dec. 31, 2015 A177’s requirement that enrolling dioceses set “minimum cost-sharing guidelines for parity between clergy and lay employees.”According to A177, those guidelines determine the minimum amount that a congregation must contribute towards the monthly premium for eligible clergy and lay employees. The dioceses that have already instituted or formulated cost-sharing policies have chosen options ranging from mandating that employers pay the full cost of a specific plan to requiring all employees to pay a percentage of any plan or of a specific plan.The new resolution also commends the Medical Trust “for progress made toward containing health-care premium costs, and urges it to continue to reduce the disparity in those costs among dioceses.” It also wants the Medical Trust to “continue to explore alternative strategies to arrive at a more equitable sharing of health-care premium costs” and to annually report to Executive Council, the House of Bishops, the medical trust board of directors and the Church Pension Fund trustees detailing progress towards that end.The committee drafted the resolution after the members spent 75 minutes earlier on July 6 discussing the testimony it heard the prior evening. During that discussion, they expressed little or no interest in ending mandatory participation in the plan.Committee members said, however, that they heard a lot of comment about the issue of what has become known as “parity.” Some committee members said people are using the term to refer both to the equal cost-sharing issue required in A177 and to mean a uniform pricing of insurance premiums across the dioceses. A subset of the latter concern, committee members said they heard, involves how the costs of insurance coverage are spread among the dioceses with some paying less and some paying more to support the entire system.It seemed doubtful that a single church-wide premium was achievable, Deputy Chair Deborah Harmon Hines said. “I think the case was made that nothing costs the same thing across the country,” she said.“But the social justice issue is more about bearing one another’s burden. And we’re all over the place on that,” she added. “We’re hearing people say they believe in that except when it comes to their own diocese.”Earlier in the discussion, the Rev. Reid Farrell, a Vermont deputy, illustrated that very point when he called it a “no brainer” that his diocese would buy health insurance outside of the Medical Trust.“I mean, it is for us, anyhow, much as we want to be part of the DHP, the parity and fairness is doing what’s best for the people in our diocese because they’re our first concern,” he said. Other committee members reacted with “Whoa.”Some committee members warned that dioceses and congregations that currently find cheaper coverage elsewhere may see their rates go up. They questioned the fairness of allowing groups to move in and out of the denominational-wide plan based on the market at any given time. In the end, the committee chose not to include concerns over that issue in its resolution.Committee members also discussed the sense they had that some clergy object to paying some portion of their insurance premiums in order to assist the congregations in their dioceses in insuring lay employees.“In order to reach parity, clergy are going to have to give a little,” Deputy Lisa Sargent of Northern California said to a round of agreement from her colleagues.“I don’t understand the resistance,” Harmon Hines agreed. “I understand that for a very long time clergy have gotten totally free health care, but that’s not the rest of the world.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 6, 2012 Committee reaffirms mandatory denominational health plan Compromise resolution sets deadline for achieving cost-sharing parity Ed Adcock says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA The. Rev. Kenneth L. Chumbley says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img July 6, 2012 at 5:39 pm The reason that in general, clergy do not pay health care premiums is simply because of the way the U.S. tax laws are presently written.The goal should be to maximize “take-home” pay for clergy and lay, at the least cost to the parish or other entity. This means, taking advantage of whatever tax breaks are available.Keep in mind also that clergy are responsible for 100% of the Social Security premium, not halfsies with the employer. Many years I have paid more in FICA tax than in net income tax.In other words, taxes for clergy and taxes for laity are apples and oranges. Susan McGarry says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 7, 2012 at 11:04 pm It was a big mistake to give the Medical Trust a monopoly on our health care in the first place. For all their posturing that it would “save money” because we would be pooling our resourses, we are seeing that this is simply not true. Monopolies are NEVER a good idea. Mark my words, the next change will be that every diocese will be required to pay the same amount as a matter of “justice.” It will force some diocese to not participate in the DHP. I know my diocese simply would not be able to afford to participate. We already have parishes who have cut hours to below the minimum and put off plans to hire lay employee because they cannot afford the expense. I’m all for requiring health care coverage for our lay employees, but we should be given plenty of time (6 to 8 years) to implement it, and we certainly should not have to buy from the Medical Trust. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 9, 2012 at 5:01 pm I agree with Jay Croft. Until clergy have parity in terms of the FICA tax, we are talking about apples and oranges. That extra 1/2 of Social Security premium would go a long way in my household to help pay a small portion of the health insurance cost. Tags General Convention 2012, Fr. D. JOE DUNLAP says: Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Polk Van Zandt says: Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC July 7, 2012 at 2:56 pm This is a well intentioned proposal that makes no sense fiscally. Has anyone calculated its cost to congregations, which are already struggling amid reduced revenues? If this proposal were mandated upon my parish, which has long provided generous health insurance to full-time lay employees, and in some instances, to their dependents, our treasurer estimates our health insurance costs would increase by some $100,000. If this expansive, expensive mandate passes, I hope the increased costs for it can and will be offset by equal reductions in congregational payments to dioceses, with corresponding reductions in diocesan payments to the national church. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Health & Healthcare July 7, 2012 at 1:47 am I think the Committee should know how difficult many of my colleagues have found it to use the mental health portion of the National Insurance Plan. It is restrictive and offers few choices for “in network” providers. Also, speaking of justice, this plan, because it eliminates the options many dioceses now provide that often make it possible to cover employees in a variety (and often cost saving ways), becomes another way that small congregations subsidize larger ones. I imagine a high percentage of small congregations don’t have any lay employees that qualify at all for the insurance. In the name of justice for lay employees in larger congregations, these congregations must bear the increased cost of this prohibitive one choice national plan. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

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first_imgRapidísimas Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL El presidente de la Cámara de Representantes, John Boehner, prometió el jueves pasado que pedirá al bloque republicano que apruebe una extensión a corto plazo de la capacidad de endeudamiento para que el gobierno de Estados Unidos pueda pagar sus cuentas, de acuerdo con CNN.La reconciliación de los cubanos de la isla y la diáspora está siendo estudiada siguiendo el ejemplo alemán después de la caída del muro de Berlín en 1989 entre la Alemania Occidental y la Alemania Oriental (comunista). En una reunión en la Universidad de Georgetown en Virginia hubo representantes del exilio cubano y opositores que viven en Cuba. Un experto alemán dijo que las iglesias tienen el deber de brindar “un techo” y agregó que en la Alemania Oriental los pastores luteranos ofrecieron espacios donde grupos no gubernamentales pudieron reunirse sin molestias. Dagoberto Valdés, activista laico católico residente de Pinar del Río en Cuba, dijo que la reunificación de los cubanos necesitará “verdad, justicia, perdón, inclusión y una ética civil” entre otras condiciones. Añadió que “Sin perdón, el comunismo gana”. Hans Küng, prominente escritor y teólogo suizo, nacido en 1928,  sufre la enfermedad de Parkinson cerca de su fase terminal. En 1971 el papa Juan Pablo II lo inhabilitó por sus severas críticas a la iglesia y le prohibió enseñar teología católica. Küng ha sorprendido al mundo cristiano por su deseo de que se le practique “el suicidio asistido” diciendo que “no quiero seguir viviendo como una sombra de mí mismo”. Teresa MacBain, pastora metodista norteamericana, hija de pastor y profesora de seminario pasó por una crisis de fe y dijo que se sentía mejor siendo atea. La Universidad de Harvard la contrató para ser directora del Proyecto de la Comunidad Humanista de la universidad principalmente visitando grupos ateos en diferentes partes del país. Pero las cosas no ocurrieron como ella pensaba: la Universidad de Duke descubrió que ella no se había graduado de esa universidad aunque había puesto esa información en sus documentos académicos. Resultado que la joven profesora se ha quedado “en la calle y sin llavín”. Boz Tchividjian, profesor de leyes en la Liberty University de Virginia y nieto del evangelista Billy Graham, se especializa en investigar casos de abuso sexual. Recientemente dijo ante la Asociación de Escritores de Noticias Religiosas que organizaciones misioneras (evangélicas) no reportan los casos de abuso porque las iglesias que los reciben en el extranjero devolverían los misioneros al instante.  “Quizás nosotros tenemos más casos que los mismos católicos pero no lo admitimos”, dijo Tchividjian. El papa Francisco criticó el establecimiento de hoteles de lujo en Europa y América Latina de lo que un día fueron conventos, seminarios y centros misioneros siglos atrás. Esos lugares debían dedicarse a albergar a refugiados y a personas sin hogar, dijo Francisco según un documental de la BBC de Londres. Citó el caso del Hotel Monasterio en el Cusco, Perú, que albergara en 1598 el Seminario San Antonio Abad. El duque y la duquesa de Cambridge han invitado al arzobispo de Cantórbery, Justin Welby para que oficie la ceremonia del bautizo de su hijo Jorge Alejandro Luis el día 23 de octubre en la Capilla Real del Palacio de St. James en Londres. La capilla es bien reducida en tamaño y por eso sólo la familia íntima y algunos más serán invitados. El arzobispo ha expresado su complacencia por la invitación. El niño nacido el 22 de julio está en tercer lugar en la sucesión al trono británico.El presidente de Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro, dijo la semana pasada en un discurso televisado lo que sus opositores sabían, pero querían oírlo de su boca. “Yo no soy presidente por la mayoría de votos, ni por mis ideas, ni por mi carácter…. Yo estoy aquí porque ese fue el deseo expreso de nuestro comandante Hugo Chávez antes de morir”, observadores políticos piensan que Maduro no estará mucho tiempo en el poder debido a las luchas internas y su poca popularidad en el pueblo.Martiniano García, obispo episcopal de Cuernavaca, México,  ha fallecido a los 80 años de edad el 4 de octubre de complicaciones cardíacas. Hizo sus estudios teológicos en el Seminario de San Andrés y además se graduó de contador de la Universidad Autónoma de México.  En sus últimos años sirvió como obispo interino de la Diócesis del Litoral de Ecuador. Le sobreviven su esposa Rebeca, cinco hijos y varios nietos. Que descanse en la paz del Señor nuestro estimado hermano.  VERDAD. Todos somos muy ignorantes. Lo que ocurre es que no todos ignoramos las mismas cosas. Albert Einstein Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Por Onell A. SotoPosted Oct 11, 2013 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET World Refugee Day AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Video: Presiding Bishop Curry on World Refugee Day ‘We must find a way to end the suffering of human beings’ Featured Jobs & Calls Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Eventscenter_img Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Posted Jun 16, 2016 Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group 2:12In 2000, the United Nations named June 20 as World Refugee Day, deeming it an annual opportunity to celebrate the resilience and success of the former refugees who bless our communities with their wisdom and irrepressible spirit and to examine the root causes of violence and persecution that force people to flee at an alarming rate.The Presiding Bishop’s message is here. Closed captioned video available here.The following is the text of Presiding Bishop Curry’s 2016 World Refugee Day message:World Refugee DayIn the late 1930s the world found itself on the verge of what became a terrible war.  The Second World War.  Millions of refugees were fleeing from Europe and fleeing around the world seeking asylum and safe haven.In 1938 The Episcopal Church published this poster with the depiction of Mary, Joseph, and the infant Jesus, and it read, “In the name of these refugees,” referring to Mary, Joseph and Jesus, “Aid all refugees.”The United Nations is now asking the peoples of the Earth, of all religious stripes and types, to once again come to the aid of those who are refugees.I’m standing in front of the Isaiah Wall, based on the prophecy of the words of Isaiah, in the Second Chapter of his book, where the word says that one day, people will come to Mount Zion from all over the Earth, and they will hear God’s law, God’s way, and when people hear God’s way for life,It is then that they will beat their swords into plowshares.Their spears into pruning hooks.It is then that the nations of the Earth will learn war no more.Indeed, we must find a way to end war, but we must find a way to end the suffering of human beings who are forced from their homes.  So I encourage you to support United Nations World Refugee Day.  And do anything that you can do to bring an end to the unhappy lot for many so that they may find life as Jesus said, and have it more abundantly.God bless you, God keep you, and you keep the faith.The Most Rev. Michael B. CurryPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchAdditional information• Prayer for World Refugee DayWritten by #ShareTheJourney pilgrim Alyssa Stebbing, Outreach Ministry Director and Contemporary Music Director at Trinity Episcopal Church, The Woodlands, Texas:Gracious God, we pray for our newest neighbors, that those families who have sought refuge from the ravages of war and violence may find not only shelter and sustenance, but also a loving and supportive community in which to create a new beginning with dignity. Amen.• Ways and resources to observe World Refugee Day on June 20 here.  Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL January 21, 2017 at 12:00 pm I hope not. Abortion is murder and any support of a platform that supports murder is incompatible with Christian teaching. Faith & Politics Rector Washington, DC January 19, 2017 at 8:14 pm I don’t remember such a wonderful series o prayer events for President Obama or Bush or Clinton . Maybe Trump will really suceed. I give thanks for Tomorrow. Rector Bath, NC Doug Desper says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Rector Albany, NY Episcopalians approach Donald Trump’s inauguration with prayer Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 20, 2017 at 4:25 pm The church leaders are lemmings as they attempt through deceit to re-interpret the Bible to suit their own agendas; not God’s. They despise Trump. The lay folk who understand and do not try to re-interpret God’s word see the wisdom and leadership of Trump. The lay folk’s eyes are not blinded by the teachings of the church leaders. Ronald Davin says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Margaret Smist says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 20, 2017 at 8:43 am The Washington Post and New York Times reported that the New Wave Feminists were made to withdraw as a March sponsor because they are prolife and the other women’s groups didn’t want them. That shows the real purpose of the March. Seems that some women are more equal than others. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 January 19, 2017 at 4:31 pm is the Episcopal Church USA participating in the Women’s March on Washington this coming Saturday? Will anyone from the Episcopal Church be speaking or on the platform? How is our church supporting this event? Rector Knoxville, TN January 20, 2017 at 4:18 pm Good to see the Church is supporting such a great man. Through the Episcopalian Church, we thank God that Don John Trump is our 45th President. We as a country have truly been blessed by his election. Let’s make America Great Again! Yours in Christ, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest January 20, 2017 at 10:05 pm As an Episcopalian Christian, I will pray for the new President. But I do not believe we can separate Donald Trump and his administration from his message. If there is going to be such notable Episcopalian involvement as he assumes power, then I must work all the harder to speak out against the things he says and does.https://aileenssite.wordpress.com/2017/01/20/prayers-yes-but-those-are-not-my-values/ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Donald Trump, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 stephen sim says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZcenter_img Tags Aileen Chang-Matus says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA January 20, 2017 at 7:44 pm The Lord has delivered us ! Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS January 20, 2017 at 10:16 am I agree that the pro-life group should have been allowed to sponsor and walk — and I say that as a Pro-Choice woman. I know many of my own relatives who are Pro-Life, and although they would not see themselves as feminists (since they see it as a liberal label) I see them as feminists – strong women fighting for themselves and their rights. I offer up prayers today since I have real concerns for the next administration. I am hoping and praying all these prayers for God’s love, kindness, respect, dignity for all and compassion make their way into the hearts of Donald Trump and the future administration. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Donald Heacock says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska The sign outside Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Hilltown, Pennsylvania, invites people to stop in for prayer on Inauguration Day. Photo: Good Shepherd Episcopal Church via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] Episcopal congregations are planning to mark with prayer the events surrounding Donald Trump’s Jan. 20 inauguration as the 45th president of the United States.Many congregations have announced that they will be open for prayer during the inauguration events. Some will also offer special services that day. Among the many are St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Kansas City, Missouri; Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Hilltown, Pennsylvania; St. John’s Episcopal Church in Huntington, West Virginia and Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, Missouri.“We welcome parishioners and community residents to drop in for any part of that time. There will be no service, just the opportunity to join with others to pray in the silence of God’s presence,” Good Shepherd said on its Facebook page. “We Episcopalians call ourselves people of common prayer, and that usually means worshiping together using the words of the Book of Common Prayer. But, shared silence can also be a form of common prayer, too. Please join us in lifting our hopes and fears to God in prayer, whether or not you can be with us at church.”Among other events around the Episcopal Church are these:Diocese of New Jersey plans weekend of prayer“With the beginning of a new Congress and the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump, our nation enters a new chapter in its history,” New Jersey Bishop Williams “Chip” Stokes wrote to the diocese, calling for a weekend of prayer to begin at noon on Jan. 21.“Praying together, though in different locations, joins us as a diocese with the Episcopal Church and the wider community of faith as the 58th Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service at the National Cathedral finishes,” Stokes wrote. “Collectively we remind ourselves that God is ultimately in charge and we appeal to him for the best for our nation.”A special Office of Noonday Prayer at Trinity Cathedral in Trenton is the formal start to the New Jersey effort. Stokes asked congregations to host similar services, and those unable to attend, he said, ought to pause at noon that day for a period of personal prayer. The bishop also urged congregations to “incorporate prayers for our nation in each of their liturgies during the weekend.”The diocese has posted a toolkit for those prayers and liturgies here.‘A Weekend of Prayer and Resistance’All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California, plans to spend Jan. 20-22 working “with our interfaith allies and community partners to continue to be the change we want to see in our nation and our world,” according to an announcement on its website. Events include an “interfaith inauguration viewing” party Jan. 20, healing prayer all that day and a noon Eucharist (to be livestreamed here), and participation in the Jan. 21 Los Angeles Women’s March (one of many satellite marches planned around the country in conjunction with the main march in Washington, D.C.). The parish plans a forum on Jan. 22 titled “Intersectional Resistance: Part 1 – Reproductive Justice & LGBTQ Equality,” described as “a conversation focused on organizing to protect our rights, our safety, our health, and our families.” There will be additional liturgies at All Saints and participation in a Muslim prayer service and Shabbat services elsewhere.Open for prayerThe Cathedral of the Incarnation in Garden City, New York, on Long Island will be open for prayer from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Inauguration Day. It will also offer its normal weekday Morning Prayer service at 8:45 a.m. and Eucharist at 12:15 p.m. The Very Rev. Michael Sniffen, cathedral dean, and the Rev. Michael F. Delany, canon pastor, plan to attend Ghostlight at Adelphi University in Garden City Jan. 19. Ghostlight is an inauguration eve vigil being held by the theater community at 728 theaters across the country. Sniffen and several parishioners are traveling with Trinity Wall Street to Washington, D.C., for the Women’s March.Pray in place prayer vigilWashington National Cathedral’s Center for Prayer and Pilgrimage is coordinating a Pray in Place Prayer Vigil from 6 a.m. Jan. 20 through midnight on Jan. 21.“No matter where you are or what you are doing, take time to add your voice to the voice of others as we pray throughout the days surrounding the inauguration,” the announcement said.  The center will offer prayers for “wisdom for our leaders, justice for our communities and peace for our world” at the top of every hour via the center’s Facebook page. Those prayers will also be available to those who follow the center on Twitter here.All faiths inauguration vigilTrinity Episcopal Cathedral in Omaha, Nebraska, plans a morning vigil to coincide with the inauguration. Open to all faiths, the time will open with Morning Prayer and end with Eucharist at noon.“This is an opportunity to quiet ourselves and to offer our hearts and minds a chance to rest from the tension and noise of this uniquely difficult time in our nation’s history,” the Very Rev. Craig Loya, dean of the cathedral, told the Omaha World-Herald.‘The Inauguration of Hope’Actor, writer and director Ethan Hawke; actress and singer Karen Akers; musician Paul Winter; Cathedral of St. John the Divine poet-in-residence Marilyn Nelson and many other noteworthy musicians, performers, and poets will stage a gathering Jan. 23 at the cathedral in Manhattan to reaffirm “what we’re for, not what we’re against” and to “recommit to the values we hold in common.”  Cathedral friend and Episcopalian actor Anthony Newfield will be the master of ceremonies. More information is available here.Editor’s note: A previous version of this story included information about a peaceful prayer vigil planned for Jan. 21 outside Washington National Cathedral during the National Prayer Service. That service has been canceled due to Secret Service security restrictions around the building that day. Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ernie Hammel says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Joseph Simpkins-Arganbright says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ January 21, 2017 at 12:14 pm The National Cathedral is not an abortion clinic, it is a House of Prayer. Remember, Jesus ran the money-changers out of the Temple. Beware, my friend. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Pam Hinojosa says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 lauren anderson says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET January 21, 2017 at 12:09 pm I think more old school Episcopalians are celebrating with joy that President Trump is now the leader of the free world. He is a sincere and faithful servant of the people of our country. I believe he will tell the truth and in that truth, we have the promise of Jesus that we will be set free. However, many parishes (including the one I attend) are split over this election. However, the good news is that these same parishes never really were all that united. The progressives in the church have taken us down a slippy road and only God knows the final chapter of that story. While our numbers dwindle, the church in other avenues is growing. Thanks be to God, the Gospel is still being preached and Jesus is still being lifted up. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (14) By ENS staffPosted Jan 19, 2017 Ernie Hammel says: January 19, 2017 at 11:24 pm What is so awesome is so many people including Muslims are coming to Christ through this whole election. Maybe we really will have peace on earth .. January 20, 2017 at 8:20 am I am deeply saddened that the National Cathedral is participating in the inauguration of such a man as is coming to the office. To send children to sing will be interpreted by him as if the choir sings for him and all of his followers are already locally gloating that liberals are in support of Trump. Mor greatly saddened that the Cathedral has not announced prayers of protection and peace for the Women’s Marches all across our land. Many regional Episcopal churches are holding prayers for everyone involved. Regardless of what the Dean has said about the Cathedral’s participation; he forgets that those who support Trump are not readers but rely on news through hysteria filled antics of tv news. Certain of those will have a field day with what happens today regarding the Episcopal Church. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA January 20, 2017 at 2:53 am What does the Episcopal church think about Donald Trump being inaugurated for president? I am a life long Episcopalian and would like to know! ! My church in Lincoln, Nebraska, seems to be split! Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

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first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By David PaulsenPosted Sep 14, 2017 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Comments (1) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bert Ehrhardt says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN July 28, 2017 at 4:31 pm Absolutely beautiful with obvious contemplative possibilities. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal racial reconciliation event draws large crowd in Lexington, Virginia Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Racial Justice & Reconciliation Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Wornie Reed, director of the Race and Social Policy Research Center and a professor of sociology and Africana studies at Virginia Tech, speaks Sept. 13 about race and civil discourse to community members in Lexington, Virginia. Southwestern Virginia Bishop Mark Bourlakas, whose diocese coordinated the event, can be seen standing at the back of the audience. Photo: Connor B. Gwin[Diocese of Southwestern Virginia — Lexington, Virginia] More than 150 community members crowded a middle school cafeteria in Lexington, Virginia, Sept. 13 to hear a lecture on race and civil discourse presented by Wornie Reed, director of the Race and Social Policy Research Center at Virginia Tech and professor of sociology and Africana studies there.The event was coordinated by the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia and co-sponsored by 10 community groups and ecumenical faith partners.Reed’s lecture covered his work studying racial bias by police in Montgomery County, Virginia, as well as his proposed framework for discussing race.“There is a great need to have productive conversations about race and … quite often these dialogues are uncomfortable,” Reed said. In fact, he argued, merely talking about racism is “supremely unproductive.”Instead, Reed called for a focus on the institutionalized practice of racism. Using such an approach means “we can discuss these issues quite freely and across racial lines,” he said.The talk was the first of a three-part series hosted by the diocese entitled “Pursuing the Beloved Community: A Continuing Conversation on Race.”Plans to facilitate a conversation on racial division in southwest Virginia began after the last General Convention when then newly elected Presiding Bishop Michael Curry announced he would make racial reconciliation a focus of his term. The release in May of this year of the church’s “Becoming Beloved Community” resources, as well as the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, reinforced the importance of these events.Southwestern Virginia Bishop Mark Bourlakas recently told the diocese that diocesan staff had planned a series of events across the diocese on the topic of racial reconciliation. “The tragic events in Charlottesville have strengthened our resolve to be the hands and feet of Christ in our communities, urging one another onward in the mission of God,” he wrote. “The work of reconciliation is very hard, very necessary, and our duty as followers of Jesus Christ.”The white supremacist rally and violence in Charlottesville Aug. 12 brought more attention to the issue of racial reconciliation and the rise in racist rhetoric in the past several years. The debate is not only about city parks and statues, but also the sanctuaries of churches across the United States.One such church is R.E. Lee Memorial Episcopal Church in Lexington, which has been in a heated debate for two years over the future of the parish’s name.Curry highlighted the new urgency that has emerged following the events in Charlottesville in a meeting with Episcopalians in that city last week. “The bitter, painful reality of what we have called and known to be racism, which never went away, was like a scab was ripped off Aug. 12, and the whole country saw it,” he said during his visit.This harsh reality was the focus of Reed’s lecture as he appealed to the facts of institutionalized racism over a conversation about individual actions.“There is a widely held assumption that individual prejudice leads to racism. … But where does prejudice come from? No one is born prejudiced,” Reed said. “I would argue that we have racist orientations, activities and policies [in this country] that lead people to think a certain way.”The next lecture, which will focus on racial profiling and police use of force, is scheduled for Oct. 25 at the Northwest Community Center in Roanoke, Virginia. More information will be posted here.The unedited recording of Reed’s lecture is here. All the events will be edited into smaller portions for use in parish formation classes.— The Rev. Canon Connor B. Gwin is the canon for social engagement and Christian formation in the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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first_imgWelby reiterates dilemma he says he faced over inviting same-sex spouses to Lambeth In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Anglican Consultative Council, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion, Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby spent about 70 minutes the evening of May 1, the fourth day of the Anglican Consultative Council meeting in Hong Kong, answering questions from ACC members and staff. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Hong Kong] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby continues to be asked about his decision to exclude the same-sex spouses of bishops invited to the 2020 Lambeth Conference.“For some reason, I thought that question might come up,” Welby replied when Oklahoma Bishop Edward J. Konieczny asked him during an evening question-and-answer session here May 1 to elaborate on his decision and his thoughts about how to work through the disagreements in the communion over human sexuality.This is the second time Welby has addressed the issue here. The day before the Anglican Consultative Council, or ACC, began its 17th meeting, Welby said during an April 27 news conference that the council cannot discuss his decision because the ACC constitution precludes the group from dealing with doctrinal matters.“I think I would put it very simply,” Welby replied to Konieczny. “We are deeply, profoundly divided over the question of human sexuality.“I find myself deeply torn,” he said, adding that he has publicly said numerous times that he is “personally conservative” on the issue of marriage equality.“But I am equally convinced that it may be that I am wrong. I think that part of Anglican theology is always an assumption that we need to go on listening. Anglican theological method never closed things down finally apart from those things that are in the creeds,” Welby said. “Secondly, I do not believe this is a church-splitting issue.”The archbishop said he is often accused of “preferring unity over truth,” an accusation he called nonsense because one cannot have “truthless unity” or “divided truth” in the church.Welby said he believes that “the Bible, properly interpreted, is the final source for matters of faith and practice.” Nowhere in Paul’s two letters to what Welby called a divided and dysfunctional church in Corinth does Paul tell them he is going to abandon them and start over someplace else, Welby said.Human sexuality is “an incredibly important issue,” Welby said, adding that he tries to remember this is about people. “They’re not a problem or an issue; they’re people, they’re human beings with deep profound feelings, with a desire, as every human being has, for affection, intimacy and love,” he said.The job of the archbishop of Canterbury, and of every bishop, is to be a “focus of unity,” Welby said. “Therefore, I find myself caught in a really difficult position where we seek to bring everyone together, to look at these questions together, to see if we can learn to do so lovingly, to disagree well, to learn to love one another profoundly and deeply, and to respect each other’s human dignity. And there’s a lot of way to go on that.”Speaking specifically about the 2020 Lambeth Conference, Welby said he was faced “with a really difficult decision, because an awful lot of people would be excluded by the inclusion of other people, and they’re people in really bad places. I love them and I love the people who I’ve not felt able to invite. I’ve got no better answer than that.”The archbishop said he hopes “we can get to the point that, God willing, we can love one another deeply” but “we’re a long way from that.”“We can only do it if we decide together to do it. We can’t do it if any individual part of the church says, ‘I’ve got to win and everyone else has got to lose.’ It doesn’t work that way.”Read more about itACC background is here.Ongoing ENS coverage of the ACC is here.The Anglican Communion News Service is also covering the meeting here.Tweeting is happening with #ACC17HK.The bulk of the meeting is taking place at the Gold Coast Hotel, about 45 minutes from central Hong Kong.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. 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